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Docewwrrs ofFiafcLS 

OOVERWMENT PUBLICATIONS 
University of Ottawa 

BIBLIOTHeOUE DE DROIT 

U.d'O. 

O.U. 

LAW LIBRARY 



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SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



V L U M E 7. Universe dT*awa 

UOCSMBTfTS OFFICIALS 

GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS 

University of Ottawa 



FIRST SESSION of the FIFTH PARLIAMENT 



BIBLIOTHECA 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SESSION 1883. 



VOL. XVI. 



."V ... 



Printed by MacLean, Roger & Co., Wellington, Street, Ottawa. 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS, 



VOL. XVI,— SESSION 1883. 



AKKANGED ALPHA BE TICALLY 



A No. 

Accidental and Life Insurance, abstract for 

1882 126 

Accidents on G.T. R 76a 

Accidents on I.C.R 40i 

Administration of Justice, claims of the Pro- 
vinces... .i 119 

Adulteration of Food 4 

Agents, duty on, by Registrar of Supreme 

Court 63 

Agricultural Implements, &c, imported into 

Manitoba and N.W.T ....... 103 to 1036 

Agriculture, Annual Report 14 

Albert County Court... 67a 

Albert (Port) Harbor 46c 

Allan Line and I.C.R. Freight Tariff for 

season 1882-83 39 & 39a 

Appropriation Accounts 6 

Appointments, Civil Service 13a, 21 

Auditor-General's Report 6 

Award, Ontario Boundary 95 

B 

Baie de3 Chaleurs Railway Co., subsidy to.. 121 

Bailiffs, Dominion, appointment of 62 & 62a 

Baker, David, appointment of. 110 

Banks, shareholders of 19 

Banque de St. Jean 34 

Baptisms, Marriages and Burials 44 

Batteries, "A" and a B," No, instructed, &c 31c 

Batteries " A " and " B," officers staff. 56a 

Bayfield Harbor 46/ 

Belgium, commercial arrangements with. ... 89 

Bernatchez, N., tobacco seizure 35a 

Berthier, camp at, in 1882 31/ 

Blackeby's Report , 16 

Blankets for Militia 316 

Bonds and Securities 25 

Boundary Award, Ontario ,... 95 

Bounty, claims for fishing 37,37c 

/Bounty to fishermen 37c 

Brae, Prince Co., P.E.I 52c 

Brandy Pots and River du Loup Semaphores 74 

Brazil, trade between Canada and 98 

Breakwaters 52 to 52c 

BreakwRi-rs, New Harbor, N.S.... 52a 

do Port Lome, N.S 52 

Bridge at St. John, railway 47 & 47a 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co .. 73 
British Columbia Coa3t, H.M. Ships of war on 106 

British Columbia,Constitution, &c 70 

British Columbia, immigration into 93,93a 

British Columbia Penitentiary 29a 

British [Columbia, Pilots and Pilotage .^.. 111 

Buoys and Beacons, Lake Huron 87 

Burials, Baptisms and Marriages 44 

3 



€ No. 

Cadets, Royal Military College 56 

Callander and Gravenhurst, railway be- 

tweer^ sv.hsidy to 121 

Campbellton, steamer connecting with I.C.R 40& 
Canada Central R'y acquisition byC.P.R.... 27n 
Canada Central Railway, Pembroke bonus. 69 

Canada, ordnance for ... 116 

Canada, railway map of 8a 

Canada trade with West Indies and Brazil. . 98 

Canadian Extradition Act 32 

Canadian Pacific Land Bonds 27c, 27/ 

Canadian Paciiic Railway 27 to 27r, 69 

Canadian Pacific Railway Commission 27^ 

do do map of, &c 27o 

Canadian Statutes ■ 17 to 176,28 

do Tobacco 35 & 33a 

Canadian Vessels in the Great Lakes, dis- 
asters, &c f-8 

Canal Statistics - 4 

Canals 4, 81, 83, 105 to l(5c,109 

Canals and Railways, Annual Report 8 

Canals, Public Debt incurred for 109 

Cape Breton Constitution, &c 70 

Caraquet Railway Co., N.B., subsidy to ..... 121 

Carillon and Grenville Canal 105 to 1056 

Cartridge Factory, Quebec , 99 

Census and Statistics , 24 

Charybdis,HM.S 120 

Chinese Immigration into British Columbia. 93a 
Civil Service, appointments and promotions 13a 

do Examiners' Report 13 

do Montreal 136 

Claims against Intercolonial Railway 406 

do for Fishing Bounty 37 

Coal Lands, North-We3t, sale and lease of. 366 

do Lands, regulations for 36a 

do quantity exported 36c 

do do from N.S 36 

Cockburn, James, Q.C., commission to ....17 to 176 

Collisions on I.C.R 40i 

Colonization Grants 117 

Colonization, land for. . 84 

Commercial arrangements France,Spain, &c. 89 

Commissioner of Fisheries, Report of. 7 

Commissioner to France 60 

Commission, Intercolonial Railway 406 

Commission to James Cockburn, Q.C 17 to 176 

do revise. Canadian Statutes..l7tol76 

Consolidated Fund, expenditure and receipt 

charged to 30 

Constitutions, &c, of C.B., N.S., P.E.I., 

N.B., B.C. and Vancouver Island 70 

Constriction, C.P.R., progress of 27c? 

Contracts A. and B., C.P.R., change of con- 
struction u.... — .-.. 27p 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



C No- 

Contracts, C.P.R .. 27* 

County Court Judge?, increase of aatlary .... 676 

County Court, N"ew Brunswick 67 

County Courts 67 to 676 

County Courts, Kings and Albert 67a 

Court, Maritime -. 68 & 63a 

Credit Valley Railway, C.P.R. interest in... 27» 

Credit Valley Slock 27a 

Criminal Statistics for 1881 14 

Customs Department., Montreal 136, 49 

Customs Duties paid by C.P.R 27m 

do refunded at Toronto 91 



Dauphenee, Jas., claim of. 115 

De la Chevrotiere, Mr. 0. C - 51 

Digby, N.S., whar&gesat 79 

JDionne, — , factor's bill for attending- ..... 40c 
Disasters to Canadian Vessels in the Great 

Lakes 53 

Distilled and FVrmented Liquors imported 

and manufactured 59 

Distribution. Canadian Statutes 28 

Dominion Bailiffs, appointment of 62 & 62a 

Dominion Police, expenditure of 18 

Dominion Statutes .,....,.17 to 176, 28 

Drawbacks, manufactured goods exported... 45a 

do do iron do ... 45a 

Drawbacks, shipbuilding materials 45 

Drill Shed, Iona 50 

Drugs, analysis of.... 4a 

Duties on Salt 65 

Duties paid by C.P.R. on imports 27m 

E 

Eastern Extension Railway, N.S 40; 

Ecuador, commercial arrangements with.... 89 

Egypt, do do .... 89 

Election, General, 1882-83 77 & 77a 

Estimates, 1883-84 ... 1 

Estimates, Supplementary, 1882-83 1 

Estimates, Supplementary, 1883-8i 1 

Estimates, Further Supplementary, 1883-84, 1 

Examination of Mates ~ 7 

Excise, Montreal. 136 

Expenditure, British Columbia Penitentiary 29a 

Expenditure, Dominion Police 18 

do an d receipt t charged to Consoli- 
dated Fund -... 30 

Expenses and Revenue, I. C.R 40a 

Expenses, unforeseen 22,42 

Exports and Imports last half 1882 92 

Extradition Act, Canadian 32 



Fabre, Hon. Hector, Commission to France. 

Factory Labor 16 

Fermented and Distilled Liquors, imported 

and manufactured 

Fermented and Distilled Liquors, materials 

used in 

Field Battery, Richmond. 

Fiffti General Election 77 

Fines and Seizures — 

Fines exacted and how disposed of. 

Fire Insurance, 1880 to Id32 inclusive, in 

Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, Hamilton, 

Ottawa, Halifax, St. John, N.B 

Fire and Marine Insurance, abstract for 1882 

Fisheries 37 

Fisheries and Marine, Annual Report 

Fisheries, Commissioner's Report 

Fishermen, bounty to 



& 16a 

59 

59 
31c 

&77a 
38 
38 



12c 

12a 

to 37c 

7 

7 

37c 



' ■< • • i 

F No. 

Fishery Inspectors, instruct! ens as to salmon 376 

do seizures made by 376 

Fishing Bounty Claims 37,37c 

Fishing Leases or Licenses in N.B..... 37a 

Fishing, Lob3ter, close season 37c 

Fog-Whistles, Shelburne Harbor 66 

Food, Adulteration of 4 & 4a 

France, commercial arrangements with 89 

do Commissioner in 60 

Freight Sheds and Warehouse at St, John, 

N.B., I C.R 4G# 

Freight Tariff between I.C.R. and Allan 

Line for Season 1832-83* 39 & 39a 

Freight Tariff, Western Division, C.P.R 27j 

Frontenac Terrace, Quebec . ... 113 

e 

Gaspe, Petition of the Fish Merchants of.... 98 

Gaspe, steamer connecting with I.C.R 40A; 

Gatineau Valley Railway Co., subsidy to.... 121 

General Election, 1882 77 & 77a 

General Election, 1882, list of Returning 

Officers 33 

Genii, request of the Master of, to release 

sailors 72 

Germany, commercial arrangements with... 89 
Germany, steamship communication with... 71 

Gkndon, steamer to replace the ... 97 

Goodwin, Jas., amount paid. 105 

Government Lien on G.T.R .7o'>, 76c 

Government Survey, Lot No. 133, Manitoba 107 

Governor General's Warrants 26, 43 

Grain and Products of Grain 100 

Grand Trunk Railway 76 to 76c 

Gravenhurstto Callander, railway between, 

subsidy to * 121 

Great American and European Short Line 

Railway Co', subsidy to 12JL 

Greece's Point, Grenville Canal i05a, 1056 

Grenville and Carillon Canal. •. 10 j to 1056 



Halifax and Cape Breton R'y and Coal Co... AOj 

Halifax, Fire Insurance in, from IScO to 1882 12c 

Halifax, troops in, 88 

Hamilton, Fire Insurance in, from :c80 to 

1882 12c 

Hamilton & North-Western Railway, pur- 
chase of shares by G.T.R. 76 

Havelock and Petitcodiac, N.B., railway be- 
tween, subsidy to 121 

Hebert, H., fraudulent practices 7* 

Heney, Stewart & Co., Contractors 105a&105Z 

H.M. Ships of War British Columbia Coast.. 10d 

Hudson Bay 104 

Huron Lake, buoys and beacons 8'| 

Hydrographical Survey 6< 



Immigration .. 93 to 93< 

Immigration into British Columbia 93, 93. 

Implements, agricultural, imported into 

Manitoba and N.W.T 103 to 103 

Imports and Exports, last half 1882 a 

Indian Affairs, Annual Report. 

Indiau Agency, Manitoba , > 1 

Inland Revenue, Annual Report ~ 

Inland Revenue, Montreal 13,1 

Instruction Staff, Royal Military College.... 

Insurauce „ , ,..,.12 toll 

Insurance, Report of Superintendent 

Intercolonial Railway . . ....... .40 to 40Z, 1 

do Commission 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



I No. 

Intercolonial Railway subsidy to 121 

Interior, Department of, Annual Report 23 

International R'y Co., subsidy to .. 121 

Intoxicating Liquors.... 59 to 596 

Iona Drill Shed 50 

Iron manufactured, drawback on if exported 45a 



Jamaica, commercial arrangements with. ... 89 

Jewish Refugees from Russia 93c 

Judgas, County Court increase of salary.... 676 
Justice, administration of, claims of the 

Provinces 119 



Kaministiquia River, C.P.R. terminus 27*r 

Ketchum, H. G C, claim on I.C. R. 402 

Kings County Court 67a 



Labor in Factories 16 & 16a 

Lake Huron, buoys and beacons 87 

Lake of the Woods, steamers for 114 

do St. John Railway. 90 

Land Bonds, C P.R 27c, 27/ 

84 

20 

40£ 

21k 



do for colonization 

Land Improvement Fund 

Land taken in St. John for I.C.R 

Lands', C.P.R 

Lands given to Canada by Imperial Govern- 

ment 113 

Lands, Ordnance 82 & 82a 

Lebel, Dr., account of 40e 

Legislation in P.Q., proposed, affecting 

Liquors . 59a 

Library of Parliament, Annual Report 15 

Life and Accidental Insurance, abstract for 

1882 126 

Life-Saving Stations 112 

Lighthouse at Quaco 57 

Liquors, distilled and fermented. 59 

do sale of 59a & 596, 61 

Liverpool Bay, breakwater at 526 

Loan and Investment Co., British Canadian 73 

Lobster Fishing, close season 37c 

Location Eastern Section, C.P.R 27./ 

Luke's Report 16a 

Lyon, Mr. J. A 122 

SI 

Mail Service, between Canada and G.B....39 & 39a 
Manitoba, agricultural implements imported 

into -.103 to 1036 

Manitoba Indian Agency 123 

Manitoba, subsidies for 108 

Manufactured Goods exported, drawback on 45a 

Marine and Fire Insurance, abstract for 1882 12a 

Marine and Fisheries, Annual Report 7 

Maritime Court, Ontario, rules of, &c 68a 

do proceedings of 68 

Atarriages, Baptisms and Burials 44 

-Measures and Weights 4 

Meridian, prime or standard 48 

Militia 31 to 31/ 

Jklilitia, Annual Report y 

Militiamen, 1812 31 & 31a 

Miller, J. A., Judge 53 

Mineral Lands, regulations for the disposal 

of 102 

Mining Licenses in disputed territory (On- 
tario) 118 

Mining regulations for disposal of other than 

coal lands 102 

Jliramichi Valley Railway Co., subsidy to... 121 



M No. 

Molasses imported by vessels 586 

Montenegro, commercial arrangements with 89 

Montreal and Western R'y Co., subsidy to... 121 

Montreal Customs Department 49 

Montreal, fire insurance in, from 1880 to 1882 12c 
Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental Railway, 

acquisition by C.P.R 27» 

Moravian and Newfteld S.S 101 

Morocco, commercial arrangements with. ... 89 

Morpeth Barbor on take Erie 46^r 

Murray Canal * 83 

Mc 

McCallum, J. D., dismissal of 110 

McCallum,W.D correspondence concerning 40c 



Naval Reserves and Ordnance Lands. 82 & 82a 

Navigation and Trade, Annual Report 2 

Napanee, Tamworth and Quebec Railway, 

subsidy to 121 

New Brunswick Constitution, &c 70 

do County Court 67 

Newfield and Moravian S.S 101 

New H-arbor, N.S., breakwater 52a 

North Shore Railway, purchase of by G.T.R 78 
North- West Territories, agricultural imple- 
ments imported into 103 to 1036 

Nova Scotia Constitution, &c 70 



Ocean Mail Service , 39 & 39a 

O'Connor, Bon. John 85 

Officers' Staff, " A" and "B" Batteries 56a 

Okanagan and Shuswap Canal 81 

Ontario and Quebec Railway 27» 

do Boundary Award 95 

Ontario Lake, life-saving stations „ 112 

Ontario Maritime Court .- 68a 

Ordnance Lands and Naval Reserves 82 & 82« 

Ordnance for Canada 116 

Ottawa, fire insurance in, from 1880 to 188 2. 12c 



Parliament Library, Annual Report 15 

Pembroke bonus to Canada Central Railway 69 

Penitentiaries, Annual Report. 29 

Penitentiary, British Columbia........ 29a 

Perley, Amos, claim of- 370* 

Petitcodiac to Havelotek, N.B., railway 

between, subsidy to 121 

Pictou and Truro Branch I.C.R ~ 40^ 

Piers and Wharves 46 to 46^r 

do P.E.I., claims for refund 

of their expenditure on .... 46c & 46c? 

Pilots and Pilotage, British Columbia Ill 

Portage Inland 96 

Port Albert Harbor ,.. ~ 46e 

Port Lome, N.S., breakwater ~ 52 

Postmaster-Geneial, Annual Report.. , 3 

Post Office, Montreal 13ft 

Prime Meridian 48 

Prince Edward Island, Constitution, &c. 70 

do Railway 86 

Products of Grain, arid Grain «, 100 

Promotions, Civil Service. 21,13a 

Provencher, J.A.N., Manitoba Indian Super- 
intendent , -.... 123 

Provincial subsidy to Quebec ~ 91 & 94a 

Public Accounts, 1881-82 41, 1 

Public dent incurred forKailwayg,Canals,&c 109 

Public Works, Aunual Report 10 & 10a 

do Dep't. of, telegram expenses. 124 

do . Geu-er&l Lieport, i867 lo 1882 10a 






46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 188$ 



Q No. 

Quaco Lighthouse 57 

Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Co., 

subsidy to. 121 

do Cartridge Factory 99 

do City, fire insurance in, 1880 to 1882.. 12c 

do Frontenac Terrace 113 

do Provincial subsidy 94 & 94a 



Railway Bridge, St. John 47 & 47a 

Railway, Canadian Pacific. 27 to 27r 

Railway Commission, Canadian Pacific 27^ 

do Intercolonial. 406 

Railway, Grand Trunk 76 to 76c 

Railway, Intercolonial 40to40Z 

Railway, Lake St. John 90 

Railway map of Canada 8a 

Railway, P.E.I 86 

Railway Statistics 8a 

Railways and Canals, Annual Report 8 

Railways, public debt incurred for , 109 

Railways, subsidies to 121 

Rainy Lake, steamers for 114 

Rapide Plat Canal 105c 

Receipts and Expenditure charged to Con- 
solidated Fund. 30 

Reciprocity between Canada and the U.S.... 55 
Registered ships in Province of Quebec, &c. 58a 

Renouf, Dr. , account of 40<? 

Reserves, Naval. 82 & 82a 

Returning Officers, list of 33 

Revenue and expenses, I.C. R 40a 

Revision Canadian Statutes ....17 to 176 

Richmond Field Battery 31c 

River du Loup and Biandy Pots Semaphores 74 

River du Loup branch, sale of by G.T.R. 766 to 76c 

do & Riviere Ouelle, wharfs at. 75 

Rocky and Selkirk Mountains, C, P.R. line in 271 

Rolling Stock, Intercolonial Railway 40, 40/402' 

Roumania, commercial arrangements with.. 89 

Royal Military College 56, 56a 

Russell v. The Queen . 80 

Russia, Jewish Refugees from 93c 



Sailors' application for release 72 

Sale of Liquor : 59a, 596 & 61 

Salmon Fishing , 376 

Saltduties 65 

Secretary of State, Annual Report 11 

Sections 14 and 15, C.P.R I7g 

Securities and bonds 25 

Seizures and fines 38 

do at ports of entry „ 38 

Seizures of tobacco 35a 

Selkirk and Rocky Mountains, C.P.R, line in 271 

Semaphores, River du Loup and Brandy Pots 74 

Servia, commercial arrangements with 89 

Shelburne Harbor, log-whistle 66 

Shipbuilding materials, drawback on 45 

Ships registered in the Province of Quebec, 

&c 58a 

Short-term prisoners, claim for refund for 

maintenance by P.E.I. Government. .46c & 46a* 

Shuswap and Okanagan Canal 81 

Spain, commercial arrangements with, 89 

Spellmacheen-Okanajran Canal 81 

S.S. Newjield &&d Moravian. 10i 

Standard Meridian 48 

tatistics and Census 24 



Statistics, Criminal, for 1881 

do railway 

Statutes, Canadian, classifying, &c 17 

tearaboat Inspection 

Steamers for Lake of the Woods and Rainy 

Lake 

Steamship communication with Germany.... 

Stewart, John, volunteer of 1837-38 

St. Anne (Chicoutimi), wharf at 

Ste. Agathe, Man., claims on lot No. 133.... 

St. Jean, banque de 

St. Jean Port Jolie, pier at 46 

St. John, land taken in, for I.C, R 

St. John, N.B., fire insurance in, from 1880 

to 1882 

St. John Railway Bridge 47 

St. John River, N.B 

St. Lawrence and Ottawa Railway, purchase 

of shares by G.T.R 

Subsidies for Manitoba 

Subsidies to certain railways 

Subsidy, Province of Quebec. 94 

Sugar and Syrup imported by vessels 

Summerside Harbor 

Superannuation 21 

Superannuation List 

Supernumerary Clerks, -Montreal Customs... 

Supreme Court, amended rule 

Survey, Hydrographical 

Suspension of Extradition Act :.. 



No. 

14 

8a 

to 176 

7 

114 

71 

31<f 

466 

106 

34 

&46a 

40A 

12c 

& 47a 

122 

76 

108 

121 

& 94a 

586 

54 

to 216 

21a 

49 

63 

- 64 

32 



Tariff between Intercolonial and Allan Mail 

Line - 39 & 39a 

Telegram expenses, Dep't. Public Works... 124 

Thunder Bay, C.P.R. terminus 27r 

Timber Licenses in disputed territory (On- 
tario) ~ 11& 

Tobacco, Canadian * 35 

Toronto, Customs duties refunded at 91 

Toronto, fire insurance in, from 1880 to 1882. 12c 

Trade and Navigation, Annual Report 2 

Trade between Canada, West Indies and 

Brazil. 98 

Troops in Halifax 88 

Truro and Pictou Branch I.C.R 40/ 



Unforseen expenses 22, 42 

Unsettled accounts with the Provinces 20 



Vancouver Island Constitution, &c 70 

Vessels importing sugar, syrup and molasses. 586 
Vessels, on the Great Lakes, disasters to 

Canadian , 58 

Vessels, registered 58a 

Veterans, 1812, deceased since 1875 31 

do ■ surviving 31 & 31a 



do 



widows of. 



31 



w 



Warrants, Governor General's *. 

Weights and Measures 

Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway, pur- 
chase of shares by G.T.R 

West Indies, trade between Canada and 

Wharves and Piers 46 to 

Whitehead, Jos,, Contractor. 






26, 431 



76 

r, 7£ 

27$ 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS, 



ARRANGED NUMERICALLY AND IN VOLUMES. 



•No. i. 



No. 2.. 

No. 3.. 

No. 4.. 



No. 4a. 

No, 5.., 

No. 6... 

No. 7... 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME A. 

Census of Canada, 1880-81, Vol. III. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 1, 

Public Accounts :— For the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Estimates : — Of sums required for the service of the Dominion, for the year ending 30th Juav . 
1884, 

Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion, 
for the year ending 30th June, 1883. 

Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the Dominion, 
for the year ending 30th June, 1&84. 

Further Supplementary Estimates of sums required for the service of the 
Dominion, for the year ending 30th June, 1884. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 2. 

Trade and Navigation :— Tables of, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

? CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 3. 

Postmaster-General :— Report of, for the year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Inland Revenue :— Report, Returns and Statistics of, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 



Supplement No. 1 
Supplement No. 2 
Supplement No, 3 



—Canal Statistics for the season of Navigation, 1832. 
— Weights and Measures, 1882. 
—Adulteration of Food, 1882. 



Return to Address (Senate) ; Return showing — The various drugs and articles 
of food, an analysis of which has been made by the official Analyst, and 
the Reports thereon. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 4. 

Indian Affairs -.—Annual Report of the Department of, for the year ended 31st December, 1882. 
Auditor-General : — Report of, on Appropriation Accounts, for the year ended 30th June, 1882. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 5. 

Marine and Fisheries :— Report of the Department of, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Supplement No. 1 :— Report of the Chairman of the Board of Steamboat In- 
spection, Examination of Mates, &c, fjr the calendar year endea 31st 
December, 1882. ' 

Supplement No. 2: — Report of the Commissioner of Fisheries, for the year 
ended 31st December, 1882. 

1- 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883. 



No. 


8... 


No. 


8o. 


No. 


9... 


No. 


10... 



No. 10a. 

No. 11... 
No. 12... 
No. 12a. 

No. 125. 
No. 12c. 

No. 13... 
No. 13a. 

No. 136. 



No. 14... 

No. 15... 
No. 16... 

No. 16a.. 
No. 17... 

No. 17a. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 6. 

Railways and Canals :— Annual Report of tbe Minister of, for the past fiscal year ended 30th 
June, 1882. 

Railway Statistics of Canada :— Capital, traffic and working expenditure of the railways of 
the Dominion, tor the year ended 30th June, 1882, with a map showing 
the Railways of Canada. 

Militia :— Report on the state of, for the year 1882. 

Public Works :— Annual Report of the Minister of, for the fiscal year 1881-82. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUMES Nos. f & 8. . 
Public Works :— General Report of the Minister of, from 30th June, 1867, to 1st July, 1882. 
CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 9. 

Secretary of State of Canada :— Report of, for the year ended 31st December, 1882. 

Insurance :— Report of the Superintendent of, for 1881. 

Fire and Marine Insurance Companies : Abstract Statements of, for the year 
ended 31st December, 1882. 

Life and Accidental Insurance in Canada : Abstract of, for the year 1882. 

Return to Order : Statement of the toHl amounts of insurance premiums 
against fire collected and losses paH, during each of the years 1880, 1881 
and 1882, in each of the following cities: Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, 
Hamilton, Ottawa, Halifax and SCjohn, N.B. (Not printed.) 

Civil Service :— Report of the Examiners. 

Return of the names and salaries of all persons appointed or promoted in 
the Civil Service during the half-year ending 31st December, 1882, speci- 
fying the office to which each has been appointed or promoted, in com- 
pliance with the Canada Civil Service Act, 1882. 

Return to Order ; Return showing the names, ages and origin of all 
persons employed in the Custtms, Post and Inland Revenue offices at 
Montreal, since 1st May, 1882, to 20th February, 1883, and the salary of 
each of the said employes ; also the names of the employes in the offices of 
Customs and Excise, on the Civil Service List, as entitled to a pension. 
(Not printed.) 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 10. 

Agriculture : — Report of the Minister, for the calendar year, 1882. 

Criminal Statistics for 1881 :— Appendix to the Report of the Minister of 
Agriculture for the year 1882. 

Library of Parliament : — Report of the Librarian. 

Labor in Factories :— Report (Senate) of A. H. Blackeby on the laws regulating labor in the 
State of Massachusetts. 

Report of W. Lukes on factories in England and Continent of Europe. 

Dominion Statutes: — Report of the Commissioner to collect, &c, passed by Parliament since 
Confederation. 

Return to Address ; Statement in detail of all expenditures made in connec- 
tion with the Commission to the Hon. James Cockburn, Q.C., to consoli- 
date the Dominion Statutes, and copies of the Commission, aDd of any 
reports made by him. 



No. 176. 



Return to Address ; Copies t)f correspondence, &c, touching the appointment 
of a Commissioner in connection with the Revision of the Canadian 
Statutes. 

8 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 188S 



Ko. 18... 
No. 19.., 
No. 20.., 

No. 21.., 
No. 21a. 

No. 21b. 



No. 22.., 

No. 23... 

No, 24.., 

No. 25.., 
No. 26... 



No. 27... 



No. 27a. 
No. 27ft. 

No. 27c. 
No. 27rf. 



Dominion Police :— Statement of expenditure during the year 1882. (Not printed.) 

Banks :— Lists of Shareholders of the Canadian Banks. (Not printed.) 

Land Improvement Fund ; — Return to Address; Copies of all letters, &c, between this Gov- 
ernment and the Governments of Ontario and Quebec, from 1st June ff , 
1882, relating to this Fund and unsettled accounts, also a statement show- 
ing the present balances, if any, due to the said Provinces. (Not printed. > 

Superannuation; — Statement of name, &c, of each person superannuated, &c, in accordance 
with the Civil Service Act, 45 Vic, chap. 4, sec 55, sub-sec. 3. 

Return of the names of the persons on the Superannuation List, as on 23r<I 
February, 1883, together with the amount of the annual allowances paid 
each. 

Return (in part) to Order ; Statement showing separately for each year since 
the establishment of the Superannuation Fund : — 1. The number of per- 
sons on the list for the year as entitled to the benefit of the Act. 2. The 
number superannuated during the year under the Act. 3. The number 
retired during the year on a gratuity under the Act. 4. The total 
amount paid into the Fund from the beginning by those who were, during 
the year, superannuated or retired on a gratuity ; distinguishing between 
those whose superannuation was caused by the abolition of office. 5. 
The number of persons on the list, for the year, who died in the servicer, 
— and 6. The total amount paid into the Fund from the beginning by 
those who, during the year, died in the service. 

Unforeseen Expenses: — Statement of payments charged to, by Order in Council, from 1st 
July, 1882, to date, in accordance with the Act 42 V., chap. 2, schedule B» 

Interior: — Annual Report of the Department of, for the year 1882. 

1 

Census and Statistics :— Report, required by sec. 25, of the Census and Statistics Act, of 187% 
of operations and expenses during the calendar year, 1882. (Not printed.^ 

Bonds and Securities :— Detailed statement of, registered in the Department of the Secretary 
of State of Canada, submitted to Parliament, in compliance with the 
Act 31 Vic , chap. 37, sec. 15. (Not printed.) 



Governor General's Warrants :— Statement of, issued ; 
in accordance with the Act 41 V*.. 
account of the fiscal years, 1881-82, aud 1882-83. 



i pHce the last SSsion of Parliament,, 
e with the Act 41 Vic, chap. 7, seo. 32, sub-sec 2, oa 



CONTENTS OP VOLUME No. 11. 

Canadian Pacific Railway:— Return to Resolution; Report giving full information on all 
subjects affecting the Railwar, up to the latest date : 1. The selection of 
the route ; 7. The progress of the work ; 3. The selection or reservation 
of land ; 4. The payment of money ; 5. The laying out of branches : 6. 
The progress thereon; 7. The rates of tolls for nassengers and freight; 
8. The particulars required by the Consolidated Railway Act and axnoad- 
ments thereto, up to the end of the previous fiscal year; 9. Like particulars 
up to the latest practicable date before the presentation of the Return ; 10. 
Copies of all Orders in Council and of all Correspondence between the 
Government and the Railway Company, or any member or officer of 
either, relating to the affairs of the Company. 

Return to Resolution ; Memorandum as to substitution by the Railway of 
Credit Valley Stock for $1,000,000 cash deposit. 

Return to Resolution ; Report of the Company, in account with the Govern- 
ment of Canada, viz. :— Rails Advance Account, Land Grant Bond 
Account, Current Account and Subsidy Account. (Not printed.) 

Return to Resolution ; Schedule of Correspondence as to Canadian Pacific 
Land Grant Bonds. 

Return to Resolution ; Memorandum of the progress of construction of the 
Railway, dated Montreal, ,21st February, 1883. Also, a map of the 
country to be traversed by the Railway. (Not printed.) 
9 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 188a 



No. 21e. 

No. 27/. 
$o. llg. 

No. 27A. 
No. 27«„ 



No. 27i 
No. 27&, 



No. 27?., 



No. 21m 



No. 27w 



Canadian Pacific Railway : — Return to Resolution ; Further Report giving full information, 
not contained in No. 27 ; and also, a plan showing lands for expropria- 
tions of the Railway, extending from the south-westerly side of the 
village of Prince Arthur's Landing easterly to Current River. 

Return to Resolution ; Copies of communications of the Railway on the 
subject of the allotment and conveyance of lands, as they are earned 
under the contract. 

Return to Order ; Statement, in detail, of all sums expended in connection 
with the Canadian Pacific Railway Commission, with dates and names of 
the persons paid, and particulars of the service in respect of which pay- 
ment is made — copy of all correspondence, contracts, accounts or 
arrangements, not already brought down, as to the printing of the 
evidence or Report. 

Return to Resolution ; Map showing the Railway, as located for construction 
between Callander and Algoma Mills, 191 miles. (Not printed.) 

Copies of contracts for the Railway, in terms of section 19 of the Act 37 
Victoria, chapter 14, as follows : — 

Between Hortbn & Son and Her Majesty the Queen, etc., — for the 
supply of 72 tons of iron bolts and nuts. (Contract No. 94.) 

Between Baylies, Jones and Bayliss and Her Majesty the Queen, etc., 
— to supply bolts, nuts and spikes. (Contract No. 95.) 

Between Guest and Company and Her Majesty the Queen, etc,, — for 
the supply of steel rails and steel fish-plates. (Contract No. 96.) 

Between John McDonald and Her Majesty the Queen, etc., — to con- 
struct six combined passenger and freight buildings on 42nd con- 
tract. (Contract No. 97.) 

Between Colin Nichol Black and the Minister of Railways and Canals, 
etc., for the supply of 30,000 tamarack ties, 8'— x 7" x 6" at 25 
cts. each. (Contract No. 98.; 

Return to Resolution ; Location eastern section, Current Creek to Nipigon, 
and freight tariff) western division. 

Return to Order ; Statement of the total quantity of land agreed to be sold 
by the Company, the total price agreed to be paid therefor, during each 
month up to the 1st day of March, 1882, distinguishing between the salea 
of farming lands and ihose of town, village or station lots, woodland, 
mineral, quarry lands and other special sales, and including the quantities 
and prices realized for lands in which the Company became interested by 
agreements in connection with the location of stations. (Wot printed.) 

Return to Resolution ; Communication from W. C. Van Home, General 
Manager, dated Montreal, ISth April, 1883, respecting additional infor- 
mation concerning the line proposed to be adopted through the Rocky 
and Selkirk Mountains. 

Return to Order ; Statement of duty paid by the Company on articles 
imported by them, from the date of their contract until 28th February, 
1883, specifying the ports of entry of such goods, and the amount paid at 
each port. (Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Copies of the official memorandum of the Company, 
dated 12th December, 1S82, describing its position and prospects. The 
advertisement published thereafter by the Company asking for subscrip- 
tions for its increased capital stock; and all memoranda in connection 
therewith. 

Statement showing the amount of the subscribed stock of the Company 
prior to the increase of its capital stock from $25,000,000 to $100,000,000, 
aud th-i amounts paid up on such subscribed stock, with the date of each 
payment in cash, and also the amounts (if any), satisfied by the acqui- 
sition of property or otherwise, specifying in such case the consideration 
therefor and the amount of stock given, and the date. 

Statement of the facts a3 to the acquisition by the Company of the Canada 
Central Railway, the Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental Railway, and 
interest in the Credit Valley Railway and Ontario and Quebec Railway. 

Statement of the various matters required to be returned under the Consoli- 
dated Railway Act, 1879, and amendments thereto. 

Statement of the total sum expended up to the 1st of February, 1883, by the 
Company under their contract. 
10 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 27o. 



No. 27p. 



No. 27 q, 



No. 27r 


No. 28.. 


No. 29.. 


No. 29a 


No. 30.. 


arc 3i.. 



No. 31a. 

No. 316. 
No. 31c . 
No. 31o\ 

No. 31e. 

No. 31/. 
No. 32... 
No. 33... 

No. 34... 



Canadian Pacific Railway :— Return to Order ; Map or maps showing (1) the location ot the 
railway so far as approved or constructed ; (2) its location so far as pro- 

Eosed ,to Government, but not yet approved ; (3) the location of any 
ranches constructed and of any now contemplated by the Company, so 
far as the Government is advised ; (4) the lands set apart for the Com- 
pany but not yet granted ; (5) the lands granted ; (6) the lands applied 
for but not yet set apart. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Statement showing the reduction made by change of 
construction in Contracts A and B, and the amount involved by such 
change ; also, the amount of each payment made to the respective con- 
tractors each month since the letting of the work ; also, all claims 
made by the contractors on each of these contracts, and the date of each 
claim. (Not printed .) 

Papers in relation to Sections 14 and 15, Joseph Whitehead, Contractor. 
(Not printed.) 

Memorandum respecting Thunder Bay and River Kaministiquia. 

Dominion Statutes : — Official Return of the distribution of, being 45 Victoria, 1882. (Not 
printed. ) 

Penitentiaries in Canada :— Report of the Minister of Justice on, for the year ended 30th 
June, 1882. 

Supplementary Return ; Expenditure of the British Columbia Penitentiary, 
for the fiscal year ended the 30th June, 1882. (Not printed.) 

Receipt and Expenditure : — Return to Order ; Return of, in detail, chargeable to the Con- 
solidated Fund, from 1st July, 1882, to 1st February, 1883. (Not printed.) 

Militia : — Return to Order ; Statement of the number of Veterans of 1812 now surviving ; of 
the number who have died since 1875. and of the nfimber of widows of 
deceased who have applied for assistance. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Statement containing the names and residences of all the 
militiamen of 1812 who received their pensions during the last fiscal 
year, as well as the sum given to each of them. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ^Copies of all tenders, accounts, &c, in connection with 
the purchase of blankets for the militia during the recess. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return of all petitions and correspondence with respect to 
new guns for the Richmond Field Battery. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence relating to the application of 
John Stewart, of Woodbridge, one of the Volunteers of 1837-38, for 
assistance, for his services in defence of his country during those years. 
(Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return showing the number of officers, non-commissioned 
officers and men who received instruction in "A" and " B u Batteries 
in each year since their establishment ; the number awarded a certificate 
of qualification in each year, and the entire cost per annum of each 
battery for the same time. 

Return to Address (Senate) ; Copies of all tenders for work at the camp at 
Berthier, in 1832, stating the rates of the various tenders, and the names 
of persons to whom the contracts were awarded, etc. (Not printed.) 

Canadian Extradition Act :— Return to Addre33 ; Correspondence, not already brought 
down, touching the Act, and the suspension of the Imperial Act within 
Canada. 

Returning Officers :— Return to Order; List appointed for the General Election, 1882, 
other than Registrars or Sheriff*, occupations and residences of such 
officers, and a list of the Sheriffs ani Registrars for the Districts in which 
such officers were appointed. 

Banqub db St. Jkan:— Return to Order ; Copie3 of th> returns, annual and monthly, made 
by the Bank since 1875, to the Governm ent ; also, copies of the certi- 
ficates granted by the Treasury Board to the said Bank on going into 
operation. (Not printed.) 
11 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 35... 



No. 35a. 



No. 36. 



No. 36a. 



No. 366. 



No. 36c 



No. 37.. 



No. 37«. 



No. ZU 



No. 37c. 
No. 37a\ 

No. 37c 
No. 38... 

No.*3S... 

No. 39a. 
No. 40... 



nadian Tobacco :-— Return to Order ; Return shewing: 1st. The number of licensed tobacco 
manufactories on 1st February, 1883, in which Canadian leaf is exclu- 
sively used ; 2nd. The quantity of Canadian leaf used in tobacco manu- 
factories since the passing of the Inland Revenue Act of 1880, to 1st 
February, 1883 ; and 3rd. The quantity of cigars and Cavendish pro- 
duced, respectively, since 1st May, 1880, to 1st February, 1883, in manu- 
factories in which Canadian Leaf is exclusively used. (Not printed.') 

Return to Order; Copies of all documents, Ac, relating to a seizure of 
tobacco on the premises of Mr. N. Bernatchez, and other merchants, of 
Montmagny. (Not printed.) 

Coal :— Return to Order ; Return showing the quantity in tons of ooal exported from each 
port in Nova Scotia for the year ending June 30th, 1882 ; Also, for the 
six months ending December 31st, 1882, and the countries to which ex- 
ported ; Also, quantities sent by railway, and by water (separately), to 
any ports of Quebec and Ontario, naming places sent to. 

Coal Lands ; Regulations for the disposal of, approved by His Excellency the 
Administrator of the Government in Council, on tne 2nd March, 1883, 
substituted for those of the 17th December, 1881* 

Return to Order ; Copies for all applications for sales or leases, and all cor- 
respondence or reports touching all leases of coal lands in the North- 
west, not already buought down; and a statement of the payments 
made under any s*ich leases. 

Return to Order; Return giving a full statement of all coal entered ex- 
warehouse free or lor exportation, during the years ending 30th June, 
1881 and 1882. 

Fisheries : — Copies of Orders in Council, instructions and forms for Fishing Bounty, submitted 
in compliance with the Act 45 Vic, cap. 18. 

Return to Order ; Return of leases or licenses to fish on rivers in New Bruns- 
wick and the annual rent received on each ; Also, the number of leases 
or licenses cancelled or surrendered. 

Return to Order; Return of the instructions issued to the Inspectors of the 
Fisheries, as to the enforcement of the Order in Council of 11th June, 
1879, whereby fishing for samJon in Canada, excepting under authority 
from the Department of Marine and Fisheries, was prohibited, the num- 
ber of seizures and informations laid before Justices of the Peace 
against parties fishing without such lease or license ; the number of con- 
victions obtained, etc. 

Certified copy of a Report of the Hon. the Privy Council, on 2nd May, 1883, 
respecting an appropriation of at least $50,000 for bounty to fishermen. 

Return to Order ; Return of all correspondence, etc., had from 1st January, 
1877, to 31st March, 1883, between the Department of Marine and 
Fisheries at Ottawa and the Inspector of Fisheries for New Brunswick 
in reference to the claim of ex-Overseer Amos Perley, of Chatham, for 
services in connection with the Smelt Fishery of Miramichi, in the years 
1876 to 1878. 

Return to Address ; Copies of all Orders in Council in force regulating the 
close season for Lobster Fishing, &c. 

Seizures amd Fines : — Return to Order ; Statement showing the number of seizures made at 
each port of entry in the Dominion during the last fiscal year, and also 
during the six months ended the 31st December 1882, the fines exacted, 
and how disposed of. (Not printed.) 

Ocean Mail Service : — Return to Address (Senate) ; Correspondence, &c, in the possession 
of any department or officer of the Government, relating to the mail 
service between Canada and the United Kingdom, or to the rates of 
freight charged by the line of steamships by which such mail service is 
performed. 

Supplementary Return (Senate) to the preceding. 

Intercolonial Railway: — Return to Order ; Return showing rolling stock purchased during 
the year ended December 31st, 1882, Ac: also, a statement showing 
what has been built during the year in the Government workshops. 
12 



46 Victoria. 



List of S-essional Papers. 



A. 1883 



Intercolonial Railway :— Return to Order; Statement of the revenue and working expenses 
for the six months of each year, ended December 31st, 1880, 1881 
and 1888, under the several divisions. 

Return to Address ; Copies of all Orders in Council, correspondence, &c, 
and the Commission in connection with claims made on the Government, 
arising out of the construction of the railway ; and statement of the 
matters referred to them so far ; and of the remuneration to be paid to 
them and the Secretary of the Commission, Ac 

Return to Order : All correspondence in reference to the removal and dis- 
missal of W.D.McCallum, Chief Train Despatcher at Truro. {Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return of casualties on the railway, where no loss of life 
or personal injuries occurred, from March 1st, 1882, to March 1st, 1883, 
with the respective causes, Ac ; of damage to property, and amount of 
compensation paid, as well as claims unsettled. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Copies of the axcounts rendered by Doctors Lebel and 
Renouf, of St. Gervais, for attendance on an employe of the railway 
named Dionne ; and a statement of the sums to them paid. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return showing the nature of the rolling stock purchased 
for the railway, as contained in the item of $153,853.84 in the Public 
Accounts of 1882 ; where such rolling stock was manufactured, and the 
price paid. 

Return to Order ; Return of all tenders submitted for the construction of the 
freight sheds and warehouses at the railway depot, St. John, N.B. ; the 
names of the several contractors, and the amount of each contract , the 
number and names of the superintendents and overseers, and the amount 
paid for their services. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return of the amounts paid for lands taken on Mill and 
Pond streets, in St. John, N.B., for the railway ; the names of the arbi- 
trators appointed to appraise the land, the compensation paid to them 
and the awards made by them. 

Return to Order ; Return showing the rolling stock purchased for each year 
since the 1st of July, 1878, the nature of such rolling stock, and the 
place where manufactured, &c. 

Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence between the Government of 
Nova Scotia and the Departments of Railways and Public Works, re- 
specting the transfer of the branch railway between Truro and Pictou, 
and with the Halifax and Cape Breton Railway and Coal Company, re- 
specting Eastern Extension Railway matters in Nova Scotia. 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence relating to the steamer run- 
ning in connection with the railway between Campbellton, Gaspe and 
intermediate ports. (Not printed.) 

Papers in relation to H. G. C. Ketchum's claim for overcharge, for the con- 
veyance of rails 1866-67 and '68, Intercolonial Railway. , (Not printed.) 

Public Accounts :— Return to Address ; Copies of all Orders in Council affecting certain 
items in the Public Accounts, for the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 
(Not printed.) 

Unforeseen Expenses :— Return to Address ; Copies of all Orders in Council affecting certain 
items in the statement of payments charged to Unforeseen Expenses, 
referred by the House to the Select Standing Committee on Public 
Accounts, on the 23rd February, 18£3. (Not printed.) 

Governor General's Warrants: — Return to Address; Copies of all Orders in Council 
affectiDg certain items in the statement of the Governor General's 
Warrants, issued during the fiscal years 1881-82 and 1882-83, referred to the 
Select Standing Committee on Public Accounts by the House, en the 23rd 
February, 1883. (Not printed.) 

Baptisms, Marriages and Burials :— General statements and returns of, for certain districts 
of the Province of Quebec, for the year 1882. (Not printed.) 

Drawback on Shipbuilding Materials: — Return to Order; Return of all claims presented 
for drawback on materials used for shipbuilding, for the year ended 
30th June, 1882 ; also, for the six months ended 31st December, 1882. 
(Not printed.) 

13 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 45a. 



tfo. 46... 



No, 46a. 



No. 466. 



No. 46c. 



Drawback on Manufactured Goods :— Return to Order ; Return of ail claims presented for 
drawbacks on goods manufactured for export since 2nd Marcn, 1882, &c. ; 
also, copies of all regulations made by the Department with reference to 
such claims, together with a copy of one allowed claim and the sworn 
declaration thereto of each exporter of boilers, machinery, sewing 
machines or other manufactures of iron. 

Wharves and Piers : — Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence with reference to the 
construction of an addition to the pier of St. Jean Port Jolie, County of 
L'Islet, &c , since the appropriation made for that object during the last 
Session of Parliament. {Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Completing the preceding return by furnishing the date of 
the memorandum closing the said papers. (Not printed.) 



No. 


46d. 


No. 


46e. 


No. 


46/. 


No. 


46^. 


No. 


47.. 


No. 


47a. 


No. 


48.. 



No. 49. 



No. 50. 



No. 51. 



No. 52. 



No. 52a. 



No. 526. 



Return 
pie 



to Order ; Reports, &c, in relation to the construction of a wharf or 
r at St. Anne, on the Saguenay, County of Ohicoutimi. (Not printed.) 

Return (in part) to Address; Correspondence, &c, relating to any claim 
made by the Provincial Government of Prince Edward Island, for a 
refund of their expenditure upon public wharves and piers, and also in 
connection with the maintenance of short-term prisoners in that Province 
since its admission to the Union. (Printed/or Distribution .) 

Supplementary Return to the preceding. (Printed Jor Distribution.) 

Return to Order; Copy of all reports, estimates, Ac, made by the Govern- 
ment Engineers of Port Albert Harbor, and all correspondence with the 
Port Albert Pier Company respecting said harbor. 

Return to Order ; Copies of all reports, &c, made by the Government 
Engineerc of Bayfield Harbor. 

Return to Order; Copies ot all correspondence, appropriations, &c, relative 
to proposed improvement of Morpeth Harbor, on Lake Erie! 

Sr. John Railway Bridge : — Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence with the Govern- 
ment during the year 1882, referring to the construction of a railway 
bridge over the St. John, at St. John. 

Telegram from Shadroch Holly, Mayor of St. John, N.B., with a copy of a 
memorial to the Governor General, in relation to the resolution respect- 
ing the proposed loan to the St. John Bridge and Railway Company. 

Standard Meridian :— Return to Address (SeDate) ; A copy of the memorial from the Royal 
Society of Canada, the Canadian Institute of Toronto, and of any docu- 
ments connected with the memorials, relative tto the representation of 
Canada in the International Conference, to determine a standard meri- 
dian now contemplated by the Congress of the United States. (Printed 
Jor Distribution,) 

Customs Department, Montreal : — Return to Order ; Return of the names of persons in the 
employ of the Customs Department in the City of Montreal, as supernu- 
merary clerks constantly employed for not less than six months previous 
to 1st July, 1882, (Not printed.) 

Drill Shed, Iona:— Return to Order ; Copy of contract, &c, for the building of the drill-shed 
at Iona, Ont., with report of inspection of the same. (NotprinUd.) 

De la Chevrotiere, O.C , Dismissal of :— Return to Address ; Copies of the Order in Council, 
&c, dismissing Mr. Octave C. de la Chevrotiere from his position as 
keeper of a lighthouse situated in the Parish of Lotbiniere, in the County 
of Lotbiniere. (Not printed.) 

Breakwaters: — Return to Order; Return of the advertisement for construction of the 
Breakwater at Port Lome, NS., and the several tenders therefor; the 
party to whom 1 he contract was awarded, and the amount of such 
contract. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copies of all papers, reports of engineers, &c, relating to 
the building of a breakwaterat New Harbor, Guysboro' County, N.S. 
(Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, &c, relating to the building 
of a breakwater on the west side of Liverpool Bay, from 1870 to 1882. 
(Not printed.) 

H 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 62c. 
No. 53... 

No. 54... 
No. 55... 

No. 56... 



No. 56a. 



No. 57... 



No. 58... 



No. 58a 



No. 586. 



No. 59... 



No. 59a. 



No. 596. 



No. 60.., 



Breakwaters :— Return to Order ; Copies of Engineer's report of survey made at Brae 
Prince County, Prince Eiward Island, during last summer, with a view 
to making harbor improvements. (Not printed.) 

Miller, J. A., Judge ;— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence with Mr. J. A. Miller, 
late Justice of the Court of Queen's Bench, Manitoba, prior to his ap- 
pointment, relating to hi3 becoming Justice of that Court, and subse- 
quently to his appointment on the subject of the resignation of his office. 
(Not printed.) 

Summerside Habbor :— Return to Order ; Copy of the Engineer's Report of Survey made at 
Summerside Harbor, Prince County, Prince Edward Island, during the 
last summer, with a view to improving the navigation of said Harbor. 
(Not printed.) 

Reciprocity between Canada and U. S. :— Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence 
between the Governments of Canada and the United States, or any 
Board of Trade in Canada or the United States, upon the question of 
Reciprocal Trade relations between the two countries, on the general 
basis of the Reciprocity Treaty of 1854, since 1878. 

Royal Military College : — Return to Order ; Return of the number of Cadets that have 
graduated at the Royal Military College since its establishment; the 
number who have obtained Commissions in the Imperial service ; the 
number who have been appointed to the permanent Militia Corps ; Also, 
names of any officers appointed to "A" and "B" Batteries of A i iillery 
since February 6th, 1880, who have not graduated at the Royal Military 
College, and of these appointed who graduated at the College. (Not 
printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return showing the name, salary and duty of each officer 
on the Instruction Staff of the Royal Military College, with the dap.} of 
his appointment ; also a Return showing the full staff of officers of " A " 
and "6" Batteries, respectively, with salary and date of appointment. 
(Not printed. ) 

Quaco Lighthouse : — Return to Order ; Return of the tenders for the re-buiiding of the 
Lighthouse at Quaco, New Brunswick, and to whom i he Contract was 
awarded, and the amount of such Contract. (Not prime d.) 

Disasters to Canadian Vessels in the Great Lakes : — Return to Order ; Return of all 
correspondence relating to the disasters which have occurred to Cana- 
dian vessels, navigating the Great Lakes and the Georgian Bay, within 
the past three years, &c. (Not printed.) 

Registered Vessels : — Return to Order ; Statement showing the vessels registered in the 
Province of Quebec ; also, the number of vessels sold and loat between 
1st January, 1873, and 1st January, 1882. (Not printed.) 

Vessels importing Sugar, Syrup and .Molasses : — Return to Order ; Return showing the 
number of vessels with their tonnage, nationality and port of entry, in 
which sugar, syrup and molasses were imported into this country during 
the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1881 ; the quantity of sugar above 14 
D.S., and of a lower grade by each vessel or steamship ; also a like Return 
from 1st July, 1881, to 1st January, 1882. (Not printed.) 

IntoxicatingTiIQUOrs :— Return to Order ; Statement showing the quantities of distilled and 
fermented liquors, imported and manufactured for consumption in Can- 
ada, from 1868 to 1882, computed in Imperial gallons, each Province 
separately, the value of the same and duty paid thereon ; the amount of 
materials used in brewing and distilling alcoholic liquors in the several 
Provinces of Canada during the same years. 

Return to Order ; Copie3 of any petitions from the Province of Quebec, on 
the subject of proposed legislation, as to the sale of intoxicating liquors. 
(Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Copies of despatches, &c, on the subject of Canadian 
and Provincial Laws, as to the imposition of restrictions on the sale of 
intoxicating drinks. (Not printed.) 

Fabre, Hon. Hector : — Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, respecting 
the appointment of Hon. Hector Fabre to the position he now occupies 
in France ; also, statement of his duties and the salary or commission 
paid or to be paid for such services, &c ; also, all reports on the results 
of the mission. (Not printed.) 
15 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 61... 

No. 62.. 

No. 62a 
No. 63... 

No. 64... 

No. 65... 
No. 65... 

No. 67... 

No. 67a. 
No. 675. 

No. 63... 
No. 68a. 

No. 69... 



.No. 70. 



No. 71... 



Sale op Liquor ;- 



Dominion Bailiffs 



-Return to Order; Copies ot all correspondence between any Member of 
the Government and any licensed victuallers, and of all petitions, &c, 
presented by any sach person on the legislation affecting the sale of 
liquors. {Not printed.) 

-Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence with, and petitions 
from municipalities, referring to the appointment of, to convey prisoners 
from ihe county gaols to the Penitentiaries. {Not printed.) 

Supplementary Return to the preceding. {Not printed.) 

Supreme Court, Amended Rule :— Statement of the Supreme Court of Canada, that Schedule 
D, annexed to the rules of that Court, be amended ; and that an allow- 
ance shall be taxed by the Registrar to the duly entered Agent in any 
appeal, in the discretion of the Registrar, to $20. {Not printed.) 

Hydrographtcal Survey: — Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence between any 
person sind the Government, in relation to the hydrographical survey of 
the great lakes, the River and Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the other mari- 
time coasts of Canada. 

Salt Duties : — Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, in the hands of Govern- 
ment, on the subject of duties on salt. {Not printed.) 

Fog-whistle, Shelburne :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, received by 
the Department of Marine and Fisheries since 1st January, 1881, in 
reference to the erection of a fog-whistle at Shelburne Harbor, Nova 
Scotia. {Not printed.) 

County Courts : — Return to Addres9 ; Copy of all correspondence between the Governments 
of New Brunswiek-and the Dominion, in relation to the creation of a new 
County Court in that Province, and the appointment of a Judge thereto. 
{Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Return of cases tried at each of the County Courts of 
the Counties of King3 and Albert, since 1st June, 1882, with the 
amount of verdicts and judgments entered thereon. {Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence between ths Government 
and the County Court Judges of the Dominion, and others, respecting 
the resolution submitted to the House during last Session of Parliament, 
by the late Minister of Justice, on the subject of the proposed increase of 
the salary of such Judges. {Not printed.) 

Maritime Court :— Return to Order : Return showing the cases disposed of, &c,by the Judge 
and several Surrogate Judges of the Maritime Court, since the creation 
of the said court, until the ticst day of February, 1882. {Not printed.) 

Return to Address; Return of all correspondence between the Judge or 
Judges of th- 5 ) Maritime Court of Ontario and the Government, respecting 
the rules, &c, of said court, and the simplification thereof; also, 
copies of any amended or proposed amended rules, since 1st January, 
1882. {Not printed.) 

Canada Central Railway— Pembroke Bonus :— Return to Address; Copies of all corres-JI 
pondence upon the subject of the assumption by the Government of the 
payment of the amount granted by the town of Pembroke, in aid of thei 
Canada Central Railway. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME No. 12. 

Constitutions of C.B., N.S., P.E.I., N.B., B.C., and Vancouver Island ;— Return to Address ;| 
Copies of the charters or constitutions granted Dy the Crown or the] 
Imperial Parliament, to the Provinces of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, 
Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, British Columbia and Vancouver 
Island; also, copies of all Acts, Charters, Royal Instructions, Commis-J 
sions, Orders in Council or Despatches altering or amending the same, 1 
a3 originally granted, or conferring or withdrawing any political rightsi 
or privileges, before or after the granting of such charters. 

Steamship Communication with Germany -.—Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence 
between any Member of the House of Commons, or other persons, anc ; j 
tne Government, in r-laticn to the establishment of direct steajmshij 
communication between Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., Halifax, and* 
German seaports. 

16 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



tfo. 72... 



No. 73. 



No 7L. 



No. 75.. 



No. 76. 



No. 76a.. 



No. 766. 



Sailors' Application for Release :-^-Return to Address; Copies of all correspondence be- 
tween the Secretary of State and the Departments of Marine and Fish- 
eries and of Justice, concerning the application of divers sailors in the 
port of Quebec, praying for a release from confinement, and to return 1» 
sea, &c, at the request of R. Temple, Master of^the British vessel Genii. 
(Not printed.) 

British Canadian Loan and Investment Co.; — Return (Senate)— A list of shareholders, and 
also a statement of its affairs on 31st December, 1832. (Not printed.) 

Semaphores, River do Loup, and Brandy Pots : — Return to Address ; Copies of all corres- 
pondence in relation to ths erection of Semaphores on the wharf at River 
du Loup, in the County of Temiscouata, and oa the Brandy Pots. (Not 
printed.) 

Wharves at River du Loup and Riviere Ouelle : — Return to Order; Copies of all Reports 
made up to this date, respecting the movement of the ice at the wharves 
at River du Loup and Riviere Ouelle. (Not printed.) 

Grand Trunk Railway :— Return to Address ; Copy of all correspondence between the 
Government of Canada and the Company, in relation to the purchasing 
of bonds and shares of the Wellington, Grey and Bruce Railway ; also, 
certain stocks and shares of the Hamilton and North- Western Railway 
Company, and of the St. Lawrence and Ottawa Railway Company; also, 
all copies of correspondence in relation to the purchase or sale of the 
North Shore Railway Company, &c. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order ; Return of all accidents and casualties which have occurred 
on the Railway, or aayof its branches or railways under its control, involv- 
ing either loss of life or injury to person or property, &c. (Not printed.) 

Return to Order; Copy of all correspondence between the Company aid 
the Government, in reference to the purchase or sale of the Riviere du 
Loup Branch of the said railway, now owned by the Government ; also, 
any 'correspondence showing the manner in which the said Company have 
expended or proposed to expend the money so received ; and also, all 
correspondence concerning the Government lien for the debt of 
£Z t 11 1,500, and accrued interest. 



No. 76c. 
No. 77... 

No. 77a. 

No. 78... 

No. 79... 
No. 80. 



No. 81... 



No. 82. 



No. 82a. 



Supplementary Return to the preceding. 

Fifth General Election : — Report on the Dominion elections of 1882, and also each election 
held subsequently thereto up to date. 

Return to Order ; Return showing all sums paid to defray expenses of the 
late Dominion elections, in the different electoral districts. 

Hebert, H., Fraudulent Practices : — Return to Order; Copies of any complaint against 
Hubert Hebert, Chief Station Master at Montmagny, in relation to a 
charge of fraudulent practices affirmed against him by P. B. Casgrain, 
Esq., Member for L'Islet. (Not printed.) 

Wharfage at Digby, N.S. :— Return to Order; Statement of the amount collected for 
wharfage at the public pier at Digby, for each year from 1879 to 1882, 
inclusive. (Not printed.) 

Russell vs. The Queen: — Return to Address; Copies of the judgments in the case of Russell 
and the Queen, in the Supreme Court of Canada and the Privy Council, 
and of the judgments in any Provincial courts of superior jurisdiction, 
or in the Supreme Court of Canada, in all cases raising the right of a 
Provincial Legislature to pass laws affecting the number or character of 
persons licensed to sell intoxicating liquors, or the times of such sale. 

Shusiiwap and Okanagan Canal : — Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, 
in connection with the surveys made in 1882 for the construction of a 
canal between Lakes Shushwap and Okanagan, British Columbia. 

Ordnance^Lands and Naval Reserves: — Return to Order; Statement showing the gross 
amount of receipts from the sale or leasing of Ordnance Lands or Naval 
Reserves, in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, from 1st 
July, 1858, to 1st July, 1882, and the purpose to which the sums so 
received have been applied ; also a Statement showing the several pro- 
perties of which portions have b^en sold or leased, and the number of 
acres in each case. (Not printed.) 

Supplementary Return to the preceding. 

17 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 83... 



Mubbay Canal :— Return to Address (Senate); Copies of all tenders' received for the con- 
struction of the Murray Canal, and all correspondence, &c, concerning 
the same. 



No. 87... 



No. 88... 



No. 89.. 



No. 90... 



No. 91. 



No. 92. 



No. 93. 



No. 93a. 



No. 936.. 



No. 93c. 



No. 94... 



No. 94a.. 



No. 84... Land for Colonization:— Return to Order ; Returns showing the total number of applications 
for land for colonization under plans Nos. 1 and 2 of the Land Regu- 
lations of 23rd December, 1881, up to 1st January. 1883, with the names 
of the applicants, the date of application, and the quantity of land in 
each case applied for. 

No. 85... O'Connor, Hon. John :— Return to Address; Statement of any sums paid, and the arrange- 
ment on which such were paid, to the Hon. John O'Connor, since his 
retirement from office. {Not printed.) 

No. 86... Prince Edwabd Island Railway :— Return to Order ; Return of all reports, estimated cost, 
&c, bearing upon the survey of a proposed branch line of railway, 
between Harmony Station on the railway, to Elmira, east point of 
P.E.I. 

Buoys and Beacons, Lake Huron: — Return to Order; Return of all correspondence with the 
Government within the past four years, copies of contracts and expendi- 
ture, in reference to buoys and beacons in the north channel of Lake 
Huron. {Not printed.) 

Troops in Halifax: — Return to Address ; Copies of all despatches, Orders in Council and 
reports on the subject of the withdrawal of the troops from Halifax. {Not 
printed.) 

Commercial Relations with France, Spain, &c. : — Return to Address ; Copies of all des- 
patches, &c, between the Governments of the United Kingdom and 
Canada ; and between the Government of Canada and the High Com- 
missioner, touching negotiations for commercial arrangements with 
France, Spain or other countries. 

Lake St. John Railway :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence between the 
Government and the Lake St. John Railway Company, in relation to the 
subsidy granted to the said company, and a statement of all sums paid to 
the said company, on account of the said subsidy. {Not printed) 

Custom Duties Refunded at Toronto: — Return to Order ; Return of the names and respec- 
tive amounts of Cus'oms duties refunded at the port of Toronto for the 
last fiscal year, and the articles or commodities upon which the duties 
were collected and refunded. {Not printed.) 

Imports and Exports :— Return to Order ; Return showing the imports and exports from July 
1st, 1882, to January 1st, 1883, and the countries from which imported 
and to which exported. {Not printed.) 

Immigration : — Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, of recent date between 
the Governments of the Dominion and British Columbia, on immigration 
into that Province. 

Jleturn to Order ; Copies of all correspondence between the British Columbia 
and Dominion Governments respecting immigration to British Columbia ; 
also, on the question of Chinese immigration. 

Return to Order ; Return giving the number of Immigrant Agents (other than 
those on the regular and published lists) sent from Canada to Europe, 
who received pay from the Government during the Calendar years of lfc81 
and 1882 ; the names of persons so employed ; the instructions given to 
them, &c. 

Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, in reference to the 
immigration of Jewish refugees from Russia into Canada, and the 
subsequent maintenance and disposal of such immigrants. {Not 
printed.) 

Quebec Provincial Subsidy :— Return to Address : Copy of any representation by the Legis- 
lature of Quebec, on the eubject of an increase of the provincial 
subsidy. 

Return to Address (Senate); All letters, correspondence, &c, which the 
Federal Authorities may have received from the Quebec Government or 
Legislature, asking for "better terms" or an increase of the Dominion 
Subsidy. 

18 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1888 



Ko. 95.. 
No. 96.., 



ft *.«T"? 

No. 97... 



No. 98... 

No. 99... 
No. 100. 

No. 101 . 

No. 102. 
No. 103.. 

No. 103a 

No. 1036 

No. 104. 

No. 105.. 

No. 105a 
No. 1056 
No. 105c 



Ontario Boundary Award :— Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence between the 
Secretary of State and Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario, 
in relation to the award respecting the northern and north-western 
boundaries of that Province, not already communicated. 

Portage Island: — Return to Address; Copies of all correspondence between the Canadian 
Government and the British Government, in reference to the transfer of 
Portage Island, at the entrance of the Miramichi River, to the Govern- 
ment of Canada, together with all reports, &c, in reference to that 
subject. 

Steamer to replace the " Glendon " :— Return to Order ; Return of the advertisement for 
the contract of the building of a steamer to replace the " Glendon " ; 
the several tenders therefor, to whom the contract was awarded, and the 
amount of such contract. {Not printed.) 

Trade betwebs Canada, West Indies and Brazil :— Return to Order ; Copy of the petition 
relative to the trade between Canada and the West Indies, and Brazil, 
signed by the principal fish merchants of the coast of Gaspe and Bay des 
Cnaleurs, and addressed to the Hon. Minister of Finance, with a copy of 
the letter accompanying the said petition. 

Cartridge Factory at Qderec :— Return to Order ; Return showing the cost of the cartridge 
factory at Quebec, since its establishment, and the names and salary of 
all the officers and employes, with the value and quantity of ammunition 
manufactured . {Not p tinted. ) 

Grain and Products op Grain :— Return to Order; Statement showing:— 1st. The amount 
of duties collected between 15th March, 1879, and 1st January. 1883, on 
the cereals comprised under the head of "grain and products or gram " ; 
also the total quantities imported. 2nd. The quantity imported and en- 
tered for consumption in Canada ; also quantity exported during the 
years 1874 to 1882, inclusive. 

S.S. " Newpdjld" and " Moravian " :— Return to Order ; Copies of all correspondence with 
the Minister of Marine and Fisheries concerning the employment of the 
Government steamer " Newfield " in aiding the wrecked steamship 
" Moravian.' ' {Not printed.) 

Mining Regulations :— Copy of those governing the disposal of mineral lands other than coal 
lands. {Not printed.) 

Agricultural Implements, &c, Imported into Man. and N.-W.T. : — Return to Order; State- 
ment of agricultural implements, waggons, sleighs and carriages, 
imported from 30th June to 31st December, 1888, 

Return to Order ; Statement of all agricultural implements, carriages, wag- 
gons and sleighs shipped, in bond, to Manitoba from other Provinces of 
the Dominion, from 1st July to 31st December, 1882. 

Return to Order - } Statement of all agricultural implements, carriages, wag- 
gons and sleighs shipped, in bond, to Manitoba from other Provinces of 
the Dominion, during the fiscal year ended 30th June, 1882. 

Hudson Bay: — Return to Address; Return of all information in reference to the duration of 
navigation, the soundings and the extent to which the Bay freezes over ; 
also, all documents bearing on its probable resources ; also, all reports 
on the mineral resources of the regions about the Bay and the Islands 
therein. 

Grenville and Carillon Canal : — Return to Order ; Copy of the award of arbitrator on 
claim for damages put in by the contractor for the Grenville and Carillon 
Canal, under contract in force in 1871-72, with statement of sums paid 
thereunder. 

Papers in relation to the construction of two locks, and other works, at 
Greece's Point. 

Award of John Page, E3q., Chief Engineer, on the claim of Messrs, Heney, 
Stewart & Co.. contractors for works at Greece's Point, 

Report of J. Page, Esq., Chief Engineer, on the Rapide Plat Canal. 
19 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1883 



No. 106. lH. M, Ships on British Columbia Coast :— Return to Address (Senate); Copies of all cor- 
respondence between the Dominion and Imperial Governments, and 
between the Dominion and British Columbia Governments, on the 
subject of having one or more of Her Majesty's ships, of war stationed 
continuously on the coast of British Columbia. (Not printed. ) 

No. 107.. Government Sdbvey, Lot No. 133, Manitoba :— Return to Address (Senate); Copies of all 
correspondence between the Department of Crown Lands, at Winnipeg, 
or the Department of the Interior, and parties claiming lot No. 133 of the 
Government survey, or any right thereto, situated in the Parish of Ste. 
Agathe, County of Provencher, Manitoba ; also, copies of all Orders in 
Council or of the Department of the Interior, relating to the said lot 
(Not printed.) 

No. 108..h3uBSiDiB8 pob Manitoba :— Return to Address ; Copies of all correspondence, &c, since the com- 
mencement of last Session, in reference to subsidies or grants for Manitoba. 

No. 109. JPuhlic Debt incurred fob Railways, Canals, etc. :— Return to Order; Statement showing 
the amounts oharged in the Public Debt Account of the Dominion of 
Canada, which were expended on railways, canals and navigation secu- 
rities in British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, 
Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia proper, and Cape Breton Island, up 
to 1st July, 1882, &c. 

No. 110. McMillan, J. D., Dismissal of:— Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, &c., relat- 
ing to the dismissal of John D. McMillan from his office as Fishery 
Overseer, and the appointment in his place of David Baker. (Not printed.) 

No. 111. [Pilots and Pilotage, Bbitish Columbia :— Return to Order; Copies of all correspondence, 
&c, between the Government and the Pilotage authorities of British 
Columbia, or any other parties in that Province, on the subject of Pilots 
and Pilotage. 

No. 112. Life-saving Stations:— Return to Order; Copies of correspondence, &c, relative to the 
establishment and management of Life-saving stations on coast of 
Lake Ontario, or other waters, together with such other reports upon the . 
construction and operation of Life-saving stations in other countries as 
may be in the possession of the Government. (Not printed.) 

No. 113.. Frontenac Terrace, Quebec :— Return to Address ; Copies of all documents in relation to 
the granting by the Imperial Government to the Dominion Government, 
and by the latter to the Provincial Government, of various lands, and 
more particularly of the land on which is located Frontenac Terrace, in 
the City of Quebec. (Not printed.) 

No. 114. Lake of the Woods and Raint Lake :— Papers in relation to the construction of steamers 
for Lake of the Woods and Rainy Lake. (Not printed.) 

No. 115. Dacphbnbi, James, Claim of:— Return to Order; Copies of all petitions, &c, in reference 
to the claim of James Dauphenee, of Bridgewater, Lunenburg, for pay- 
ment of claim for refund of expenses incurred by him in discharge of his 
duties as a Fishery Warden of that County. (Not printed.) 

No. 116. Ordnance for Canada: — Return to Order; Copy of contract, correspondence, &c, in con- 
nection with the manufacture of great guns for the Government of 
Canada. ( Not printed. ) 

No, 117. Colonization Grants :— Return to Order; Return giving every form of patent arrangement 
or agreement, &c, between Companies and the Government in regard to 
colonization grants. 

No, 118. [Timber AND Mining Lioenses in Disputed Tebritort, Ontario : — Return to Address ; Copies 
of all correspondence, Orders in Council and papers not already brought 
down, relating to the cutting of timber or to mining on lands within the 
territory now in dispute with Ontario ; also, all correspondence, &c, and 
all permits and licenses granted to make timber ties, telegraph poles and 
saw logs, within the district of Rainy Lake and River, and Lake of the 
Woods and tributary streams. 

No. 110.4 Administration cf Justice, claims op the Provinces :— Return to Address ; Copies of corres- 
pondence, from 1st July, 1867, to date, between the Dominion and the 
Provincial Governments respecting the claims of each of the said Pro- 
vincial Governments, for the repayment of sums expended by them on 
account of the Dominion for the administration of justice ; also, a state- 
ment in detail of the claims settled. 
20 



46 Victoria. 



List of Sessional Papers. 



A. 1888 



No. 120.. 



No. 121. 



No. 122. 



No. 123.. 



No. 124.. 



H. M. S. " Chabtbdis ' ' :— Return to Order 
reports relating to the 
printed. ) 



Copies of all correspondence, expenditure and 
"Charybdis", not already brought down. (Not 



Subsidies to Cebtain Railways :— Report to Council, 14th May, 1883, recommending the grant 
ot a subsidy of $3,200 per mile, for 12 miles, in all $38,400, towards the 
construction of a line of railway between Petitcodiac and Havelock 
Corner, N.B. 

Proposed smbsidy, $3,200 per mile for 80 miles from Canso to Louisburg or 
Sydney, in all $256,000, to the Great American and European Short Line 
Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 49 miles, in all $156,000, to the Inter- 
national Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 36 miles, in all $115,200, to the Caraquet 
Railway Company, N.B. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile, in all $160,000, to the Gatineau Valley 
Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile first 50-mile section out of St. Jerome, in 
all $160,000, to the Montreal and Western Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3, 200 per mile for 28 miles, from Napanee to Tamworth, 
in all $89,600, to the Napanee, Tamworth and Quebec Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 25 miles, from St. Raymond to Lake 
St. John, in all $80,000, to the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway Com- 
pany. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 100 miles from Metapedia to Paspebiac, 
in all $320,000, to the Baie des Chaleurs Railway Company. 

Proposed subsidy, $3,200 per mile for 32 miles (from the Intercolonial Rail- 
way to Mr. Laggan's Mills), in all $102,400, to the Miramichi Valley Rail- 
way Company. 

Proposed further subsidy at the rate of $6,000 per mile, or a further sum, in 
all of $660,000, from Gravenhurst to Callander, 110 miles, to such Com- 
pany as 9hall be approved by the Governor ia Council. 

St. John Rivbb, N.B. :— Return to Address (Senate) ; Copies of all reports, letters, &c, since 
1878, between the Department of Public Works and Mr, J. A. Lyon, or 
any other person, in reference to tke removal of obstructions in the St. 
John River, N.B. {Not printed.') 

Manitoba Indian Agency : — Return to Order ; Report, with evidence, on the condition 
and management of the Manitoba Indian Agency under J. A. N. Pro- 
vencher, the Indian Superintendent of the Manitoba Diitrict, made by 
the Government Commission of Enquiry ; also vouchers dated 25th June, 
1875, for $180 ; 25th June, 1875, for $1,290 ; and 26th December, 1875, 
for $600, signed by one Tremblay, <fcc. {Not printed.) 

Telegram Expenses, Department of Public Works :— Return to Order; Statement of the ex- 
penditure for each month elapsed for the current fiscal year, on telegrams 
charged to various works in the Department of Public Works, and a 
like statement from November, 1881, to 30th June, 1882, inclusive. (Not 
printed. ) 



21 



4$ Tictorfos Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A- 1883 



QE1STERAL REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 



FROM 



30tli JUNE, 1867, 



TO 



1st JULY 1882 

(IN TWO PARTS.) 



PART I. 



ftfofcfl bg Mtx tft f arttatftti. 




OTTAWA: 

PEINTED BY MACLEAN, KOGE.B & CO., WELLINGTON STEEET. 

1883. 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



I3STDEX 

TO THE 

GENERAL REPORT 

OP THE 

MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 

FOR THE 
y 

FIFTEEN TEARS 

FROM 

30TH JUNE, 1867, 

TO 



ist JULY, 1882. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A.. 188S 



INDEX TO REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



EEPORT. 

PAGE 

Introduction i 

Confederated Provinces and North-West Territories, in the Dominion of Canada ii 

Temporary Districts formed in the North-West Territories ii 

Legislation relating to the Public Works of the Dominion of Canada ii 

Division of the Department of Public Works into two Departments iii 

Classification of Public Works iii 

Expenditure on Public Works in each Province and in the North- West Terri- 
tories iv 

EAILWAYS. 

General remarks , 1 v 

Intercolonial Railway , v 

Canadian Pacific Railway v 

Prince Edward Island Railway vi 

Cost of construction, prior to and since Confederation vi 

CANALS. 

Atlantic Ocean and Bras d'Or Lakes. 

St. Peter's Canal vii 

The Richelieu and Lake Champlain Navigation. 

General remarks vii 

St. Ours Lock and Dam vii 

Chambly Canal — . vii 

Champlain Canal vii 

St. Lawrence Navigation. 

General remarks viii 

Lachine Canal viii 

Beaubarnois Canal viii 

Cornwall Canal viii 

Farran's Point Canal viii 

Rapide Plat Canal viii 

Galops Canal ix 

Murray Canal ... jx 

Burlington Bay Canal ix 

Welland Canal ix 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10,) A. 1883 

Montreal and Kingston, via the Ottawa. 

page 

•General remarks ix 

Ste. Anne Lock ix 

■Ordnance or]Military Canals — 

Carillon Canal x 

Chute a Blondeau Canal x 

Grenville Canal » x 

Rideau Canal x 

Upper Ottawa Navigation. 

General remarks xi 

Chats Canal xi 

■Culbute Canal xi 

River Trent and Newcastle District. 

General remarks xii 

Navigable Waters on the Dawson Route. 

General remarks , xii 

Fort Frances Lock xiii 

Enlargement of Canals. 

General remarks xiii 

The St. Lawrence Route xiii 

"The Montreal and Kingston Route, via the Ottawa xiv 

Dimensions op Vessels adapted to each Route and Navigable Draught op 

Water throughout. 

General remark .../ xiv 

Opening and Closing op Navigation on Canals. 

General remark xy 

Cost of Construction op Canals. 

Expenditure prior to Confederation xv 

do since Confederation •••••••• xv 

PROJECTED CANALS. 

Baie Verte Canal xv 

Cedars Canal , xv 

River Tay Navigation Improvements xvi 

Ottawa Ship Canal, Montreal to Lake Huron xvi 

St. Lawrence and Lake Champlain Canal xvi 

Distances, number and size of canals and locks, and draught of water, proposed xvii 

6 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

PAGE 

Province of Nova Scotia — 

Custom Houses, Inland Kevenue and Post Offices xvii 

Penitentiary xviii 

Quarantine Stations xviii 

Marine Hospitals . xviii 

Drill Sheds « xviii 

Province of Prince Edward Island — 

Post Office', Custom House and Savings Bank xviii 

Quarantine Station xviii 

Marine Hospital . « xviii 

Drill Sheds ......* xviii 

Province of New Brunswick—- 

Custom Houses, Post Offices and other offices xviii; 

Penitentiary , xviii' 

Quarantine Stations xix 

Marine Hospitals xix 

Military Buildings xix 

Drill Sheds xix 

Province of Quebec — 

Custom Houses, Inland Revenue and Post Offices. xix 

Penitentiaries xix 

Quarantine Station xx 

Immigrant Sheds xx 

Marine Hospitals xx 

Military Buildings xx 

Drill Sheds xx 

Observatory ,. xx 

Geological Museum xx 

Province of Ontario — 

Federal Buildings at Ottawa : 

Parliament Buildings , xxi 

Government House — Rideau Hall , xxi 

Supreme Court , xxi 

Federal Buildings elsewhere : 

Custom Houses, Inland Revenue and Post Offices xxi 

Military Buildings . xxi 

Drill Sheds.. xxi 

Geological »Museum xxii 

Penitentiary «...,. xxii 

Observatory ,. r xxii 

Immigrant Sheds xxii 

i 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 10.) A.. 1885 



Province of Manitoba — 

PAGE 

Parliament Building xxii: 1 

Lieutenant-Governor's Residence xxii 

Post Office, Custom House xxii 

Dominion Lands Office . xxii 

Immigrant Shed * xxii 

Hut Barracks xxii- 

Penitentiary xxii 

North-TV est Territories— 

Battleford : 

Lieutenant-Governor's Residence xxiii 

Stipendiary Magistrate^ Residence xxiii 

Registrar's Residence xxiii 

Clerk of the Council's Residence xxiii 

Commandant's Quarters xxiii 

Registry Office , : xxiii 

Province of British Columbia — 

Victoria : 

Post Office, Savings Bank, Public Works and Indian Department offices xxiii * 

Custom House, Inland Revenue and Marine offices xxiii 

Marine Hospital xxiii 

Drill Shed xxiii 

J$ew Westminster: 

Penitentiary xxiii 

Post Office, Custom House, Savings Bank and Telegraph Offices ..., xxiv 

Drill Shed^ xxiv 

Cost of Construction of Public Buildings. 

Expenditure prior to Confederation .- xxiv 

do since Confederation xxiv 

rORTS, HARBOURS, RIYERS, BREAKWATERS, &c. 

General remarks , xxiv 

Inland navigation and its connections with the ocean xxv 

Depth of water xxv 

Opening and closing of navigation xxv 

Height of spring and neap tides at various places xxv 

Works executed , xxv 

Expenditure and revenue xxv 

Province of Nova Scotia. 

Number of ports, harbours and rivers improved xxv 

Depth of water available for navigation xxv 

Province of New Brunswick. 

Number of ports, harbours and rivers improved xxv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10..) A. 188S 



Province of Prince Edward Island. 

page; 
Number of ports, harbours and rivers improved xxvi 

Province of Quebec. 

Number of ports, harbours and rivers improved xxvi 

Deepening of ship channel between Quebec and Montreal xxvi 

Docks at the mouth of Eiver St. Charles, in the Harbour of Quebec xxvi 

Graving dock at Levis, in the Harbour of Quebec xxvi 

Expenditure prior to and since Confederation xxvi 

Province of Ontario. 
Number of ports, harbours and rivers improved xxvi 

Province of Manitoba. 

Eiver Assiniboine . t xxvii 

Eed Eiver. , xxvii 

Province of British Columbia. 

Victoria Harbour ■ xxvii 

Graving dock at Esquimalt xxvii 

Cowichan Eiver xxvii 

Cooten ay Eiver xxvii 

Fraser Eiver , ,....: xxvii 

Naas Eiver xxvii 

Skeena Eiver xxvii 

SUEYEYS AND EXAMINATIONS. 
General remarks xxvii 

HAEBOUES— MAEITIME PEOYINCES. 
General remark xxviii 

PEOPOSED HAEBOUE OF EEFUGE BETWEEN EIMOUSKI AND FATHEE 

• POINT. 

General remarks xxviii 

HAEBOUE OF QUEBEC AND GEAYING DOCK AT LEYIS. 

General remarks ". xxviii 

Formation, motion and breaking up of ice xxviii 

LAKE ST. JOHN AND EIYEE SAGUENAY. 
General remarks xxviii 

FLOODS ON THE ST. LAWEENCE BETWEEN QUEBEC AND MONTEEAL. 

General remark xxix 

8 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

SHIP CHANNEL BETWEEN QUEBEC AND MONTREAL. 

PAGE 

General remarks xxix 

Memorandum of Montreal Harbour Commissioners with reference to the debt 
incurred for the works of deepening the channel between Quebec and 
Montreal xxix 

HARBOUR DUES AND TRANSIT CHARGES AT MONTREAL AND 

ATLANTIC PORTS. 

General remarks xxix 

IMPROVEMENT OF THE RAPIDS OF THE ST. LAWRENCE BETWEEN 
MONTREAL AND LAKE ST. FRANCIS. 

-General remark xxix 

New channel made through Batture a Bacot xxx 

HARBOUR OF TORONTO. 
General remark, xxx 

OVERFLOW OF LAKE MANITOBA. 
General remark xxx 

HARBOUR OF VICTORIA, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
General remark xxx 

FRASER RIVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
General remark , xxx 

OBSTRUCTIONS ON NAVIGABLE RIVERS. 
General remark xxx 

EXPENDITURE ON HARBOURS AND BREAKWATERS. 

Prior to Confederation xxxi 

Since Confederation , xxxi 

EXPENDITURE ON IMPROVEMENT OF RIVERS, 

Prior to Confederation . , xxxi 

Since Confederation r xxxi 

DREDGING PLANT. 

List of dredges, tugs, stone-lifters and scows owned and operated by Dominion 

Government in each Province , xxxii 

Oost of dredge vessels, &c xxxiii 

LIGHTHOUSES, BEACONS AND BUOYS. 

General remarks xxxiii 

Expenditure prior to Confederation , xxxiv 

do since Confederation xxxiv 

10 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



ROADS. 

PAGE 

^General remarks xxxiv 

DAWSON EOUTE. 

General remarks xxxv 

Expenditure •»••»*■ xxxv 

BRIDGES. 

General remarks xxxv 

Expenditure on roads and bridges prior to Confederation and since Confedera- 
tion xxxvi 

SLIDES AND BOOMS. 

General remarks xxxvi 

Saguenay River District * xxxvi 

St. Maurice River District xxxvi 

Ottawa Ijttver District xxxvi 

Trent River District , xxxvi 

Tabular statement showing number of pieces of timber which passed through 

the slides and the revenue or deficits of the service xxxvii 

Expenditure prior to and since Confederation..... xxxvii 

PROCLAMATIONS RESPECTING TOLLS AND REGULATIONS ON THE 

VARIOUS PUBLIC WORKS. 

List of the same xxxvii 

TABULAR STATEMENT OF THE FOREST WOODS. OF NORTH AMERICA. 
List of the same xxxvii 

TELEGRAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE. 

General remarks I xxxvii 

Letters of Hon. P . Fortin respecting the telegraph and signal service system 

in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence and the Norwegian telegraph system xxxvii 

Tabular statements, telegraph and signal service xxxvii 

Expenditure prior to and since Confederation xxxviii 

INLAND NAVIGATION, OC3AN ROUTES AND GOVERNMENT LAND 

ROUTES OF CANADA. 

General remarks xxxviii 

Tabulated profiles of the inland navigation of Canada xxxviii 

Ocean routes between Canada and foreign countries xxxviii 

Canadian land routes to the seaboard, Government railways, telegraph lines 

and railway mail routes of Canada .... xxxviii 

Principal over-land mail routes and lines of railway and water communication 

in Manitoba, the North- West Territories and British Columbia xxxviii 

Opening and closing of navigation at the principal ports on the seaboard, in 

the gulf, river and lakes of the St. Lawrence, and on the canals of the 

various routes of inland navigation xxxix 

Time of high water at full and change, and the rise of neap and springtides at 

various places in Canada xxxix 

11 



4C Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



ARRIVALS AND TONNAGE, &o„ OF VESSELS AT THE PRINCIPAL SEA 

PORTS OF CANADA. 

PAGE 

General remark xxxix 

VESSELS BUILT AT THE PRINCIPAL SHIP-BUILDING PORTS OF 

CANADA. 

General remark xxxix 

VESSELS WRECKED ON THE SEA-COAST AND ON THE ST. LAWRENCE. 
General remark xxxix: 

ARBITRATIONS AND AWARDS. 



General remarks respecting appointment and duties of Official Arbitrators.... xl 

Board of Arbitrators placed under control of both the Department of Public 

Works and the Department of Railways and Canals xl 

Statement of claims submitted to the Dominion Arbitrators, with the result of 

the arbitration in each case xl 

PROPERTIES SOLD, TRANSFERRED OR ABANDONED. 
General remark xl 

ORDNANCE AND NAVAL PROPERTY. 

General remarks respecting properties transferred by Imperial to Canadian 
Government, also respecting the classification of War Department pro- 
perties in the various Provinces '. xl 

ACTS RELATING TO PUBLIC WORKS. 
General remark xli 

OLD PLANS, DEEDS, &c, RELATING TO GOVERNMENT PROPERTY. 
General remark xli 

CONTRACTS AWARDED. 
General remark , ... xli 

PLANS AND MODELS SENT TO PARIS EXHIBITION. 
General remark xli 

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE ON PUBLIC WORKS, PRINCE EDWARI> 

ISLAND. 

General remark , xli 

REVENUE FROM PUBLIC WORKS, CANADA. 

General remark , xli 

12 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 10.) A* 1888 

COST OF PUBLIC WORKS, CANADA. 

PAGE 

■General remarks , xlii 

Expenditure on construction in each Province prior to Confederation xlii 

Expenditure on construction in each Province since Confederation xlii 

Expenditure on construction of works which were either transferred to Local 

Governments of Quebec and Ontario, or abandoned to municipal authorities. xlii 

ALTITUDES OF VARIOUS PLACES IN QUEBEC. 
General remark. ., ....... xliii 

ENGLISH AND FRENCH MEASURES USED IN CANADA, &c. 
'General remark xliii 

SYNOPSIS OF GENERAL REPORT, 1867. 
•General remark.. xliii 

COMMISSIONERS AND MINISTERS, &c., OF PUBLIC WORKS. 
General remark xlii 

APPENDICES TO REPORT. 
^General remark xliii 

MAPS, PLANS, &c, APPENDED TO REPORT. 
List of maps, plans, &e xliii 

•REMARK. 

An Alphabetical Index to the various appendices of tb« Minister's Report will 
he found after the last appendix. 



13 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



GENERAL REPORT 

OF 

SIR HECTOR L. L ANGEVIN, 

C. B., K. C. M. G., 

MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS 

OF 
FOR THE 

FIFTEEN YEARS 

FBOM 

30th JUNE, 1867, 

TO 

1st JULY. 188 2. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 



GENERAL EEPOET 



OF THE 

MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS, 



FOR THE 



FIFTEEN YEARS FROM 1st JULY, 1867, TO 30th JUNE, 1882. 



To Sis Excellency the Bight Honourable Sir John Douglas Sutherland Campbell, 
Marquis of Lome, one of Her Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, 
Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and Knight 
Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, 
Governor- General of Canada and Vice-Admiral of the same. 

May it please Your Excellency, — 

The 19th Section of the Act 31 Victoria, 1867, Chapter 12, provides that "the 
Minister shall make and submit to the Governor an Annual Eeport of all the works 
under his control, to be laid before both Houses of Parliament within twenty-one 
days from the commencement of each Session, showing the state of each work and 
the amounts received and expended in respect thereof, with such further information 
as may be requisite." 

In accordance with the above-mentioned section, the report containing a state- 
ment of the expenditure and a summary of the operations of this Department for the 
fiscal year ended on the 30th June, 1882, has been submitted to Your Excellency. 

GENERAL REPORT. 

But the work of the second decennial census of the Dominion of Canada being 

virtually completed, the time has been deemed proper to prepare, conjointly with the 

Annual Report, a General Report giving a statement of the expenses and general 

summaries of the operations of the Department from the 1st July, 1867, to the 30th 

June, 1832. 

10a— a R 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No,10.) A.. 1883i 



CONFEDERATED PKOVINCES. 

Eight Provinces now compose the Canadian Confederation. These are, in the 
order of the dates at which these Provinces were admitted to form part of it: The 
Province of Quebec (1867) ; the Province of Ontario (1867) ; New Brunswick 
(1867) ; Nova Scotia (1867); Manitoba (1870) ; the North-West Territories (1870); 
British Columbia (1871), and Prince Edward Island (1873). 

By Act 39 Vic, Chap. 21, (1876) the District of Keewatin was created. 

By an Order in Council, dated 8th May, 1882, four provisional districts have 
been formed in the North- West Territories, namely : the District of Assi niboia, the 
District oi Saskatchewan, the District of Alberta, and the District of Athabasca. Ill 
these four districts the Department has already carried out certain public works, and 
will hereafter cause others to be executed. (See Order in Council of 8th May 1882, 
at end of volume, pages 1403, 1404). 

LEGISLATION. 

During this period of fifteen years (1867 to 1882), several Acts relating to the 
Public Works were adopted by the Federal Parliament. The list of them will be 
found in Appendix No. 37, pages 1028, 1031. 

Two of these Acts relate especially to the Department of Public Works; they 
are: — 

1st. Act respecting the Public Works of Canada, 31st Yictoria, Chapter 12, 1867. 

2nd. Act respecting the offices of Receiver-General and Minister of Public 
Works, 42nd Victoria, Chapter 7, 1879. 

In accordance with the first of these Acts, the works and duties placed under the 
control of the Minister of Public Works, were classed as follows: — 

1. Canals and other works on navigable rivers constructed by the Provincial 
Governments previous to the 1st July, 1867, were placed under the control of the 
Department of Public Works. 

2. The Department of Public Works shall cause harbours and pi^rs to be con- 
structed with tie authority of the Federal Parliament. 

3. The construction of lighthouses was entrusted to the Department of Public 
Works, but the care of causing the rules respecting them to be observed, of lighting 
and of provisioning them, was left to the Department of Marine and Fisheries. 

4. The slides and booms constructed by the Government to convey timber into 
navigable waters were placed under the control of the Department of Public Works 

5. The control of the larger part of the roads and bridges was transferred to the 
Local Governments, but the construction of the great highways of military and 
interprovincial communication was reserved to the Department of Public Works. 

R 

ii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10 ) A. 1883 



6. Several public buildings were transferred to the Local Governments on cer- 
tain conditions, but the others, which remain in the possession of the Federal Gov- 
ernment, are under the control of the Department of Public Works. 

The control of the Provincial vessels was transferred to the Department of 
Marine and Fisheries. 

That Act remained in force until 1879, and, during this period of twelve years, 
the Department of Public Works had the following works and structures under its 
control : — 

Eailways. 

Canals. 

Public Buildings. 

Ports, Harbours, Eivers, Piers, etc. 

Dredging. 

Slides and Booms. 

Military and Interprovincial Eoads. 

Telegraph Lines. 

In 1879 the Department of Public Works was divided into two Departments. 
The following are the provisions of the above mentioned Act, establishing that 
division : — 

Section 4. — The present Department of Public Works shall be divided into two 
Departments, to be presided over and managed by two Ministers ; one of the said 
Ministers shall bo designated as the " Minister of Eailways and Canals " and the 
other as the " Minister of Public Works." 

Section 5. — "The Minister of Eailways and Canals shall have the management, 
charge and direction of all railways and works and property appertaining or incident 
thereto, and of all canals and works and property appertaining or incident thereto, 
which are or may be, immediately before the coming into force of this Act, under the 
management and direction of the Department of Public Works, and to the same 
extent and under the same provisions, subject to those of this Act; and the Minister 
of Public Works shall have the management, charge and direction of all other public 
works and property which are or may be, at the time aforesaid, under the manage- 
ment and direction of the Department of Public Works, and to the same extent and 
under the same provisions, subject to those of this Act." 

According to the conditions of the preceding section, the Department of Public 

Works has, therefore, had under its control since 1879, the following works and 

structures : — 

Public Buildings. 

Porte, Harbours, Eivers, Piers, etc. 

Dredging. 
10 a-Aj 

R 

iii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10 ) A. 1883 



Slides and Booms. 

Military and Inter provincial Roads. 

Telegraph Lines. 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE. 

Appendix No. 1 (pages 1 — 145) is a detailed statement of expenditure incurred 
for Public Works in each Province of the Dominion, from the 1st July, 1867, until 
the 30th June, 1882. 

This statement covers two great periods, namely : — 

1. The ten years elapsed from the 1st July, 1867, to the 30th June, 18*77 (pageijft 
1-75). 

2. The five years elapsed from the £0th June, 1877, to the 30th June, 188! 
(pages 76—145). 

It is divided into seventeen chapters or headings, treating severally of the follo^Jo 
ing works, etc. : — 

1. Railways (pages 2 — 3 and pages 76 — 77) ; 

2. Canals (pages 4—13 and pages 78 — 85) ; 

3. Public Buildings (pages 14—33 and pages 86—103) ; 

4. Ports, Harbours, and Breakwaters (pages 34 — 43 and 104 — 115) ; 

5. Improvements in Rivers (pages 44 — 47 and pages 115—119); 

6. Dredging (pages 48 — 51 and pages 118 — 123) ; 

7. Slides and Booms (pages 50—57 and pages 122 — 127) ; 

8. Roads and Bridges (pages 56—59 and pages 126 — 129) ; 

9. Surveys (pages 60 — 61 and pages 136 — 137) ; 

10. Arbitrations (pages 60—61 and pages 136 — 137) ; 

11. Telegraph Lines (pages 60 — 61 and pages 128—133) ; 

12. Lighthouses, etc., (pages 62—67 and pages 133 — 137J ; 

13. Various expenditure (pages 66—67 and pages 136 — 137) ; 

14. Amounts contributed by municipalities for certain Public Works (pages 
69 and pages 138—139 ; 

15. Comparative statement of expenditure made for the different Public Woi 
(pages 70 — 71 and pages 140 — 141) j 

16. General abstract of expenditure on Public Works, showing amounts expend 
in each Province (pages 72 — 73 and pages 142 — 143) ; 

17. Expenditure on account of works authorized by special Acts of Parliam 
(pages 7-1 — 75 and pages 144 — 145. 



1 
Ben' 
KA; 



fcrrito 



I- ■ 
lit] 



R 

iv 






8 46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



RAILWAYS. 

The Eailways and Canals of the Government being no longer under the control 
>f the Department of Public Works since 18*79, it will suffice briefly to enumerate 
ihose of which it had the management and control until the preceding date. 

According to the British North America Act, 1867, the railways belonging to the 
Provinces of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, were transferred to the Government 
>f Canada, which has managed them since that time. 

For the details of expenditure and receipts, see Appendix No. 1, pages 2, 3, 72, 
13, 76, 77, and also Appendices Nos. 42, 43. 

INTEECOLONIAL KAIL WAY. 

By virtue of th*> provisions of the Act, 31 Vie, chap. 13, a commission was ap- 
pointed, by an Order in Council, dated the 11th December, 1868, to construct and 
;ake the management of the Intercolonial Eailway. 

The whole line was opened to traffic on the 1st of July, 1876, and the Govern- 
ment has managed it since that time. For the details of expenditure and receipts, 
jee Appendix No. 1, pages 2, 3, 72, 73, 76, 77, and also Appendices Nos. 42, 43. 

COMMUNICATION WITH THE NOETH-WEST AND CANADIAN PACIFIC 

EAILWAY. 

In consideration of the annexation, then in contemplation, of the North-West 
Territories, the Government of the United Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada 
jaused surveys to be made with the object of deciding upon the best means of estab- 
ishing a direct line of communication between Lake Superior and those Territories4 
With the information obtained from all those surveys, a line of communication by 
[and and by water was chosen in 1868, extending from Fort William on Lake Super- 
ior, to Fort Garry on Eed Eiver. 

Works of improvement were made on this line between that time and 1879, 
when the construction of the Canadian Pacific Eailway was practically decided on. 
See Appendix No. ly, pages 646 to 649, and Appendix No. 30— Part I, pages 825 to 827. 

Parties of surveyors formed to decide upon the most favorable route for the con" 
struction of a railway built on Canadian territory, and terminating at the Pacific 
Ocean, began their labors in June, 1871, and the report of the Chief Engineer of the 
survey was submitted to Parliament in the following year. 

Since that time, those surveys were continued every year, and the Government, 
in 1875, caused works to be begun, which were continued till 1880. 

In 1881, the Federal Parliament adopted the Act relating to the Canadian Pacific 
Railway, 44 Vic, chap. 1, (sanctioned on the 15th February of the same year). Ac- 



€6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1885 ! 



cording to the terms of that Act and on the conditions therein specified, the Cana- 
dian Pacific Eailway Company undertakes to construct all the line. For the details- 
©f expenditure and receipts, see Appendix No. 1, pages 2, 3, 72, 73, 76, 77, and also. 
Appendices Nos. 42, 43. 

PKINCE EDWAED ISLAND EAILWAY. 

This line was transferred to the Federal, Government at the time of the admission 
of Prince Edward Island into the Confederation (1st July, 1873). The Federal* 
Government caused the line to be completed, opened it for traffic on the 1st of April, 
1875, and has managed it since that time. For the details of expenditure and 
receipts, see Appendix No. 1, pages 2, 3, 72, 73, 76, 77, and also Appendiceal 
Nos. 42, 43. 

COST OF CONSTRUCTION. 

The Government expenditure on construction of railways up to 30th June, 1882J 
amounts to $90,729,662.48, subdivided as follows : — 

Government Eailways : — 

Prior to Confederation $13,881,460 65 

Since do 55,491,071 82 

— $69,372,532 47 

Subsidized Eailways : — 

Prior to Confederation $20,264,800 01 

Since do 1,092,330 00 

~ $21,357,130 01 

Total $90,729,662 48 

See Appendix No. 43. 

For details respecting Canadian Eailways, see Part IV of Appendix No. 30. 

CANALS/ 

The Canals of Canada nave been constructed for the purpose of overcoming th< 
natural obstructions which have existed on the following routes of inland navigation] 
namely : — 

1. The St. Peter's Canal. 

2. The Eichelieu and Lake Champlain navigation. 

3. The St. Lawrence navigation. 

4. The Montreal and Kingston, via the Ottawa. 

5. The Upper Ottawa navigation. 

6. The navigation of the Eiver Trent and Newcastle District. 

vi 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

7 . The navigation of the rivers and lakes on the Dawson route between Prince 
Arthur's Landing, Thunder Bay, on the north shore of Lake Superior, and 
the north-west angle of the Lake of the Woods. 

See tabulated profiles describing each route in Part I. of Appendix No. 30. 

See also Appendix No. 31, for opening and closing of Navigation on each route. 

ST. PETER'S CANAL. 

This Canal unites St. Peter's Bay on the shore of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, with 
the lakes of the Bras d'Or. It cuts through an isthmus half a mile in length and 
runs into the Atlantic Ocean. For details, see statement No. 4 of Appendix No. 30, 
Part I, at page 199. 

THE EICHELIEU AND LAKE CHAMPLAIN NAVIGATION. 

This line of navigation extends from Sorel, at the mouth of the Eiver Richelieu, a 
point 46 miles below Montreal, and 114 miles above Quebec, as far as the head 
of Lake Champlain ; from the latter point, the line is prolonged by the Champlain 
Canal and the Hudson River, as far as New York, 457 miles from Montreal. 

The Canadian Canals on this route are, in ascending order, the St. Ours and the 
Chambly. 

ST. OURS CANAL. 

The St. Ours Canal consists of a lock 200 feet in length, and 45 feet in breadth, 
with 7 feet of water on the sills, and extension piers above and below the lock, to- 
gether with a dam across the Richelieu, 14 miles above Sorel. 

CHAMBLY CANAL. 

The Chambly Canal is 12 miles in length; it extends from the village of Cham- 
bly to the city of St. John's, 104 miles above Montreal, and comprises 9 locks of 
118 x 23J feet, with 7 feet of water on the sills. The breadth of the canal at bottom 
*s 60 feet. 

CHAMPLAIN CANAL. 

The Champlain Canal commences at Whitehall, 238 miles from Montreal, connects 
with the Erie Canal which terminates at Albany, 311 miles from Montreal ; it com- 
prises 23 locks, 100 x 18 feet, with 5 feet of water on the sills. The breadth of the 
canal at bottom is 50 feet. The Champlain and Erie Canals are in the State of New 
York. 

For further details respecting expenditure and description of route, see Appendix 

No. 1, and statements 12, 13, of Appendix No. 30, Part 1, pages 810 to 813. 

vii 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



THE ST. LAWRENCE NAVIGATION. 

The Canals cm this route are those of Lachine, Beauharnois, Cornwall, Farran's 
Point, Rapide Plat, Galops, Murray, Burlington Bay and Welland. 

The length of each canal, the number and dimensions of the locks, the depth of 
water on the lock sills, the length of the navigable reaches between the canals and 
the navigable draught of water throughout, are shown in statements 1 to 12 of 
Appendix No. 30, Part I, pages 7 §6 to 810. 

For details respecting expenditure, see Appendix No. 1. 

LACHINE CANAL. 

The Lachine Canal extends from the city of Montreal as far as the village of 
Lachine, and enables vessels to avoid the St. Louis Rapids > the first rapids which pre- 
vent the ascending of the River St. Lawrence, a distance of 986 miles from the Strait 
of Belle-Ile. 

BEAUHARNOIS CANAL. 

The Beauharnois Canal is situated on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, 15 J 
miles from the head of the Lachine Canal, and extends into the land for a distance of 
11J miles, uniting the Lakes St. Louis and St. Francis, and thus avoiding the Cascades, 
Cedars and Cot eau Rapids. 

CORNWALL CANAL. 

The Cornwall Canal enables vessels ascending the River St. Lawrence to avoid the 
Long Sault Rapids. There is a distance of 32f miles, on Lake St. Francis, between 
the head of the Beauharnois Canal and the Cornwall Canal. 

FARRAN'S POINT CANAL. 

The Farran's Point Canal enables vessels ascending the river to avoid the Farran's 
Point Rapids ; descending vessels can shoot these rapids with ease and in perfect safety. 
From the head of the Cornwall Canal, to the lower end of that of Farran's Point, the 
distance upon the St. Lawrence is 5 miles. 

RAPIDE PLAT CANAL. 

The Ra pide Plat Canal enables vepsels ascending the river to avoid the Flat 
Rap ds ; those descending can shoot these rapids without danger. There is a navi- 
gable channel often and a half miles between the head of the Farran's Point Canal 
and the Flat Rapids. 

viii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1383 



GALOPS CANAL. 

The Galops Canal enables vessels to avoid the rapids of Pointe aux Iroquois, 
Pointe a Cardinal and the Galops. From the head of the Eapide Plat Canal to the 
foot of that of the Galops, the St. Lawrence is navigable for a distance of 4J- miles. 

MURRAY CANAL. 

The opening of a canal 6 J miles in length, and with 11 feet in depth of water, 
uniting the head of the Bay of Quinte with Lake Ontario, has been authorized by 
Parliament ; the line has been decided upon and the works are in course of execu- 
tion. There is no lock on this canal. See Appendix No. 30, Part I, of this report, 
and also pages 45 to 4*7 of General Report of 1867. See also Report on Railways and 
Canals, 1882, at page 40. 

BURLINGTON BAY CANAL. 

Burlington Bay Canal, mentioned here in geographical order, is only a single 

cut through a sand bank which has formed between Lake Ontario aud Burlington 

Bay, and is navigable for vessels drawing ten feet of water. It enables vessels to 

reach the port of Hamilton, and afterwards the town of Dundas, by way of the Des- 

jardins Canal. For details see Appendix No. BO, Part I. of this report, and also pages 

34 and 35 of the General Report of the Commissioner of Public Works, published in 
186*7. 

WELLAND CANAL. 

The Welland Canal connects Port Dalhousie on Lake Ontario, with Port Col- 
borne on Lake Erie; it is 26f miles in length, and is fed by Lake Erie and by the 
Grand River, It has a total rise or lockage of 326J feet, and 26 locks. For details 
see Appendix No. 30, Part I, of this Report, and also pages 24 to 34 of the General 
Report published in 1867. See also report of Chief Engineer of Canals, 1880. 

MONTREAL, OTTAWA AND KINGSTON NAVIGATION. 

Upon this line of navigation are the St. Anne, Carillon, Chute a Blonieau, Gren 
ville and Rideau Canals. 

For details see Statement No. 14 of Appendix No. 30, Part I, pages 814 to 817. 

STR. ANNE CANAL. 

The Ste. Anne Canal, known as the Ste. Anne Lock, enables vessels to overcome 
the rapids at the village of St. Anne, between lie Perrot and the head of the Island 
of Montreal; this lock is situated at a short distance below the portion of the River 
Ottawa which forms the Lake of Two Mountains, and is about 23J- miles above the 
port of Montreal. 

ix 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



A new lock is now in course of construction, and will shortly be completed at 
Ste. Anne. 

The least depth of water. on the sills will be nine feet. 

.CABILLON CANAL. 

The Carillon Canal enables vessels to avoid the rapids of that name. Between 
Ste. Anne Lock and the Carillon Canal there is a navigable channel of 2T 
miles on the Lake of Two Mountains and the Biver Ottawa. Since the date of the 
last General Eeport of 1867, a new canal three-quarters of a mile in length, with two 
locks, has been built ; at the upper end of the canal a dam has been also constructed 
across the Biver Ottawa, in order to raise the water between the Carillon and the 
Grenville Canals; on the south side of the river there is a slide through the dam for 
the passage of timber. 

CHUTE A BLONDE AU CANAL. 

The Chute a Blondeau Canal is cut through the solid rock. There is only one 
lock, and it is only used by vessels ascending the river ; for in descending it, all pass 
through the rapids. 

Since the new canal at Carillon and the dam across the Ottawa have been con- 
structed, this canal has become almost useless. Between the Carillon and Chute a 
Blondeau Canals the navigable channel is five and three-eighths miles long. 

GBENVILLE CANAL. 

The Grenville Canal is about 56 miles from the city of Ottawa, and enables 
vessels to avoid thelLong Sault Bapids. This canal has been enlarged; three new 
locks at the upper end have been built, and two others at the lower end are in course 
of construction. 

When the enlargement of the Ste. Anne, Carillon and Grenville Canals is fully 
completed, there will be eight new locks of 200 x 45 feet, and the depth of water on 
the sills and in the intermediate sections of the Biver Ottawa will be not less than 
nine feet during low water. 

From the head of La Chute a Blondeau as far as the foot of the Grenville Canal, 
the navigable channel is one mile and three-eighths in length. 

RIDEAU CANAL. 

The Bideau Canal unites the Biver Ottawa to the lower extremity of Lake 
Ontario, at Kingston, and is only a conversion of the Bideau and Cataraqui Bivers 
into a continuous navigable channel. The Bideau falls into the Ottawa and the other 
into the St. Lawrence. These two water-courses are united by a connecting reach 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 

near their respective sources. The Eiver Ottawa is navigable from the head of the 
Grenville Canal, as far as the foot of the Rideau Canal, city of Ottawa, a distance of 
56 miles. On this line of navigation there are forty-seven locks of 134 x 34 
feet ; the depth of water is five feet on the lock sills and the navigable draught 
through the canal is four and a- half feet. For further details see tabulated profile 
No. 14 of Appendix No. 30, Part 1, pages 816, 8H. 

For expenditure on each canal, see Appendix No. 1. 

UPPER OTTAWA NAVIGATION. 

Steamboat navigation on various portions of the river above the city of Ottawa 
extends as far as the mouth of the River Mattawan, a total distance of 192 miles, of 
which 120 miles, between Ottawa and the Joachim Rapids, are navigable for vessels 
of six feet draught of water, and 50 miles, between the Joachim Rapids and the 
mouth of the Mattawan, for vessels of from three and a half to two feet draught, dur- 
ing low water. 

For details respecting this route, see statements Nos. 29 to 32 of Appendix No, ' 
30, Part I, pages 838 to 84 7. 

The principal obstructions to a continuous line of navigation are the rapids of:— - 

The Chats 33 miles above the city of Ottawa. 

Portage du Fort 55 " " 

Calumet 66 

Joachim 143 

Rocher Capitaine 160 " " 

Deux Rivieres 170 " " 

The principal works undertaken or executed for the improvement of the naviga- 
tion are the following : — 

CHATS CANAL. 

This canal was designed to connect the navigable waters of Lake Chaudiere or 
Lacjles Chenes with those of Lac des Chats, for vessels with a draught of 7 feet. The- 
distance from the city of Ottawa to the Chats Canal is about S3 miles. 

It was commenced in August, 1854, and discontinued on 15th November, 18j6. 

For expenditure see Appendix No. 1. 

For details respecting work see Appendix No. 30, Part I, page 841, and the 
General Report of 1867, pages 79 to 82. 

CULBUTB CANAL. 

This canal connects navigation between the village of Bryson, at the head of the 

Great Calumet Falls, about 66 miles above the city of Ottawa, and the village of 

Aberdeen, at the foot of the Joachim Rapids, a total distance of 77 miles. 

xi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



It comprises two combined locks of 200 x 45 feet each, with 6 feet of water 
on the sills. 

The work was commenced in 1873 and completed in 18*76. 

Two submerged dams are now being constructed for the purpose of raising the 
-water in the north channel of the OtLawa, from Bryson to Culbute. 

One of the dams is in the north channel below Bryson, near the foot of Calumet 
Island; the other is in the south channel towards the head of the same Island. 

For details respecting work and cost of the same see Appendices Nos. 1 and 30. 

THE NAVIGATION" OF THE RIVER TRENT AND NEWCASTLE 

DISTRICT. 

The River Trent falls into the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario, at Trenton, 6*7 
miles above Kingston. 

Ascending from Lake Ontario to Lake Scugog we meet with the following rivers 
and lakes : — 

Bay of Quinte, River Trent, Rice Lake, River Otonabee, Clear Lake, Buckhom 
Lake, Pigeon Lake, Sturgeon Lake, River Scugog and Lake Scugog. 

From the mouth of the Trent up to Port Perry at the head of Lake Scugog, 
the distance is 190 miles, and the total rise 570.27 feet. 

The elevation of Lake Scugog above tide-water at Three Rivers, according to 
the levels given in statement No. 12, Appendix No. 30, is 810.27 feet. 

The locks, dams and slides which have been constructed on the River Trent route 
are intended to improve navigation and facilitate the floating of timber. 

From Trenton to Port Perry, 160 J miles only are navigable and 29£ are un- 
navigable. 

The draught of water on this line of inland navigation, varies from four to five 
feet, the locks are 133 feet in length and 33 in breadth, the depth of water 
on the lock sills is five feet. 

The navigation has lately been improved and is now being extended by the 
construction of a short canal and two locks at Fenelon Falls ; the latter were com- 
menced in 1882. 

For details respecting this route, see tabulated profile, No. 15, in Appendix 
No. 30, Part I, pagee 818 to 823. 

NAVIGABLE WATERS ON THE DAWSON ROUTE, COMPRISING- 
THE FORT FRANCES LOCK. 

The Dawson Route extends from Prince Arthur's Landing, Thunder Bay, Lake 
Superior, to the city of Winnipeg, a total distance of 451 miles. 

xii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10,) A. l 

Tt comprises 147 miles of road and portages, and 304 miles of river and lake 
navigation with a draught of water not less than from 3 to 4 feet. 

A description of this route will be found in Appendix No. 19, at pages 646 to 653, 
and in statements Nos. IT, 18, 19 of Appendix No. 30, Parti, pages 825 to A 828. 

FORT FRANCES LOCK. 

This lock is situated near the outlet of Rainy Lake, at a distance of 237 miles 
north-westward from Prince Arthur's Landing and 215 miles south-eastward from 
Fort Garry, (Winnipeg), via the Dawson Route. 

The object sought by the construction of this work was to connect the -naviga- 
tion from Kettle Falls, at the head of Rainy Lake, with that of the Lake of the 
Woods as far as the north-west angle of that lake, a distance of 164 miles, for vessels 
of T feet draught of water. 

The lock was commenced on the 14th June, 18T5, and completed in 18T9, with 
the exception of the gates. 

The works requisite to obtain a navigable draught of T feet throughout, have not 
been carried out. 

Appendix No. 30, Part I, contains a full description of this work, and shows the 
cost of the works executed, at pages 826, 827. 

ENLARGEMENT OF CANALS. 

The report of 1871 mentions the appointment, under the Great Seal of Canada, 
under date 16th November, 1870, of a commission charged to make inquiries into the 
best means of improving our canal system. On the 21st February, 1871, the com- 
mission addressed to the Secretary of State a report containing its recommendations 
in this respect. That report was published. 

Since 1871, Parliament has voted each year the sums necessary to carry out the 
recommendations contained in that roport. 

Long and minute surveys and examinations have been made to decide the dimen- 
iions of the enlarged canals, of the locks, etc., etc., and the work of enlargement has 
been in course of execution since 1873. 

ENLARGEMENT ON THE ST. LAWRENCE ROUTE. 

In 1871 the scale of navigation on the St. Lawrence route was fixed throughout 
at a depth of 12 feet of water, instead of £9 feet in the Lachine, Beauharnois, Corn- 
wall, Farran's Point, Rapide Plat and Galops Canals, and instead of 10J feet in the 
Welland Canal . The dimensions of the looks were fixed at 270 feet between the 
gates and at 45 feet in width, instead of 200 x 45. The least breadth of the canals at 

bottom was fixed at 100 feet. 

xiii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

In 1873 the enlargement was authorized to be carried out on this scale, upon the 
Xachine and Welland Canals, and subsequently on the Cornwall Canal". 

In the early part of 1875 the Government gave orders to place the foundations 
of all permanent structures on those parts of the works not then under contract at 
a depth corresponding to 14 feet of water on the mitre sills of the locks. 

The works on the Laehine, Cornwall and Welland Canals have been proceeded 
with in accordance with these directions. 

The enlargement of the Laehine Canal is expected to be completed this year. 

On the Cornwall, the two lower locks have been completed ; the enlargement at 
the upper end will probably be commenced in the course of the present year. 

On the Welland Canal, the works of enlargement are nearly completed for a 
draught of 12 feet of water, excepting at the point where the canal is carried by an 
aqueduct over the Chippewa Eiver, where the draught is limited for the present to 
11J feet for vessels using their own motive power ; the draught of vessels in tow, 
however, may be 12 feet. 

For details respecting the enlargement of the St. Lawrence Canals, see the 
Eeport of the Chief Engineer of Canals, dated 16th February, 1880, and published the 
same year. 

ENLAEGEMENT ON THE MONTEEAL AND OTTAWA KOUTE. 

According to the scale of navigation adopted fcr the portion of the route between 
Montreal and Ottawa, the dimensions of the new locks of the Ste. Anne, Carillon and 
Grenville Canals, have been fixed at 200 x 45 feet, the depth of water on the sills at 9 
feet, and in the canals at 10 feet. 

The smallest dimensions of the old locks are 190 x 45 feet at Ste. Anne, 126 J x 32 J 
on the Carillon Canal, 130J x 32J on the Chute a Blondeau Canal, 106J x 19 on the Gren- 
ville Canal, and the depth of water on the sills of the locks throughout is 6 feet. 

The new locks at Ste. Anne, and the two new locks at the foot of the Grenville 
Canal, will probably be completed during the present year. 

The scale of navigation on the Eideau Canal has not been altered ; the locks are 
134 feet in length and 33 feet in breadth ; the depth of water is 5 feet on the lock 
sills, and the navigable depth through the canal, only 4J feet. 

DIMENSIONS OF VESSELS. 

The dimensions of vessels capable of passing through the St. Peter's, St. Law- 
rence, Sault Ste. Marie, Eichelieu, Champlain, Erie, Ottawa and Eideau Canals, are 
shown, together with the size of the smallest locks and the navigable draught of water, 

in Statement No. 16, of Appendix No. 30, Part 1, page 824. 

xiv 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A, 188$ 

OPENINQ AND CLOSING OF NAVIGATION. 

The opening and closing of navigation on the different routes above described, 
and on the Champlain, Erie and Sault S,te. Marie Canals, are given in Appendix No. 
31, from the time they were first recorded up to the present year, so far as it was 
possible to ascertain them. 

COST OF CONSTRUCTION. 

The total cost of construction of all the canals, from their commencement to tho 
30th June, 13S2, amounts to $48,410,983.42. 

Sub-divided as follows, viz. : — 

Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation.., $18,797,913 90 

Since do 23,447,564 27 

$42,245,478 17 

Other than Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation $4,459,664 67 

Since do 1,705,840 58 

6,165,505 25 

Total $48,410,983 42 

For details respecting cost of construction and revenue, see Appendices Nos 
1 and 42, 43. 

PROJECTED CANALS. 

Besides the canals above enumerated, the following are still prospective: — 

BAIE YERTE CANAL. 

The Baie Yorte Canal would cut the isthmus which divides Cumberland Basin, 
at the head of the Bay of Fundy, from the Baie Yerte, on the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 
It has been the subject of special reports : in 1872, by Mr. G. F. Baillairge ; in 1873, 
by Mes-rs. Keefer, Gzowski and Page; in 1876, by a commission composed of the 
Honorable John Young, president ; the Honorable W. P. Howland, C.B., and Messrs. 
J. W. Lawrence and Peter Jack. See Appendix No. 30, pages 830 to 833. 

There is at present a proposition to substitute for a canal a railway for marine 
transport, and a Company has been incorporated for the construction of the railway. 

CEDAKS CANAL. 

Surveys were made in 1873-74 and 1875-76 on the north shore of the St. 

Lawrence, between Lakes St. Louis and St. Francis, in order to determine the pro- 

xv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



bable cost of a canal according to the scale of navigation recommended by the Canal 
Commissioners in 1871, viz. : Locks, 270 x 45 feet, with 12 feet of water on the sills; 
bottom width of canal, 100 feet. 

Surveys were also made from 1874 to 1876 on the south shore, in order to ascer- 
tain the probable cost of enlarging the Beaufrarnois Canal to the same dimensions. 

The reports and estimates in both cases are under the consideration of the 
Department of Eai I ways and Canals. 

For further details in connection with Cedars Canal survey, see Appendix No. 
30, Part I, pages 835, 83b*. 

TAY CANAL. 

A description of the improvements contemplated in connection with this canal 
will be found in Appendix No. 30, at page 837, and in the .Report of the Minister 
of Railways and Canals for 1881-82, page 34. 

OTTAWA SHIP CANAL, MONTEEAL TO LAKE HURON VIA LAKE 
NIP1SSING AND FRENCH RIVER. 

Surveys were made in connection with this projected work by Walter Shanly,. 
C.E., in 1857, and T. C. Clarke, in 1859. See Appendix No. 30, pages 838 to 847. 

Reports and estimates were furnished by each of these Engineers ; they are fully 
explained in the General Report of 1867, at pages 79 to 83. 

ST. LAWRENCE AND LAKE CHAMPLAIN PROJECTED CANAL. 

From 1847 to- 1856 various lines were surveyed and reported on by Messrs. 
Mills, Jarvis, Gamble and Swift, Civil Engineers, in connection with this projected 
work, from Longueuil (opposite Montreal), from Caughnawaga, Lake St. Louis, and| 
a point on the Beauharnois Canal, — to Lake Champlain. 

The line recommended by Mr. J. B. Mills in his report dated the 19th February,! 
1848, and subsequently approved by Messrs. Gamble and Swift, extended from 
Caughnawaga (opposite Lachine) to the Chambly Canal, which it was proposed tol 
enlarge for a distance of 8J miles up to the port of St. John's, which was selected as] 
the proper terminus on Lake Champlain. The total length of this line, including th< 
8f miles of the Chambly Canal to be enlarged, is 32J miles. The locks were designee 
to be 200 x 45 feet, with nine feet of water on the sills, and the canal was to be sup-j 
plied by water from Lake Champlain. 

Mr. Mills estimated the probable cost of the work at $1,814,408. 

Mr. J. B. Jarvis, in a report dated 13th February, 1855, proposed a canal witl 

entrances at Caughnawaga and St. John, and a navigable feeder from the Beauhs 

xvi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A, 1883 

nois Canal with a summit level of 37j feet above Lake Champlain. The locks were 
to be 230 x 36, with ten feet of water on the sills. 

He estimated the cost of the work at $4,267,890. 

For further details see General Report of 1867, pages 68 to 70. 

For details respecting distances, number and size of canals, draught of water 
proposed, and probable cost, see tabular statements and memoranda, Nos. 29 to 31, in 
Appendix No. 30, Part I. 

Appendix No 30 herein referred to, contains tabulated profiles and memoranda 
respecting the inland navigation of Canada and its connections, the ocean routes 
thence to foreign countries, the Canadian inter-provincial highways and land routes to 
the seaboard, the Grovernment railways and telegraph lines, the railway mail routes 
©f Canada, and also the principal overland mail routes and lines of railway and 
water communication in Manitoba, the North-West Territories and British Columbia. 
This Appendix has been registered as No. 33859 in the Record Office of the 
Department. 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The Dominion G-overnment possesses Public Buildings in all the Provinces 
"which form the Confederation. These buildings may be classed as follows : — 

Parliament Buildings and Governors' Residences, 

Custom Houses, 

Examining Warehouses and Inland Revenue Offices, 

Post Offices, 

Penitentiaries and Prisons, 

Quarantine Stations and Immigrant Sheds, 

Marine Hospitals, 

Military Buildings and Drill Sheds, 

Observatories and Museums. 

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 

CUSTOM HOUSES, INLAND REVENUE AND POST OFFICES. 

The Dominion Grovernment possesses Custom Houses at Halifax and at PictoUi 
At Halifax, the offices of Inland Revenue and of the Receiver-General, as well as 
the Provincial Museum, are located in the same building as those of the Customs. 

At Pictou, the offices of Weights and Measures, of the Marine and of Inland 

^Revenue, are also placed in the same building as those of the Customs. 

xvii 
10 a— b 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



PENITENTIARY. 

The Federal Government having established the Penitentiary for the Maritime 
Provinces at Dorchester, N.B., the old Penitentiary is no longer used as a prison. 

QUARANTINE STATIONS. 

The Federal Government has three establishments of this nature in Nova Scotia, 
in the following towns and localities, viz. : Lawlor's Island near Halifax, Pictou, and 
Bunker's Island at Yarmouth. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

These are situated at Lunenburg and Bunker's Island, and another is to be built 
«,t Pictou. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

The Government possesses Brill Sheds at Halifax, Lunenburg, Belltown, Windsor, 
Eiver Philip, Amherst, and Maccan on the Hebert Eiver. 

For a description of these Public Buildings see Appendix No. 2, pages 148-150. 

PEOVINCE OF PEINCE EDWAED ISLAND. 

The Post Office, the Custom House and the Savings Bank are placed at Charlot- 
tetown, in the building where the Provincial Government Offices were installed before 
the entrance of the Province into the Confederation ; there is also a Quarantine Station 
at Southport. 

The Marine Hospital is at Souris. 

There are Drill Sheds at Charlottetown and Georgetown (Appendix No. 2, pages 
150-151.) 

PEOVINCE OF NEW BEUNSWICK 

CUSTOM HOUSES, AND POST OFFICES, ETC. 

The Federal Government is in possession of Custom Houses at Fredericton, St . 
John, Chatham, Miramichi and Newcastle. In the greater number of these build- 
ings, other offices of the Federal Government are also placed . 

PENITENTIARIES . 

In 1376 the Federal Government resolved to close all the Penitentiaries through 

out the Maritime Provinces, and to replace them by a single establishment built in a 

central position. The choice fell upon Dorchester, N.B. The Penitentiary for tho 

Maritime Provinces is erected upon a ground plot of 619 acres, situated three-quarters 

of a mile from Dorchester Corners, upon the road leading to Memramcook. It is a 

stone building, all the partition walls of which are brick, except in the cells where 

xviii 



46 Victoria. • Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

they are stone. The offices are located in the main building. The construction of 
it was begun in 1876. The prisoners are lodged in a cell wiag of the building which 
contains 120 cells. Another wing is being built with 200 cells. Each of the Keepers 
has his residence on the land surrouuding the Penitentiary ; here also are erected 
the workshops, the bakery, &c. (See the complete description in Appendix No. 2, 
Pages 156, 157.) 

The establishment was completed and occupied in 1878-79, and additions wer* 
made to it in 1880-81. 

The Federal Government also possesses a Prison at St. John, which was the old 
Provincial Prison, and was vacated after the completion of the Penitentiary at Dor- 
chester. 

QUARANTINE STATIONS. 

The Dominion Government possesses two in the Province ; one is located at 
Partridge Island, near St. John, and the other at Middle Island, two miles below 
Chatham on the Miramichi Eiver. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

One is now being built at St. John, on the site of the old hospital, a building 
which is falling into ruin. The Dominion Government has throe others, severally 
located at St. Andrew's, Miramichi and Sackville. 

MILITARY BUILDINGS. 

The Dominion Government possesses military buildings at St. John, St. Andrew's 
And Fredericton. (Appendix No. 2, pages 151-158). 

DRILL SHEDS. 

These are at St. John and St. Andrew's. 

PEOVINCE OF QUEBEC. 

CUSTOM HOUSES, INLAND REVENUE AND POST OFFICES. 

The Dominion Government has Custom Houses in the following cities and 
places : — Quebec, Three Rivers, St. John's, St. Regis, Dundee and Montreal. 

At St. Johns, the Post Office is located in the same building as the Customs. 

In the other cities and localities above mentioned, these offices, as well as those 
of the Inland Revenue, and the Agencies of the Minister of Marine and the Receiver- 
General, are in separate buildings. 

PENITENTIARIES. 

The Provincial Penitentiary is erected at St. Vincent de Paul. It was described 

at length in the Report of 1867, but since that time considerable additions and 

xix 
10 a— bJ 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



improvements have been made to it. Between five and six hundred prisoners can be- 
lodged there. (See description, Appendix No. 2, pages 171-113.) 

QUARANTINE STATION. 

The only Quarantine Station in the Province of Quebec is situated at Grosse He, I 
33 miles below the city of Quebec. 

IMMIGRANT SHEDS. 

These are situated at Levis, Sherbrooke and Montreal. The Immigrant Shed at 
Levis was burnt in the autumn of 1882, but is to be rebuilt. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

The Dominion Government possesses two in the Province ; one is located at 
Chicoutimi, the other at Quebec. 

MILITARY BUILDINGS. 

In 1856 and 1870-71-72, the English Government transferred nearly all the-i.;. 
military buildings they possessed in Canada to the Canadian Government. 

For Ordnance Property, including the Ottawa Canals, transferred by the Imperial 
to the Canadian Government, prior to 1st July, 1867, see Appendices Nos. 58 and 60, 
in General Report of 1867, pages 444 to 450, inclusive, and also Appendix No. TO of 
same Eeport, pages 566 to 569, inclusive. 

For Ordnance Property transferred and classified since 1st July, 1867, see 
Schedules for 1869, 1870-71, 1871-72, and 1879, recorded in Department of the 
Interior, as per Appendix No. 36J. 

Those of the Province of Quebec are situated at Temiscouata, Levis, Quebec, 
Three Rivers, Sorel, Chambly, St. John's, He aux Noix and Montreal, Laprairie, Cas- 
cades, Cedars, Coteau du Lac, etc. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

These are situated at Quebec, Montreal, Sherbrooke, Robinson of ComptOBj 
County, St. Andrew's, Carillon and Cushing. 

OBSERVATORY. 

The Dominion Government possesses an Observatory at Quebec. 

GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The Geological Museum at Montreal was transferred to Ottawa, and the built 
ing sold to the Provincial Government. (See Appendix No. 2, pages 163 — 177.) 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 
FEDERAL BUILDINGS AT OTTAWA. 

PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS. 

These Buildings were fully describe! in tha Report of 1887. Since that time 
various additions and improvements bave been made to them. 

The Library was completed in 18*7*7- The eastern and western blocks, where the 
offices of the several Ministers are located, have been improved, and the western 
block has been extended since 1867. 

The grounds which surround these Buildings have also been laid out in a suit- 
able manner. (See Appendix No. 2, pages 178 — 180.) 

GOVERNMENT HOUSE — RIDEAU HALL. 

The residence oi the Governor General is located on the estate situated at New 
Edinburgh and purchased by the Government from the heirs McKay in 186*7. 
Various improvements have since been made, viz. : the construction of a residence for 
the Secretary, a gate lodge, laundry, gasometer house, conservatory, vinery, 
skating rink, stables, outbuildings, fencing, drainage and water works. See Appendix 
No. 2, pages 180,181. 

For description of works anterior to 1867, see Appendix No. 23 of General Re- 
port of that year. 

SUPREME COURT. 

The Supreme Court is held in the Government building at the westera 
corner of Government Square. (Appendix No. 2, pages 179-180.) 

FEDERAL BUILDINGS ELSEWHERE. 

CUSTOM HOUSES, INLAND REVENUE AND POST OFFICES. 

The Government has Custom Bouses at Ottawa, Kingston, Belleville, Toronto 
Hamilton, St. Catharines, Dalhousie, Brautford, Guelph, London and Windsor. 

In the greater part of these buildings other Government offices are also located, 
•uch as the Post Offices, Inland Revenue, &c, (fee. (See Appendix No. 2, pages 
177—204.) 

MILITARY BUILDINGS. 

The Government possesses important military buildings at Preacott, Ottawa, 
Kingston, Toronto and Niagara. (See Appendix No. 2, pages 182—203.) 

DRILL SHEDS. 

There are 109 of these buildings in Ontario; they are generally constructed of 
wood ; forty-three of them are eastward and sixty -six westward of Toronto. (See 
Appendix No. 2, pages 181—202.) 

xxi 



16 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1888 



GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

This building is situated on Sussex street, Ottawa. It was formerly occupied by 
the Military from 1867 to 18*71, and was afterwards made use of as the Clarendon 
Hotel until 18*79-80, when it was purchased, extended, improved and fitted up as a 
Geological Museum. 

The Geological Museum was transferred from Montreal to Ottawa in 1881. (See- 
Appendix No. 2, at page 181.) 

KINGSTON PENITENTIARY. 

This building was commenced in 1833, and was placed, by ah Order in Council,. 
ander the Department of Public Works on the lTth of November, 18*74: Since that 
time considerable additions and improvements have been made to it, and from six 
to eight hundred prisoners can now be lodged there. (See description in Appendix 
No. 2, pages 18*7—189; and General Eeport, 186*7, at pages 541—593.) 

OBSERVATORY. 

It is established at Toronto. For description, see General Eeport of 186*7,~at 
page 258, Appendix No. 23. 

IMMIGRATION BUILDINGS. 

There are two sheds, one at Toronto and one at London. (See Appendix No. 2,. 
pages 195 and 202.) 

PEOYINCE OF MANITOBA. 

The Dominion Government possesses the following buildings at Winnipeg : — 
Post Office, Custom House, Dominion Lands Office, and an Immigration Shed and 
Hut Barracks (at Fort Osborne). A Parliament Building and residence for thel 
Lieutenant-Governor are now in progress of construction. (See Appendix No. 2, 
pages 204, 205.) 

MANITOBA PENITENTIARY, STONY MOUNTAIN. 

This building is 14 miles from the City of Winnipeg ; it was commenced in 1873 
and completed and occupied in 187*7. 

It contains sixty-seven cells for prisoners besides the apartments for the War 
den and officials, and is provided with bath rooms, water closets, boiler and fuel 
rooms, dining hall and kitchen, &c. ; the building is heated by steam. 

Two single guards' dwellings, a school room, ice house and other buildings have 
been erected, and others are in course of construction. (See Appendix No. 2, at pag<| 

506.) 

xxii 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10 ) A. 1885 

NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 
BATTLEFORD. 



The Federal Government have constructed the following buildings at Battle- 
ord : — 

Lieut.-G-overnor's residence, a wooden building on a stone foundation. 

Stipendiary Magistrate's residence, a wooden building on a stone foundation. 

Registrar's residence, a wooden building on a stone foundation. 

Clerk of the Council's residence, a wooden building on a stone foundation. 

Commandant's quarters, a wooden building on a stone foundation. 

Registry Office, a brick building on a ston3 foundation. 

These buildings were completed and ready for occupation in 1878. 

For description of each building, see Appendix No. 2, at pages 206 — 207. 

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
VICTORIA. 

The Federal Government buildings at this place are : 

The Post Office, Savings Bank, Public Works and Indian Department Offices in 
lie same building, which is of stone and was erected in 1873-74 : the front wall had 
3 be re-built in 1879-80, owing to the disintegration of the stone. 

The Custom House, Inland Revenue and Marine Offices in one building. 

This is a brick building on a stone foundation ; it was placed under contract in 
873-74 and completed in 1875-76. 

The Marine Hospital, capable of accommodating forty patients ; it was com- 
lenced in 1872-73 and completed in 1874-75. This is a stone building. 

The Drill Shed, which is situated on the south-west side of Menzies street. 

For description of buildings in British Columbia, see pages 207, 208 of Appen 
ix No. 2. 

NEW WESTMINSTER. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY. 

This is a building with walls of stone backed with brick, containing sixty-seven 
ells for prisoners besides rooms and offices for the officials, and for the heating 
pparatus, etc. 



It was commenced in 1874-75 and completed in 1877-78. 

R 

xxiii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1885 



POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE, SAVINGS BANK AND TELEGRAPH OFFICE. 

These are to be provided for in one building which is to be of brick with a stone 
foundation. 

Work was commenced in 1881 and is still in progress. 

DRILL SHED. 

This is a wooden building, which is situated on Mackenzie street. 

See page 208 of Appendix No. 2 for description of buildings, New Westminster. 

For details of expenditure on the different buildings of each Province and of the 
North-West Territories, see Appendix No. 1. 

EXPENDITUKE ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

The expenditure on construction of Buildings up to the 30th June, 1882, 
amounted to $16,549,334.32. 

Subdivided as follows : — 

Prior to Confederation. 

On buildings which became the property of 

the Dominion on 1st July, 1867 $4,183,460 89 

On buildings subsequently transferred to Local 

Governments of Quebec and Ontario 5,053,099 81 

$9,236,500 70 

Since Confederation. 

On buildings belonging to the Dominion : 

Government expenditure $7,286,432 12 

Other than Government expenditure 9,933 33 



$7,296,365 45 
On buildings belonging to Local Govern- 
ments of Quebec and Ontario 16,408 17 

$7,312,773 62 



Total $16,549,334 32 

See Appendix No. 43, pa^es 1203, 1272. 

POETS, HAEBOUES, EIVEES, BEEAKWATERS, &c. 

The importance of this division of the Department of Public Works is explained 
in the Introduction to the General Eeport of the Commissioner of Public Works, 
1867 (pages 1—5.) 

R 

xxiv 



46 Victoria. bessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 



In the vast region which extends from the coast of the Atlantic to that of the 
Pacific Ocean, between the lines 42°, 45J° and the North Pole, it may be said that 
Nature has spread great rivers and sheets of water, as well as ports where vessels 
may lie to or seek refuge. But it being man's task, sometimes, to wrestle with the 
works of nature in order to bring them to perfection, it has been necessary, from the 
very beginning of the!history of the country, to improve the natural harbours and the 
great watercourses. 

This work had already assumed considerable proportions under the Union (1841 
— 1867) ; as may be seen by the above mentioned Keport. (Introduction, pages 84 
98.) 

At first the municipalities were charged with these improvements. Afterwards, 
the expenses of these works going beyond their resources, the Steamboat and Rail- 
way Companies came to their assistance ; in time, the Government granted them 
supplies for this purpose. Finally, the Government took the control of the greater 
part of these works, which it has placed under the direction of an important division 
of the Department, 

In the present Keport, no less than twenty-one Appendices, from No. 3 to No. 
18, No. 30 to No. 32, are devoted to this subject. 

No. 30 contains a complete description of the inland navigation and its connec- 
tions with the ocean. (See pages 191 to 904.) 

No. 31 shows the depths of the water, and the dates of the opening and closing 
of the navigation each year in the different ports. 

Nos. 4 and 31J give the heights of the spring and neap tides at various places on 
the shores of the Ocean, the Gulf and Eiver St. Lawrence, together with other infor- 
mation respecting various harbours. See pages 314 — 315 and 930 to 935.) 

Appendix No. 3 gives a report of the works executed in the ports and harbDurs, 
and upon the rivers and bays of the different Provinces. (See pages 209 to 291.) 

Appendices Nos. 1, 41, 42, *.3, 43J- show details of expenditure and revenue. 

PEOYINCE OF NOYA SCOTIA. 

In this Province one hundred and two (102) ports, harbours and rivers have been 
improved. 

The depths of the channels in these harbours and rivers vary according to their 
importance, or rather according to the tonnage of the vessels which navigate them. 
Some are merely harbours of refuge for fishing vessels. 

Appendix No. 3, pages, 210—230. 

PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 

In this Province thirty-four (34) ports, harbours, bays and rivers, of various 
lepths and capacity, have been improved. (Appendix 3, pages 230 — 239.) 



xxv 



46 'victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 

PEOVINCB OF PEINCE EDWAED ISLAND. 

In this Province nineteen (19) ports, harbours, bays and rivers have been im- 
proved. (Appendix 3, pages 239 — 244.) 

PEOVINCB OF QUEBEC. 

Here we enter the Gulf and Eiver St. Lawrence. 

The Province numbers eighty-four (84) ports, harbours, bays and rivers where 
improvements have been made. (Appendix 3, pages 244 — 258.) 

The principal improvements made and in progress, in connection with navigation 
in this Province, are the deepening of the ship channel between Quebec and Montreal, 
and the harbour of Montreal, and also the docks at the mouth of the Eiver St. Charle3 
and the Graving Dock at Levis, in the harbour of Quebec. 

The former are fully described in Appendix No. 10, pages 452 to 436, and the 
latter in Appendix No. 6, pages 330 to 333. 

The expenditure on these works, up to 30th June, 1882, is as follows, viz : — 

Quebec Harbour improvements, in mouth of Eiver St. 

Charles $1,405,000 00 

Levis Graving Dock 350,000 00 

Ship Channel between Quebec and Montreal (pre- 
viously included in cost of canals) $2,870,075 66 

Montreal Harbour Improvements : — 

Works executed at the expense of 
the Harbour Commissioners 
of that city : — 

Prior to Confederation $ 43,538 61 

Since Confederation 1,560,918 65 

$1,604,457 32 
Add — Expenditure by Govern- 
ment prior to Confederation. 521,100 00 
Do since Confederation 747 25 

Total expenditure Montreal Harbour.$ 2,126,30 4 57 
See Appendix No. 43, pages 1216—1217. 

PEOVINCE OF ONTAEIO. 

In this Province sixty (60) ports, harbours, bays and rivers have been im- 
proved. (Appendix 3, pages 258—272.) 

Mention will be made of the Harbour of Toronto further on. Full details 
respecting this harbour and its improvements will be found in Appendix No. 14, 
pages 516 to 534. 

R 

xxvi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



PEOVINCE OF MANITOBA. 

The Government has caused improvements to be made to the EJver Assiniboine 
and Eed Eiver. (Appendix 3, page3 272 — 213.) 

PEOVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

The Dominion Government has made and continues to make improvements in 
the Eivers Cowichan, Com tnay, Fraser, Naas and Skeena, and in the Harbour of 
Victoria. (Appendix 3, pages 273 — 276.) 

A graving dock is being built at Esquimalt under the terms of an Imperial Order 
in Council of the 16th May, 1871, and Dominion Acts 37 Victoria, chapter 17, and 
43 Victoria, chapter 15. The Imperial Order in Council of the 16th May, 1871, 
admitting British Columbia to the Confederation, provided for the guarantee by the 
Dominion, of " the interest for ten years from the date of the completion of the 
works, at the rate ot 5 per centunY per annum, on such sum, not exceeding £100,000 
sterling, as may be required for the construction of a first-class graving dock at 
Esquimalt," and by Act 37 Victoria, chapter 17, of the Dominion, it was provided 
that in lieu of such guarantee advances were to be made from time to time by the 
Governor in Council, out of the Consolidated Eevenue Fund, upon certificates of the 
progress of the work; such advances not to exceed, in the whole, $250,000. 

The Act 43 Victoria, chapter 15, further provided that such advances were to 
be made on the certificate of the Engineer of the Provincial Government, counter- 
signed by the agent of the Dominion Government in British Columbia. 

Under these Acts the Government of British Columbia invited tenders for the 
work, and awarded the contract for its execution to Messrs. F. B. Mc^'amee & Co., 
and on account of that contract payments upon certificates have been made by this 
Department to the extent of $47,660.22. 

The Government /)f British Columbia has since cancelled Messrs. McNamee 
& Co's. contract, and by advertisement, dated 31*t October, 1382, called for tenders- 
for the completion of the dock. The Department has not been made aware whether 
another contract has been awarded as yet. 

SURYEYS AND EXAMINATIONS IN THE DIFFERENT PROVINCES CONNECTED WITH IMPROVE* 

MENT OF HARBOURS AND RIVERS, 

Several other ports, harbours, bays and rivers require improvements, with a 
view to which the Government caused and continues to cause surveys and examina- 
tions to be made in a number of places, the list of which will be found in Appendix 3, 
pages 276—284, in Appendix 4, pages 292—318, and in Appendix 5, pages 320—327. 

In pages 285-290 will be found a table of the piers and wharves belonging to the 

Government in the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 

xxvii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The Appendices numbered 4 to 18 are so many reports on the improvements 
made and projected in the principal ports, harbours, and rivers of Canada from 1867 
to 1882. To give an idea of them, it will be sufficient to mention the title and to 
point out briefly the subject of each. 

Harbours — Maritime Provinces. 

Appendix No. 4. — Report on various Harbours of the Maritime Provinces. 

This Report was submitted in the month of May, 18*72, and shows the nature and 
probable cost of the projected improvements, while specifying whether they are 
-within the province of the Federal or Local Governments. (Pages 291—318.) 

Proposed Harbour of Refuge between Rimouski and Father Point. 

Appendix No. 5. — Report on proposed Harbour of Refuge between Rimouski and 
Father Point, upon the southern bank of the River Saint Lawrence, below Quebec > 
by Mr. G-. F. Baillarge. 

By this Report it appears that Pointe a Pouliot and Father Point, are the only 
two sites where this Harbour can be fixed, between the points named, on the south 
shore of the St. Lawrence below Quebec. (Pages 320 — 327.) 

Harbour of Quebec and Graving Dock at Levis. 

Appendix No. 6. — Report on the improvements in Quebec Harbour, the Graving 
Bock at Levis, and on the operations of the Lifting Barge, since Confederation, by 
the Quebec Harbour Commissioners. 

By the Act thirty-eight Vic. cap. fifty-six, the Quebec Harbour Commissioner! 
were authorized to borrow an amount which, wiih the funds voted by the Canadian 
Parliament, or granted by the Imperial Government, was to be employed in con- 
structing a Graving Dock in Quebec Harbour. 

The site was chosen at St. Joseph de Levis, by an Order in Council dated in the 
month of May, 1877. On the seventeenth of August, 1878, the Commissioners awarded 
this undertaking to Messrs. Larkin, Connolly & Co., and the works were to be com- 
pleted in 1882. (Pages 339—333.) 

Appendix No. 7. — A Report respecting the formation, motion, breaking up, etc., 
of the ice and the prevailing carrents and wiads in the Harbour of Quebec, as affect- 
ing the location of the projected Graving Dock. (Pages 335 — 312.) 

Lake St. John and Rever Saguenay. 

Appendix No. 8 is a Report, or rather a series of reports, respecting the Like 

St. John and Saguenay regions, and the works executed and in progress therein. 

The Lake St. John region seems destined to become one of the most important of thel 

Province of Qaebec, and its geographical and geological features, its climate, agricul-l 

tural resources and population are so nnny subjects which present an interest] 

xxviii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 138J 



which the future will only render more vivid, according as this beautiful region shall; 
become developed. This Eeport then will become, later on, an important document 
to refer to. 

It is divided into three parts : — 

1. Lake St. John and Tributaries. (Pages 346—365.) 

2. Eiver Saguenay and Tributaries, etc. (Pages 368 — 388.) 

3. Lake St. John, Eiver Saguenay and Hudson's Bay ; notes, etc. (Pages 390 
— 446.J 

Floods on the St. Lawrence between Quebec and Montreal. 

Appendix No. 9. — This Appendix is the Eeport of a Commission appointed, in 
October, 1873, to enquire into the cause of the floods which occur periodically at 
certain places between Montreal and Quebec, following the course of the Eiver St. 
Lawrence, in order to inform the Government as to the best means to be taken to 
remedy them. (Pages 448—450.) 

Ship Channel between Quebec and Montreal. 

Appendix No. 10. — This Appendix is upon the deepening of the ship channel 
between Quebec and Montreal, through the St. Lawrence Eiver. It is a report by 
the Montreal Harbour Commissioners on the works which they were authorized to 
undertake by the Act 31, Vic. cap. 60 (1873) and the Order in Council, dated the 
31st May, 1873. (Pages 451—456.) 

Appendix No. 11. — This is a Memorandum of the Montreal Harbour Commission- 
ers, with reference to the debt incurred by the said Commissioners for the works of 
deepening the Channel between Montreal and Quebec. This memorial was submitted 
to me on 31st March, 1879. (Pages 457—462.) 

Harbour Dues and Transit Charges at Montreal and Atlantic Ports. 

Appendix No. 12. — This is a Eeport of the Montreal Board of Trade and Mon- 
treal CJorn Exchange Association, on the Harbour dues and transit charges at Montreal 
and at the Atlantic Ports. 

This Eeport suggests the reduction, and, in some cases the abolition, of these 
dues, in order to attract the commerce of the West to Montreal. (Pages 463—493.) 

Improvement of the Eapids of the St. Lawrence between Montreal and 

Lake St. Francis. 

Appendix No. 13.— This is a Eeport, with estimates, on the cost of improving 

the navigation of the most dangerous parts of the Eiver St. Lawrence, at the Eapids 

between the Lakes St. Francis and St. Louis, and between the latter lake and the 

Harbour of Montreal, in order to facilitate the descent and ensure the safety of vessels 

shooting these rapids. v 

xxix 



4G Victoria* Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

Since this Report was made, a new channel has been made in the Batture a 
Bacot, between the Cedars and Cascades, where, during low water, there was only a 
depth of six and a-half feet. 

The new channel has a depth of eight feet and a width of 150 feet. See table of 
Navigation of the St. Lawrence, No. 5 of Appendix No. 30. 

This Report was drawn up by Mr. G. F. Baillairge, my deputy, and by Mr. S. 
Keefer, C.E. 

Harbour of Toronto. 

Appendix No. 14. — This Appendix containsa Report by Captain James B. Eads, 
C.E., and a memorandum by Mr. H. F. Perley, Chief Engineer of the Department, as 
to the means of maintaining and improving the Toronto Harbour, the entrances to 
which, and its interior, are tilling up from causes carefully studied and explained by 
the authors of these Reports. (Pages 515 — 534.) 

Overflow of Lake Manitoba. 

Appendix No. 15. — This is a Report by Mr. H. F. Perley, Chief Engineer of the 
Department, and by Mr. Thomas Gruerin, C.E., on the overflow of Lake Manitoba, the 
means of lowering the lake level, and of draining the country which surrounds it. 
(Pages 536—556.) 

Harbour of Victoria, British Columbia. 

Appendix No. 16. — The Harbour of Victoria, in British Columbia, requires some 
improvements ; Appendix contains Reports by the Hon. B. W. Pearse, and the 
Hon. J. W. Trutch, C.M.G. on the works already done and those still required 
to be done for the purpose. (Pages 557—566.) 

Eraser River, British Columbia. 

Appendix No. 17. — The letter on this explains its subject : — 

Report of a survey made of the Eraser River, B.C., by the Hon. B. W. Pearse, 
and Mr. G. B. Wright, and Report of the work done for the improvement of Cotton- 
wood Canon on the Upper Fraser River, by the same, with a statement of works 
remaining to be done; and also Report by Hon. J. W. Trutch and Mr. G-eorge Turner, 
on the dredging operations carried on in the Fraser River. (Pages 568 — 582.) 

Obstructions of Navigable Rivers by Saw-Mills and other Manufactories. 

The establishment of sawmiils and other manufactories upon the principal navi-l 
gable streams and rivers all over Canada, has caused certain inconveniences detailed 
in Appendix No. 18, the principal of which are the obstruction of these streams and j 
rivers, the corruption of the water, and the destruction of the fish, from the fact that 
persons working these various manufactories throw into the waters the refuse fromi 
their establishments, such as saw-dust, edgings, etc., etc. Complaints having been made] 

XXX 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A,, iSSS 

on this subject, the Government, on 6th November, 1871, appointed a Commission 
charged to make inquiries, and to report with respect to these complaints. The Ap- 
pendix contains the Eeport of that Commission, as well as the text of the Act thirty- 
six "Vic., chap. 65, having for its title " An Act for the better protection of navig- 
able streams and rivers." (Pages 583—640.) 

EXPENDITURE ON HARBOURS AND BREAKWATERS. 

The expenditure on these works up to 30th June, 1882,amounted to $7,8*75,035.48. 
Subdivided as follows, viz : — 

Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation 2,393,860 54 

Since Confederation 3,653,091 79 

$6,046,952 33 

Other than Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation $ 52,038 61 

Since Confederation 1,776,044 48 

1,828,083 15 

Total $7,875,035 48 

EXPENDITURE ON IMPROVEMENT OF RIVERS. 

The expenditure on these works up to 30th June, 1882, amounted to $714,363.36. 

Subdivided as follows, viz : — 

Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation $ 28,354 33 

Since Confederation 678,609 03 

$706,963 36 

Other than Government expenditure 
Prior to Confederation. (Not ascer- 
tained.) 

Since Confederation 7,400 00 

7,400 00 

Total $714,363 36 

The expenditure on harbours and breakwaters, and on the improvementjof 
rivers, includes the sums paid out of special appropriations togethor with those paid 
out of the appropriations for dredging. 

R 

xxxi 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No 10.) A. 1883 



For details respecting cost of construction and revenue, see Appendices Nos. 1, 
41, 42, 43, 43£, pages 118, 1066, 1072, 1079, 1241, 1278. 

DREDGING PLANT. 

The Dredging Plant owned by Government and operxted by my Djpirtment 
consists of the following : — 

In the Maritime Provinces. 

Elevator dredge " St. Lawrence." 

" " " Canada." 

Spoon dredge " New Dominion," and 10 scows. 

" " " Prince Edward," and 4 scows. 

" " " Cape Breton," and 7 scows. 

" " " Geo. McKenzie," and 3 scows. 

In Quebec. 

Spoon dredge " Queen of Canada," 2 scows, 2 stone lifters. 

" " " Nipissing." 
Tug " Dennis." 

Also, stone lifter " Baillairge," for working in the rapids of the St. Lawrence 
and a dredging machine at the Saguenay. 

In Ontario. 

Spoon dredge " Challenge, and 3 scows. 
Tug " Trudeau." 

In British Columbia. 

Dredger and tug " Georgia," and steamer " Sir James Douglas " (unde 
Department of Marine and Fisheries). 

The elevator dredges are self-propelling ; the spoon dredges have to be towe 
from place to place, and when working, require the services of tugs to remove thei 
scows to and from places of deposit. 

Owing to the large quantities of dredging required during some years, it becam; 
necessary at times to employ the services of dredges, etc, other than those the prop 
erty of the Government. 

It is proposed to build three tugs for service in the Maritime Provinces, and tvt 
additional scows for Quebec and Ontario ; to procure for Ontario a new spoon dredgi! 
two scows, and a steam tug ; to build and equip a self-propelling " snag boat " fc 
British Columbia, to place buoys in high water and remove snags in low water; an 
to procure a dredge, two scows and a tug for service in Manitoba, in improving tl 
.Red River, Lake Winnipeg, etc. 

R 

xxxii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 



The following is a statement of the expenditure on dredges and tugs owned by 

Government : — 

Maritime Provinces. 

$ cts. 
Dredge " St. Lawrence " (N\ S. and N. B.).. 116,389 48 

" " Canada" " 42,778 44 

" "New Dominion".. " 30,826 51 

" "Cape Breton" " 19,744 38 

" « Geo. McKenzie " (purchased 1879). 15,000 00 

Tugs (plant, etc.) 350 50 



Dredge " Prince Edward " (P. E. I.) 23,582 07 

Quehec. 

Dredge " Queen of Canada " , 15,000 00 

" " Nipissing " (purchased 1880) 13,501 57 

Tug " Dennis " (purchased 1880) 2,000 00 

Dredging vessels, generally 6,872 43 

Ontario, 

Dredge " Challenge " 31,211 32 

Tug " Trudeau " 6,847 05 

Dredging vessels, generally 21.600 00 



225,089 31 
23,582 07 



37,374 00 



59,658 37 



British Columbia. 

Dredger ) 93 447 96 

Steamer "Sir James Douglas " j y ^*' y 

Tug " Georgia " 6,250 00 

99,697 96 

Total $445,401 71 

(See Appendix No. 43, pages 1245—1272.) 

LIGHTHOUSES. 

Prior to Confederation, the construction and management of the lighthouses in 
the different Provinces were vested in the Department of Public Works. There were 
only two exceptions to this rule : — 

1. In the Province of Quebec, all the lighthouses situated below Montreal were 
under the management of the Trinity Houses of Montreal and Quebec. 

2. In New Brunswick the lighthouses were managed by the Board of Commis- 
sioners of Public Institutions. 

Since Confederation, the Department of Marine and Fisheries has had the man- 
agement of lighthouses, buoys, beacons, etc. 

By an Order in Council, dated 10th January, 1870, the Department of Marine 
and Fisheries is charged with the erection of lighthouses when the co3t of construc- 
tion does not exceed $10,000. 

R 

xxxiii 



48 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10 ) A. 188S 



Since Confederation, the Department of Public Works has constructed and 
repaired the lighthouses at twenty places in Nova Scotia ; three in New Bruns- 
wick ; three in the Province of Quebec ; eleven in the Province of Ontario, and one 
in British Columbia. (For details see Appendix 19, page3 641 — 644.) 

EXPENDITURE ON LIGHTHOUSES BEA.CON3 AND BUOYS. 

The expenditure on the construction of these works up to 30th June, 1882, 
amounts to $2,872,203.49 
Sub-divided as follows : 

Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation, in former Provinces of 

Upper and Lower Canada $1,685,930 84 

Since Confederation — 

By Department of Public Works 75,588 51 

By Department of Marine and Fisheries.. 1,110,624 14 



Total $2,872,203 49 

Expenditure in Maritime Provinces and British Columbia prior to Confederation 
not ascertained. 

For details of expenditure given above, etc., see Appendices Nos 1 and 43 
Pages 137, 1263, 1272. 

For expenditure by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, see Appendix N c 
43, page 1264. 

EOADS. 

The General Eeport of 1867 explains the system under which the highways o: 
communication were constructed and maintained in the Provinces of Upper and 
Lower Canada (now Ontario and Quebec), prior to the time of Confederation. 

It contains an enumeration and description of the roads constructed, improved 0] 
maintained, sold, transferred or abandoned by the Government, up to 1st July. 
1867. 

The land routes constructed or maintained by the General Government wen 
portions of the main highways — especially in the newly settled districts — the inter 
provincial and military roads. 

The former are now under the control of the Local Governments or municipal! 
ties, and in some cases under the charge of private companies ; the latter are stil 
maintained by the Federal Government. 

For details respecting the construction, description and cost of roads, see Com 
missioner's General Eeport of 1867, pages 111 to 118, and the Appendix of the sam 
Eeport, at pages 166 to 180, 437 to 444, 511 to 516, 579 to 582. 

R 

xxxiv 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 10.) A. 1883 



NORTH-WEST COMMUNICATION, 

THE DAWSON EOUTE. 

This hag already been referred to in connection with the Canadian Pacific Rail- 
way. 

The Dawson route, which is now superseded by a portion of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, extends from Prince Arthur's Landing, Thunder Bay, on the north 
shore of Lake Superior, to Fort Garry (Winnipeg), a distance of 452 miles. It 
includes the intermediate rivers and lakes and the Fort Frances Lock, which 
form a portion of the route. The distance by the railway is 435 miles. 

This highway was formerly used by immigrants and for military purposes. 

The route is fully described in Appendix No. 19 of this Report, pages 646 to 652. 

See also Appendix No. 30, Part I, pages 825 to 827, and Statements 17 and 18 in 
Put III of the same Appendix for further details respecting the Fort Frances 
Lock, etc. 

For Expenditure, etc., see Appendix No. 1. 

The steamboat voyage from Collingwood, Lake Huron, to Prince Arthur's Land' 
ing, is 532 miles in length. 

BRIDGES. 

Prior to Confederation the Provincial Governments, from time to time, granted 
supplies to the municipalities for the construction of bridges at important places upon 
the principal highways. 

Since that time, by an Order in Council, dated 11th February, 1871, bridges 
have been classed in three categories : — 

1. Bridges built and maintained by the Dominion Government solely. 

2. Bridges built and maintained partly by the Dominion Government and partly 
by local authorities. 

3. Bridg03 in which the Dominion Government has no interest and in respect of 
which it should not contribute. (Appendix No. 19, pages 653, 654 ) 

For enumeration, descriptions arid costof bridges constructed by Government prior 
to 1st July, 1867, see A}) endix No. 2), pages 130 to 192 ; and No. 70 7 pa^es 583 to 
5S4 in General Report of 1867. 

For list of roads and bridges sold, transferred or abandoned by Government 
prior to 1st July, 1867, see Appendix No. 26 of the same Report. 

For those which have been <nld, transferred or abandoned since 1st July, 1867, 
see Appendix No. 36 of this Report. 

xxxt 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



EXPENDITURE ON ROAD'S AND BUIDGKS. 

The expenditure on the construction of these works up to 30th June, 1882, 
amounts to $7,7 17,750.49. 

Sub-divided as follows, viz. : — 

Government expenditure — 

On roads and bridges in Quebec and Ontario 
which became the property of the Do- 
minion Government on 1st July, 1867 — 

Prior to Confederation $481,554 52 

Since Confederation 1,144,436 55 

-$1,625,991 07 

On roads and bridges transferred to Local Govern- 
ments of Quebec and Ontario — 

Prior to Confederation $6,066,560 07 

Since Confederation 25,199 35 

$6,091,759 42 



Total $7,717,750 49 

For details of expenditure, etc., see Appendices Nos. 1, 42, 43. 

SLIDES AND BOOMS. 

These constructions are for the purpose of facilitating the descent of lumber to 
the localities where the rafts are made up, and thence to the ports where it is 
shipped for exportation. 

"The Department possesses slides and booms in four great lumbering districts 
namely:— 

1st. Saguenay Eiver District. (Appendix No. 20, pages 655—656.) 

2nd. The St. Maurice River District. (Appendix No. 21, pages 657—660.) 

3rd. The Ottawa District. (Appendix No. 22, pages 661—676.) 

4th. The Trent District. (Appendix No. 23, pages 677—682.) 

The subjects of the four succeeding Appendices are fully explained by their 
titles, namely : — 

Appendix No. 24. —Tabular statement of the slides and booms of the Saguenay, 
Saint Maurice, Ottawa and Trent Districts, showing the dimensions, etc., of these 
constructions. (Pages 683 — 720.) 

xxxvi 



it Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



=3 



Appendix No. 25. — Proclamations respecting tolls and regulatins on the vario us 
Public Works. (Pages 721— 733.) 

Appendix No. 26. — Tabular statement showing the number ^^ pieces of timber 
which have passed through the Saguenay, 3 1. Maurice, Ottawa and Trent Slides, 
showing the gross revenues, deductions, net revenues and deficits of this service. 
(Pages 735—738.) 

Appendix 27,— Tabular statement of the Forest woods of North America, their 
Botanical, English and French names, the places where they are chiefly found, their 
dimensions, qualities, and the purposes for which they are principally used. (Pages 
739—753.) 

EXPENDITUEE ON SLIDES AND BOOMS. 

The expenditure on the construction of these works up to 30th June, 1882, 
amounts to $1,651,762,93, 

Sub-divided as follow?, viz : — 
Government expenditure 

Prior to Confederation $1,346,652 67 

Since Confederation 305,110 26 

Total $1,651,762 93 

For details respecting the cost of construction, repairs and management of slides 
and booms, and also respecting the revenue derived therefrom, see Appendices Nos. 
1, 24, 42, 43 at pages 123, 720, 1116, 1272 and Appendix to General Report 1867 at 
pages 156, 157, 560. 

TELEGRAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE. 

Appendix No. 28 (pages 755 — 761). — Contains an historical account of telegraph 
lines held by Government. By this it may be seen that the Government, at the pres- 
ent time, holds and works in the different Provinces, 152 miles of submarine cables 
and 2,566 miles of land telegraph in s. 

The Government has also established signal stations at twenty-four important 
points, and more will be established elsewhere as the requirements of navigation 
demand. 

Appendix No. 29 (pages 763— 789).— Contains two letters from the Hon. P. 
Fortin, M.P., respecting the telegraph and gignal service system in the Gulf of St. 
Lawrence ; and also the Norwegian telegraph system, showing its' irtiportaiice in 
Connection with the development of the sea fisheries of that country. 

TheBe two letters are followed by tabular statements on th© telegraph and signal 
service throughout Canada. 

ft xxxvii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No, 10.) A. 188S 



EXPENDITURE ON TELEGRAPH AND SIGNAL SERVICE. 

The expenditure on construction up to 30th June, 1882, amounts to $1,068,421.22. 
Subdivided as follows, viz: — 

Government expenditure — 

Prior to Confederation...... None. 

Since Confederation — 

By Department of Railways 

and Canals (included in 

cost of Pacific Railway) $670,620 84 
By Department of Publio 

Works 360,050 38 

$1,030,6*71 22 



Total, exclusive of subsidies $1,030,6*71 22 

Subsidies — 

Metis to Baie des Chaleurs.... $16,000 00 

Canso to Dartmouth 20,000 00 

Cape Ray and Port aux Bas- 
ques, Newfoundland, (not 
yet paid) 1,750 00 



3*7,*750 00 



Total, including subsidies $1,068,421 22 

INLAND NAVIGATION, OCEAN ROUTES, AND GOVERNMENT LAND 

ROUTES, OF CANADA. 

A brief outline of the Appendices which refer thereto will be sufficient to indi- 
cate their contents. 

Appendix No. 30.— This Appendix is divided into four parts, namely:— 

1. Tabulated profiles of the inland navigation of Canada. 

2. Ocean routes between Canada and foreign countries, 

3. Canadian land routes to the seaboard, Government railways, telegraph lines, 
and railway mail routes of Canada, etc. 

4* The principal overland mail routes and lines of railway and water communi 
cation in Manitoba, the North- West Territories and British Columbia. 

These tables show the lengths of the various stretches of navigation; their rise 
and fell ; the number and dimensions of the locks j the heights of th, o rivers, lakes, an< 
B ssxyiii 



iu 



Victoria, Sessional Papers (No, 10.) A. 1883 



?anals above tide- water at Three Elvers; the lowest draught of water on existing or 
proposed lines of inland navigation ; the dimensions of the largest vessels which can 
-)ass through the various canals and locks ; the comparative distances of the ports of 
Canada and of the United States, from the different foreign ports ; the various mail 
pontes, by rail or water, in Manitoba, the North-West Territories and British 
olumbia, in connection with the various works completed, in course pi construction 
w proposed up to the 1st July, 1882. 

Appendix No. 31. — This Appendix gives the dates of the opening and closing 
)f navigation at the principal ports on the sea-board, in the Gulf, Eiver and Lakes 
)f the St. Lawrence ; on the canals of the various routes of inland navigation, and on 
;he Erie and Champlain Canals, &c. 

It shows that the opening of navigation, on the Canadian Canals, generally takss 
Dlace about the 1st of May, and the closing about the 1st of December in each year. 
It shows, also, the ports which are generally open during the whole winter season. 
For details prior to 1867, see the General Eeport, pages 374 to 400. 

Appendix No. 31 J.— Statement indicating the time of high water at full and 
hange, and the vise of neap and spring tides, at various places in Canada. 

ARRIVALS, AND TONNAGE, &c, OF VESSELS AT THE PRINCIPAL SEA- 
PORTS OF CANADA. 

Appendix No. 32. — This Appendix gives a comparative statement of the number 
f vessels, their aggregate tonnage and their crews, which have arrived from sea at 
he ports of Halifax, Nova Scotia ; St. John, New Brunswick ; Charlottetown, Prince 
Edward Island ; Quebec and Montreal, Province of Quebec; and Victoria, British 
Columbia, from 1867 to 1882, Compiled from " Trade and Navigation Eeturns." 

D VESSELS BUILT AT THE PEINCIPAL SHIP-BUILDING POETS OF 

CANADA. 

njj Appendix No. 33. — This Appendix gives the number and tonnage of steam and 
ailing vessels built at the principal ship-building ports in the Provinces of Nova 
Icotia, New Brunswick, Quebec and Ontario, from 1867 to 1882. This Appendix 
fas compiled from " Trade and Navigation Eeturns." 

For details prior to 1867, see the General Eeport, pages 424, 425. 



3SSELS WRECKED ON THE SEA-COAST, AND ON THE ST. LAWRENCE. 

Appendix No. 34. — This shows the number of sea-going and coasting vessels 
rrecked on the sea-coast, in the Gulf, Eiver and Lakos of the St. Lawrence, in 
•anada, from 1867 to 1881. This Appendix was compiled from the Annual Eeports 
f the Department of Marino and Fisheries. 

For vessels wrecked prior to 186/, see the General Eoport, pages 426 to 428. 

xxxix 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

ARBITRATIONS AND AWARDS. 

The Public Works Act, 31 Vic, chap. 12, provided for the appointment of a Board 
of Official Arbitrators, to consist of not more than four members ; their duties to be 
to enquire into such claims, arising from contracts, expropriations of lands, etc., as 
might be referred to them, by the Minister of Public Works. 

The powers of the Board were increased by, and matters affecting arbitrations 
were made the subjects of subsequent Acts, viz.: — 33 Vic, chap. 23; 41 Vic. 
chap. 8, and 42 Vic, chap. 8. 

The Act 33 Vic, chap. 12, provided for the reference to the Arbitrators of claims 
made against any of the Departments of the Government. 

At the time of the division of the Department of Public Works, under Act 47 
Vic, chap. 7, the Board of Arbitrators was placed under the control of both the 
Department of Public Works and the Department of Railways and Canals. 

For Statement of the claims submitted to the Dominion Arbitrators, with the 
result of the arbitration in each case, see Appendix No. 35. 

PROPERTIES SOLD, TRANSFERRED, OR ABANDONED. 

Appendix No 36. — This Appendix shows: — 

1. Properties purchased or sold by the Department of Public Works. 

2. Properties transferred or abandoned by the Department. 

3. Properties transferred by the Dominion Government to the Local Govern 
ments, or by the Local Governments to the Dominion Government. 

ORDNANCE AND NAVAL PROPERTY. 

Appendix No. 36J. — This Appendix consists of: — ' 

1. Order in Council of 20th October, 18*79, approving and confirming the classi 
fication of War Department properties in New Brunswick, as per Schedule to Ac 
42 Vic, chap. 33, of 15th May, 1879. 

2. Order in Council of 19th May, 1879, to the same effect as regards War Depart 
ment properties in Ontario and Quebec, as per Schedule to the Act, Consolidatec 
Statutes of Canada, 22 Vic, chap. 36. 

3. Order in Council of the 16th November, 1869, classifying certain Ordnanc* 
property in Ontario and Quebec, belonging to the Dominion Government, unde 
Section 108 of the " British North America Act of 1867." 

. 4. Statement of War Department lands, and buildings and naval property 

Toronto, Kingston, Montreal, Sorel, Quebec, Point Levis, surrendered to the Dons 

inion Government in 1870-71 and 1871-72. 

xl 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 

The general report of 1867 contains full particulars respecting the transfer of 
the Carillon, Chute a Blondeau, Grenville and Eideau Canals, together with other 
properties, by the Imperial to the Canadian Government prior to 1st July of that 
iyear. See Commissioner's report at page 51, and Appendices 58 and 60 of his Report 
at pages 444 to 450, in 186*7. 

ACTS RELATING TO PUBLIC WORKS. 

Appendix No. 37. — Acts relating to Public Works of Canada. Pages 1028 — 1031. 
See Appendix No, 59 of General Report, 1867, for list of Acts, 1838 to 1st July, 
1867. Page 448. 

}LD PLANS, DEEDS, &C, RELATING TO GOVERNMENT PROPERTY. 

Appendix No. 38. — List of plans, deed>>, etc., relating to Government property, 
>tc, at Quebec and elsewhere, showing where these plans, deeds, etc., can be pro- 
ured, and those which have been copied for the use of the Department of Public 
Works. Pages 1034—1042. 

CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Appendix No. 39. — List of contracts awarded by the Department of Public 
Works from 30th June, 1867, to the 30th November, 1882. Pages 1044—1056. 

PLANS AND MODELS SENT TO PARIS EXHIBITION. 

Appendix No. 40. — Memorandum respecting Canadian Canals, and also the plans 
nd models, etc., sent by the Department of Public Works of Canada to the Paris 
Exhibition in 1878. Pages 1058—1064. 

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE— PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND— ON 

PUBLIC WORKS. 

Appendix No. 41. — Expenditure by Provincial Government of Prince Edward 
land on Harbour Works, before and since the entrance of that Province into Confed- 
ation, 1st July, 1873. Also revenue accrued from such Works since 1st July, 1873. 
ages 1066—1074. 






REVENUE FROM PUBLIC WORKS, CANADA. 



Appendix No. 42. — Tabular statement showing the revenue from the Public 

forks of Canada since date of Confederation, 1st July, 1867, by Mr. O. Dionne, 

ccountant in the Department. Pages 1076—1135. For revenue in Upper and 

ower Canada prior to Confederation, see Appendix, pages 454 to 480 of Genera 

eport, 1867. 

10 a — d r 

xli 



i& Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF TRAFFIC ON RAILWAYS AND CANALS. I 

Appendix No. 42J. — Comparative statement of passengers and freight traffic on 
railway lines which compete with canals in Canada and in the State of New York, 
etc., U.S. Pages 1137— 1141. 

COST OF PUBLIC WORKS, CANADA. 

Appendix No. 43. — Tabular statement showing the cost of construction of Public 1 
Works in Canada, as far as it is possible to state those expenses, previous to and since I 
Confederation, or from commencement of such works to 1st July, 1882. Page 1144. I 

For cost of Public Works in Upper and Lower Canada before Confederation, 1st 1 
July, 186?, see Appendix No. 70 of General Report, 1867, pages 481 to 613. 

The cost of the Public Works in the other Provinces, prior to Confederation, has 1 
not been fully ascertained. 

EXPENDITURE ON THE CONSTRUCTION OP THE PUBLIC WOR&S OF 1 

CANADA. 

The expenditure on the construction and improvement of Public Works in each [ I 
Province of the Dominion is as follows : — 
Prior to Confederation — 

Nova Scotia (Railways and Canals 

only) $6,280,764 47 

Prince Edward Island (Railways 

and Harbours only) 3,339,116 13 

New Brunswick (Railways only) . . 4,642,484 39 

Quebec (formerly Lower Canada) . 18,842,437 22 

Ontario (formerly Upper Canada).34,978,662 31 

British Columbia (Dredges only).. 92,000 00 

$68,175,464 52 

Since Confederation — 

Nova Scotia 11,924,099 44 

Prince Edward Island.: 1,057,734 43 

New Brunswick 14,743,440 18 

Quebec 24,149,766 22 

Ontario 32,209,056 86 

Manitoba 6,352,985 06 

North-West Territories 2,977,337 39 

British Columbia 5,093,396 38 

Miscellaneous 132,491 24 

$98,640,307 20 

Total expenditure on Dominion Government 

Works $166,815,771 72 

R 

xlii 



; 46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10 ) A. 1S83 

Apart from the above, a sum of $11, 119, 659. 88 was expended, prior to Confedera- 
tion, by the Provincial Governments of Lower and Upper Canada, on construction of 
works which were either transferred to Local Governments of Quebec and Ontario, 
or abandoned to municipal authorities. See Appendix 43, page 1268. 

The expenditure prior to Confederation, in the Maritime Provinces, as far as 
ascertained, will be found in the supplementary statement published at end of Ap- 
pendix No. 43, excepting expenditure on Railways, St. Peter's Canal, and Harbours 
Prince Edward Island, which is included above. 

See Appendix No. 43, pages 1274, 12 75 and App. N... 43J, pages 1278-1283. 

EXPENDITURE ON HARBOURS, ROADS AND BRIDGES, NOYA SCOTIA. 

Appendix No. 43J-. — Expenditure by the Provincial Government of Nova Scotia 
on Harbours, Roads and Bridges, during the fifteen years previous to Confederation, 
1st July, 1867. Pages 1278—1283. 

ALTITUDES OF VARIOUS PLACES IN QUEBEC. 

Appendix No. 44. — Showing the altitudes of different places in Quebec above 
the low water level of the St. Lawrence. Page 1286. 

ENGLISH AND FRENCH MEASURES. 

Appendix No. 45. — Tables of English and French measures, etc., used in 
Canada, etc. Pages 1288—1297. 

AREA AND POPULATION OF THE GLOBE. 
Appendix No. 45J. — Area and Population of the Globe, etc. Pages 1300 — 1302. 

SYNOPSIS OF GENERAL REPORT, 1867. 

Appendix No. 46.— Synopsis of the report on Public Works of the united Pro- 
vinces'of Quebec andJOntario, from their commencement to the date of Confederation, 
1st July, 1867. Pages 1304— 1308. 

COMMISSIONERS AND MINISTERS, ETC., OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

Appendix No. 47. — List showing the names of the Members, Commissioners and 
Assistant-Commissioners of the Board of Works, the Ministers and Deputy Ministers, 
Secretaries, Chief Engineers, Chief Architects, etc., of the Department, from the 
commencement, 10th February, 1841, to 1st July, 1882. Pages 1310—1311. 

GENERAL REMARK. 

Most of the Appendices to this Report, and of those referred to in the General 
Report of 1867, have been prepared under the direction and supervision of Mr. G. F. 
Baillairge, my Deputy, who has been attached to this Department for a period of 
nearly forty years. 

R 

xliii 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (^.10.) 



A. 188J 



PEKSPECTIVE VIEWS AND PLANS. 

The following views and plans, are appended to this Eeport : — 
1. — Perspective view of Eideau Hall, residence of the 

Governor General, Ottawa Between pages 208 and 209 

2. — Perspective view of Parliament Building, Ottawa... do 203 and 209 

3.— Do do do Library do .... do 208 and 209 

4. — Dj do East Departmental Building, 

Ottawa do 208 and 209 

5. — Perspective view of West Departmental Building, 

* Ottawa do 208 and 209 

6.— Perspective view of Post Office, Custom House and 

Inland Revenue Office, Ottawa Between pages 208 and 209 

*7. — Plan of Quebec Harbour Improvements at mouth of 

Kiver St. Charles do 334 and 335 

8. — Plan of the Graving Dock at Levis do 334 and 335 

9.— Plan of Toronto Harbour. .,'«'. do 534 and 535 

10.— Plan of the Graving Dock at Esquimalt, B. C do 566 and 567 

11. — Perspective view of Union Suspension Bridge, 

Ottawa] do 654 and 655 

MAPS. 

Accompanying this Report, to be furnished under a separate cover, 

1, — Map of the World's Submarine Cables and principal Telegraph Lines. 

2. — Map showing Dominion Government Telegraph Lines along the Eiver and Gulf 

of St. Lawrence below Quebec, and along the sea coast of the Maritime 

Provinces 
3. — Map showing Dominion Government Telegraph Lines in part of the Province of 

Quebec and of the Province of Ontario. 
4. — Map showing the Dominion Government Telegraph Lines in the Province of 1 

Manitoba and the North- West Territories. 
5. — Map showing the Dominion Government Telegraph Lines and Cables in the 

Province of British Columbia. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

HECTOE L. LANGEYIN, 

Minister of Public Works, 
Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa, May, 1883. 



R 

xliv 



46 Victoria Sessional Papers (No, 10.) A. 188$ 



DOMINION OF CANADA. 



APPENDICES 

a 

;;; 

, TO THE 

GENERAL REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS, 

FROM 

30th JUNE, 1867, TO 1st JULY, 1882; 



10 a— e 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1888 



TABLE OF APPENDICES. 




6 



26763 



35695 



32310 



22969 



22295 



30776 



60123 



31841 



Statements of Expenditure on Public Works in each Province of 
the Dominion of Canada, from 30th June, 1867, to 1st July, 
1882, by Octave Dionne, Aocountant ., Mf 



Report on Public Buildings throughout the Dominion, from 30th 
June, 1867, to 1st July, 1882, by Thomas Fuller, Chief Archi- 
tect • 



Report on the Harbours, Rivers, etc., throughout the Dominion, 
from 30th June, 1867, to 1st July, 1882, by H. F. Perley, Chief 
Engineer..,. .. 



Report on Harbours in the Maritime Provinces, by G. F. Baillairgfi, 
formerly Assistant Chief Engineer, now Deputy of the Minister 
of Public Works 



Report on the Projected Harbour of Refuge between Rimouski 
and Father Point, by G. F. Baillairge, formerly Assistant 
Chief Engineer, now Deputy of the Minister of Public Works. 

Report on the Improvements in Quebec Harbour since Confeder- 
ation, 1st July, 1867, — on the Graving Dock, at Levis, and on 
the operations of the Lifting Barge, by the Quebec Harbour 
Commissioners 



Report respecting the Formation, Motion, Breaking-up, etc., of 
the Ice, and the Prevailing Currents and Winds in the 
Harbour of Quebec, as affecting the Navigation, in connection 
with the Location of the Projected Graving Dock, by R 
Steckel, Assistant Engineer, from Appendix of G. F. Bail- 
lairge's Report 



10 



22129 
32719 



30740 



Memorandum respecting the Lake St. John and Saguenay Regions, 
the Public Works Executed, in Progress or Projected at the 
various localities therein, together with Notes on the Route 
to Hudson's Bay and the Navigation thereon, etc., etc 



ByG. 



Part I. Lake St. John and Tributaries, etc. 

Part II. River Saguenay and Tributaries, etc. 

Part IH. Lake St. John, River Saguenay and Hudson's 

Bay. Notes, etc., A to S , .,.., 

F. Baillairge, Deputy Minister of Public Wcrks, 



Report of J. B. Normand, one of the Commissioners appointed to 
inquire into the cause of the Floods which occur periodically 
in the River St. Lawrence between Montreal and Quebec 



Report on the Improvements made in the Harbour of Montreal 
and also on the Deepening of the Channel between Quebec 
and Montreal, by the Montreal Harbour Commissioners 



■WT 



210 



292 



320 



330 



33# 



344 
346 

368 

390 



448 



452 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No,10.) 



A. 1883 



SZZ=Z 



TABLE OF APPENDICES— Continued. 

W .JW i ■■ « ll.JUHJ. 1 .1 I .. . l I ■UU —i — BMW — — — — WW* 



^ 



.d 



ii 



11 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



Depart- 
mental 
Number 

of 
Reference, 



19 
20 

21 



9763 



9342 



32797 
19814 



22974 



10247 
21253 



fi732 

20894 
21112 
21651 

47668 

50463 

3972 

10720 



28931 



SUBJECT, 



Memorandum and Memorial from Montreal Harbour Commis- 
sioners with reference to the Debt incurred by the Commis 
sioners in Deepening the Channel between Montreal and 
Quebec 



Report from the Montreal Board of Trade "and Montreal Corn 
Exchange Association on Harbour Dues and Transit Charges 
at Montreal and Atlantic Ports 



Reports and Estimates respecting the Cost of Improving the 
Navigation of the River St. Lawrence, below Lake St. Francis 
by G. F. BaillairgS, Deputy Minister of Public Works, and 
Samuel Keefer, formerly Chief Engineer and Deputy Commis- 
sioner of Public Works 



Report on Toronto Harbour, with recommendations respecting 
the improvements which should be made, by Captain James 
B. Eads, C.E. ;— also Memorandum by H. F. Perley, Chief 
Engineer of Public Works, giving a description of the Harbour, 
and of the different surveys made of it, etc , 

Report on the Overflow of Lake Manitoba, with suggestions res- 
pecting the lowering of the Lake level and drainage of the 
adjacent country, by H. F. Perley, Chief Engineer of Public 
Works, and Thomas Guerin, C.E 



Report on the Dredging of the Harbour of Victoria, B.C., with a 
statement of the work still to be done, by Hon. B. W. Pearse 
and Hon. J. W. Trutch, C.M.G.. 



Report on a Survey made of the Fraser River, B.C., by Hon. B. W. 
Pearse and Gr. B. Wright, also report on work done for the 
Improvement of Cottonwood Canon, Upper Fraser River, by 
by Hon. B. W. Pearse and G. B. Wright, with a statement of 
work remaining to be done ; and also report by Hon. J. W. 
Trutch and George Turner, on the dredging operations 



carried on in the Fraser River. 



31826$ 

S0975 
35696 

29862 
30458 



Report of the Commission appointed by Order in Council dated 
6th November, 1871, to inquire into and report on the alleged 
Obstruction to Navigable Streams and Rivers in the Provinces 
of Quebec and Ontario, by deals, edgings, saw dust and other 
refuse from saw-mills ; together with the Act 36 Vict., Chap 
65, entitled "An Act for the better protection of Navigable 
Streams and Rivers" 



Report on Lighthouses, Roads and Bridges, etc., by J. A. Phillips. 

Report on the Slides and Booms in the Saguenay River District, 
by Joseph Rosa, Superintendent Engineer 



Report on the Slides and Booms in the St. Maurice District, by 
Charles Lajoie, Superintendent. ,...» 



Slviii 



16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.10.) 



A. 1883 



TABLE OF APPENDICES— Continued* 



§3 



Depart- 
mental 
Number 
of 
Reference. 



SUBJECT. 



Page, 



23 
24 

25 



27 



29 



30 



29535 
35697 

30957 
31381 

35696 
30458 
35697 
30957 



35714 



36034 



35717 



30279 



19591 



33859 



Report on the Ottawa District Works, by G. P. Brophy, Super- 
intendent 



Report on the Slides and Booms in the River Trent District, by 
Thomas D. Belcher, Superintendent 



Tabular Statement of the Slides, Dams, Piers and Booms of 
Canada, designed for the passage of timber to seaports, 
showing the situatisn, dimensions, cost, etc, of these works, 
constructed, in progress of construction or managed by the 
Department of Public Works. 



Proclamations respecting Tolls and Regulations on Public 
Works...,.....: 



Tabular Statement showing the number of Logs or pieces of 
Timber which have passed through the Saguenay, St. Maurice, 
Ottawa and Trent Slides ; — with the gross revenues, deduc- 
tions, net revenues and deficits 



Tabular Statement of the Forest Woods of North America, 
showing their Botanical, English and French names, the places 
where they are chiefly grown, their dimensions, qualities, and 
the purposes for which they are generally used, compiled by 
C.Tache 



Report on the Telegraph and Signal Service of the Dominion of 
Canada, giving an historical account of its establishment, 
cost of maintenance, etc., by F. N. Gisborne, Superintendent. 

Letters from Hon. P. Fortin, M.P., on the Telegraph and Signal 
Service System, in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence, and also on 
the Norwegian Telegraph System, showing its importance ini 
connection with the development of the sea-fisheries of 
Norway ' 

i 
Tabulated Profiles and Memoranda of the Inland Navigation of 
Canada, Ocean Routes thence to Foreign Countries, Canadian 
Land Routes to the seaboard, Government Railways, Tele- 
graph Lines, Railway Mail Routes of Canada, also principal 
Overland Mail Routes and Lines of Railway and Water 
Communication in Manitoba, the North- West Territories and| 
British Columbia, by G. F. Baillairge, Deputy Minister of 

Public Works 

Part I. — Tables of Distances, etc. Inland Navigation of Canada, 
showing existing and proposed routes with their principal 
connections, also, length and dimensions of Canals and 
locks and draught of water throughout, together with the 

rise and fall on each route, etc 

Part II. — Tables of Distances, etc. Ocean Routes between the 
principal ports of Canada and United States in North 

America, and those of Foreign Countries , 

Part III. — Tables of Distances, etc. Inter-Provincial Roads 
and Land Routes to the Seaboard, Government Railways 
and Government Telegraph Lines, together with Table of 
xMx 



662 
678 

684 
722 

736 

740 
756 

764 



792 

794 

850 



(6 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A, 1883 



TABLE OF APPENDICES— Continued. 



© x 

la 



30 



Depart- 
mental 
Number 

of 
Keference, 



33859 



31 36033 



SUBJECT. 



Part III Continued. 

the British Possessions throughout the World, Population 
and Extent of the Globe, and Table of the largest Empires, 
etc., etc 



Part IV.— Railway Mail Service in Canada, Mail Routes, etc., in 
Manitoba, the North-West Territories and British Columbia, 
according to Postmaster General Report, for the year ending 
30th June, 1882 



31* 
32 

33 
34 

35 

36 



Tabular Statement showing the Dates of the Opening and Closing 
of Navigation at the Principal Ports of Canada, on the Sea- 
board and on the Gulf, River and Lakes of the St. Lawrence ; 
also on the Canals of the River St.* Lawrence, River Richelieu 
and Lake Champlain Routes, River Ottawa Route, River Trent 
Route, Dawson Route, and on the Hudson River and Erie 
Canal 



35716 
36018 

36019 
36020 

36021 
36022 



Statement showing Time of High Water at Full and Change, and 
Rise of Neap and Spring Tides at various places in Canada.... 

Comparative Statement of the Number of Vessels, their Aggre- 
gate Tonnage and the Number of Men employed, which have 
arrived from Sea at the Ports of Halifax, N.S., St. John, N.B., 
Charlottetown, P.E.L, Quebec and Montreal, P.Q., and 
Victoria, B.C., from 1867 to 1882 : 



Statement showing the Number and Tonnage of Vessels Cons-, 
tructed at the principal ship building ports in Canada from! 
1868 to 1882 inclusive , 



Number of Sea-Going and Coasting Vessels Wrecked on the Sea 
coast, in the Gulf, River and Lakes of the St. Lawrence, in 
the Dominion of Canada, from 1868 to 1881, inclusive. Com- 
piled from reports of the Department of Marine and Fisheries 
by A. Gobeil 



Statement of the Awards made by the Dominion Arbitrators, from 
their Appointment to 30th June, 1882. By Charles Thibault, 
Secretary to Official Arbitrators.... 



37 



Statement showing - 

1st. Properties purchased or sold by the Department. 

2nd. Properties transferred or abandoned by the Department. 

3rd. Properties transferred by the Dominion Government to 

Local Governments, or by Local Governments to Dominion 

Government 
4th. Properties leased by the Department , 



36023 
36024 



Ordnance Property transferred by Imperial to Canadian Govern- 
ment, since 30th June, 1867 

Public Acts of the Parliament of Canada having reference to the 



Page. 



860 



888 



951 



981 



99* 



Public Works Department, etc., etc., from 1867 to 1882 | 1( 

1 



It tfictork. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



TABLE OF APPENDICES— Continue.*. 




38 



38 



39 

40 
41 

42 



Depart- 
mental 
Number 

of 
Keference. 



SUBJECT. 



8862 



36025 

35694 
32454 

36026 



42* 



43 



I 



43* 

44 

45 
45$ 



35872 



36027 



36833 

36028 

36029 
36782 



List of Plans, Proces-Verbaux and other documents connected 
with Government and other Property in Quebec and else- 
where, selected by G. F. Baillairge, Deputy Minister of Public 
Works, in the Crown Lands Department, Laval University, 
Royal Engineers' Office and Cadastre Office, Quebec, during 
the months of November and December, 1869 

Alphabetical Index of Contracts let by the Department of Public 
Works, from 1st July, 1867, to 1st December, 1882, exclusive 
of Railways and Canals. Compiled by Antoine Gobeil 

Memorandum on Canadian Canals, Plans and Models sent to 
the Paris Exhibition in 1878. By A. Gobeil, , 

Expenditure by Provincial Government of Prince Edward Island 
on Harbour Works, etc., prior to Confederation, 1st July, 
1873 j also Revenue collected by Provincial Government 
from Harbour Works and Bridges, from 1st April, 1873, to 
31st December, 1882 

Statement showing : — 

1st. Revenue derived from Public Works mentioned. 

2nd, Deductions from Revenue for working expenses, repairs, 

management, etc. 
3rd. The Number and Tonnage of Vessels which passed 

through the Canals of the Dominion j also the Number 

of Passengers conveyed through the same. 

Part I — From 1st July, 1867, to 30th June, 1877 

Part II For the fifteen years ended 30th June, 1882 

Compiled by Octave Dionne, Accountant. 

Comparative Statement of the Traffic on the Railways and Canals 
in the Dominion of Canada, with the Traffic on tne Railways 
and Canals of the State of New York, etc., from 1868 to 1882, etc. 
Compiled by W. J. Patterson, Secretary of the Board of Trade 
of Montreal 



Page. 



Statement showing : — 

1st. The Expenditure prior to Confederation by the Provin- 
cial Government on the Construction and Improvement 
of Public Works which became the property of the 
Dominion on the 1st July, 1867. 

The Expenditure by the Dominion Government from 
1st July, 1867, to 30th June, 1882. 

The Expenditure from other than Government Funds. 
Compiled by Octave Dionne, Accountant 



2nd. 



3rd. 



Statement showing expenditure by Provincial Government on Har- 
bours, Roads and Bridges, Nova Scotia, 1852 to 1st July, 1867.) 

Altitudes of different points in Quebec above the St. Lawrence at] 
low tide ,... 



Tables of English and French Measures, etc., used in Canada, etc. 

Area and Population of the Globe, compiled as far as possible from 

the last Official Census of each Country, by J. A. Phillips, 

li 



1034 

1044 
1058 

1066 



1076 
1112 



1137 



1144 

1277 

1286 
1288 

1300 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.10.) 



A. 181 



TABLE OF APPENDICES— Continued. 






Depart- 
mental 
Number 

of 
Reference. 



SUBJECT. 



46 



47 



36030 Synopsis of the General Report on Public Works of the United 
Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada, now the Provinces of 
Quebec and Ontario, from their commencement to the time 
of Confederation 1st July, 1867, by F. H. Ennis, Secretary of 
the Department of Public Works | 

36031 List of Members, Commissioners and Assistant Commissioners of 
the Board of Works, and of the Ministers, Deputy Ministers,! 
Secretaries, Chief Engineers and Chief Architects, of the] 
Department of Public Works, from 1841 to 1882 

Index of Appendices, at end of Appendix No. 47 

37349 [Addenda respecting Petition for the widening of the Grande 

Decharge of Lake St. John, P.Q., at end of Index 

Order in Council, dated 8th May, 1882, dividing portion of 

North- West Territories into four Provisional Districts 

Esquimalt Graving Dock, B.C., Dimensions, depth of water, etc. 
Remark respecting soundings shown on Plan of River St. Charles 

Estuary 

Details of Expenditure, Parliament and Departmental Buildings, 

Ottawa k 



VIEWS AND PLANS. 

1. — Perspective view of Rideau Hall, residence of the Governor 

General, Ottawa. Between pages 

2, — Perspective view of Parliament Building, Ottawa. Between 

pages ! „ 

3. — Perspective view of Parliament Library, Ottawa. Between 

pages 

4. — Perspective view of East Departmental Building, Ottawa, 

Between pages , 

i 5. — Perspective view of West Departmental Building, Ottawa. 

Between pages , 

6. — Perspective view of Post Office, Custom House and Inland 

Revenue Office, Ottawa. Between pages 

7. — Plan of Quebec Harbour Improvements at mouth of River 

St. Charles. Between pages 

8 Plan of the Graving Dock at Levis. Between pages. 

9. — Plan of Toronto Harbour. Between pages 

10. — Plan of the Graving Dock at Esquimalt, B.C. Between pages. 
11.— Perspective view of Union Suspension Bridge, Ottawa. 

Between pages , 



MAPS 

Accompanying report, but not bound with it. Furnished in 
separate cover. 

1. — Map of the World's Submarine Cables and Principal Tele- 
graph Lines. 

2 — Map showing Dominion Government Telegraph Lines along 
the River and Gulf St. Lawrence, below Quebec, and along 
the sea coast of the Maritime Provinces. 

3. — Map showing Dominion Government Telegraph Lines in 
part of the Province of Quebec and the Province of Ontario* 

4. — Map showing Dominion Government Telegraph Lines in 
the Province of Manitoba and the North West Territories. 

5. — Map showing the Dominion Government Telegraph Lines 
and Cables in the Province of British Columbia. 



lii 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 




APPENDIX No. I 



STATEMENTS OF EXPENDITURE 



ON 






PUBLIC WORKS IN EACH PROVINCE 

OF THE 

DOMINION OF OA.1STA.33A., 

FKOM 1st JULY, 1867, TO 30th JUNE, 1882. 



10 a—1 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



1 



Yeakly Expenditure on EAILWAYS 

CONSTEUC 





Name 

of 
"Work. 


Year ended 


CO 

.a 

a 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 

2 
3 


Intercol. Ry 

Nova Scotia Ry. 

European and 
North Ameri- 
can Ry., N.B... 

P. E. Island Ry. 

Pacific Ry 


I. 
116 

117 
117 


% cts. 
50,081 64 

413,550 16 
19,721 85 


I. 
153 

153 
153 


$ cts. 
169,782 12 

88,928 47 
23,904 59 


I. 

177 
177 

178 

177 
178 


$ cts. 
1,567,586 40 

131,468 66 
30,326 43 


I. 
192 

205 


$ cts. 
2,866,376 44 

50,405 69 


II. 
246 

246 

246 


$ Ct8. 
5,039,063 58 

33,502 65 
58,575 23 


A 








R 














198 


30,148 32 


246 
371 


489,423 16 




Totals.... 
















.... 


483,353 65 


.... 


282,615 18 


.... 


1,729,381 49 


.... 


2,946.930 45 




5,620,509 67 



WORKING 



Nova Scotia Ry. 

European and 
North Ameri- 
can Ry., N.B... 

Intercol. Ry 

P. E. Island Ry. 



Totals... 



210 
211 



228,276 11 
131,684 97 



359,961 08 



261 398 76 
126,149 71 



387,548 47 



299 

299 



305,524 76 
139,683 99 



445,208 75 



272,409 60 



442,993 31 



338 
338 



339,324 14 
255,752 08 



595,076 22 



(a) Including $208,502.72 charged to " Consolidated Fund." 
(6) do 83,363.18 do do 

N.B. —The figures in the columns preceding amounts indicate the Part and folio in Public 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years. 
TION. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


•V 

a 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


n. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 




137 
137 
156 


4,827,183 71 
172,968 18 


168 
169 


3,417,661 87 
70,711 73 


201 
201 


2,645,460 92 
515,691 59 


206 
206 


998,991 46 
109,280 13 


197 
197 


1,004,057 16 
214,954 63 


22,586,245 30 

(a) 
1,801,461 89 


1 
2 


137 
156 


201,298 48 


169 


126,525 21 


201 


264,947 04 


206 


50 00 


197 


99,340 40 


(6) 

824,689 28 


3 










?,ni 


46,086 63 


?07 


42,546 10 
3,346,567 06 


197 


200,000 00 
1,691,149 97 


288,632 73 
7,975,578 50 


4 


137 


561,818 44 


169 


310,224 88 


219 


1,546,241 67 


245 
250 


232 
239 


5 




5,763,268 81 




3,925,123 69 


.... 


5,018,427 85 


.... 


4,497,434 75 




3,209,502 16 


33,476,607 70 





EXPENSES. 



223 



1,011,892 60 



1,011,892 60 



207 
207 



1,847,175 24 
750 00 



1,847,925 24 



1,532,589 62 
49,344 62 



1,581,934 24 



287 
287 



1,277,197 79 
219,930 43 



1,497,128 22 



1,661,673 55 
228,595 25 



1,890,268 80 



1,406,933 37 



823,854 46 

7,330,528 80 

498,620 30 



10,059,936 93 



* For following years see Intercolonial|Railway. 



Accounts where expenditure may be found. 



10a— 1J 



40 Victoria 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Yearly Expenditure on CANALS 

CONSTEUC 

NOVA 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


a 
£3 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


St. Peter's 


I. 
116 


$ cts. 
21,519 72 


I. 
153 


$ cts. 
70,719 80 


I. 

177 


$ cts. 
46,193 57 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


2 


do Enlargement & 
deepening 






Totals 
























21,519 72 




70,719 80 




46,193 57 



















NEW 



Baie Verte Canal 
Surrey 



I. 
203, 



17,929 34 



II. 
260 



6,399 41 



QUE- 



1 


Machine. ;- 

do Enlargemtit . . 


III. 
46 


1,852 70 


I. 
153 


2,000 00 


I. 




I. 
193 


12,231 40 


II. 

247 


36,708 15- J 









3 


Beauharnois— 
do Land damages. 

Ste. Anne's Lock... 


I. 

122 
III. 

46 


63,193 75 


158 


55 00 


180 


27 50 






261 

249 

247 

247 


27 50 1 
1.939 46 : j 

15,701 85 ;| 
149,555 43 


4 






5 


Carillon and Gren- 
ville 


I. 

115 

III. 

42 


19,817 22 






176 

180 


4,167 96 


c 




n 


do Enlargement.. 






194 


23,119 37 


7 


Carillon andChute a 
Blondeau Dam, 














3 


Culbute Rapids 






















c» 


Chambly Canal 














193 


2,839 85 


249 


1,906 40 1 


10 


St.Lawrence Canals 
(Proportion of ex- 
















Totals 
























84,863 67 




2,055 00 




4,195 46 




38,190 62 




205,838 79 



16 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18S3 



for the undermentioned years. 



TION. 

SCOTIA. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


£ 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
138,433 09 

74,476 15 


i 










195 


20 97 


202 


11,125 00 


189 


63,330 18 


•■> 




















20 97 




11,125 00 




63,330 18 


212,909 24 





BRUNSWICK 



II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 








136 
























150 


14,943 83 


167 


4,018 90 


195 


443 00 


202 


110 75 


189 


22 30 


43,867 53 


1 



BEC. 



II. 

125 

133 
144 


36,188 95 
6,793 54 


II. 

166 
166 


101,706 49 
56,911 86 


II. 

193 
193 


34,623 25 
162,797 27 


II. 

200 
200 


3,459 64 
324,309 75 


II. 




228,770 58 
1,990,188 15 


] 


187 


1,439,375 73 


2 


151 

161 


5,122 50 
540 11 


176 


26 00 


249 


36 00 










68,488 25 
102,799 48 


3 


139 


167 


12,753 27 


194 


32,627 71 


201 


21,935 85 


188 


30,003 08 


4 


135 
139 
151 


21,012 09 
114,861 56 


166 


10,865 00 
179,458 10 


195 


1,337 50 


?01 


1,169 90 
220,538 58 






74,071 52 
1,110,992 11 


g 


135 


166 


195 


248,174 87 


201 


188 


175,284 20 


6 


136 


376 83 


167 


54,935 28 


195 


90,352 39 


201 


104,494 68 


188 


70,453 84 


320,613 02 


7 


143 


835 53 


170 


33,388 99 


195 


63,659 29 


201 


76,842 44 


189 


56,081 87 


235,808 12 


8 


138 


759 GO 


170 


2,810 00 
10,519 11 


195 


2,415100 






189 


80 00 


10,810 25 
92,112 64 





135 


20,874 94 


166 


193 


11,922 20 


200 


25,107 73 


187 


23,688 66 


10 


207,365 05 




468,374 10 




647,945 48 




780,858 57 




1,794,967 38 


4,234,654 12 





46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Yearly Expenditure on CANALS 

CONSTRUCT 

ONTA 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


E 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


Cornwall 


III. 

46 


$ cts. 
2,786 00 


I. 
153 


$ cts. 
10,692 04 


I. 
176 


$ cts. 
17,780 05 


I. 
194 


$ cts. 
7 50 


II. 
331 

"249 

246 

249 
329 

246 
249 
249 


$ cts. 
10,000 21 

"*i**077 00' 

16,826 16- 
42,876 60 

4,967 50 

949 35 


2 
3 


do Enlargement. . 
Williamsburgh 


4 


Welland 


I. 

115 
III. 

42 


12,097 84 


152 


43,486 36 


176 


22,173 72 


193 


48,569 10 


5 


do Enlargement.. 


r> 


Rideau 


I. 

115 

III. 

42 

I. 
121 


7,298 12 
400 00 






176 


13 16 


193 
194 
281 


11,732 98 


7 


Murray Canal Sur- 
vey 






8 


Sault Ste. Marie 
Canal Survey 


9 


St. Lawrence (Pro- 
portion of expen- 
diture) 




















Totals 
























22,581 96 


54,178 40 




39,966 93 




60,309 58 




76,696 82J 


NORTH-WESTJ! 


1 


Canal and Land 










313 


15,232 30 


300 


17,443 35 








Surveys 














CANALS 


1 


Canals Generally... 




... 


' 








253 


1 138 5(1 








.... 





















Abstr 


act Statement of Expenditure 


1 


Nova Scotia 




21,519 72 




70,719 80 




46,193 57 










2 


New Brunswick 






17,929 34 
38,190 62 
60,309 58 
17,443 35 




6,399 4J 

205,838 7| 

76,696 8j 


3 


Quebec 




84,863 67 
22,581 96 




2,055 00 
54,178 40 




4,195 46 
39,966 93 
15,232 30 




4 


Ontario 




5 


N.-West Territories. 
Canah Generally... 




6 














1,138 5^ 




Totals 




128.965 35 




126,953 20 




105,588 26 




133,872 89 




290,073 A 












6 








; 







4G Victoria 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
TIOX— Concluded. 

RIO. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


93 

a 

a 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


11. 


$ Ct3. 


II. 


% cts. 


% cts. 




no 


1,011 75 






194 


1,780 00 










44,057 55 

49,211 37 

1,077 00 

172,122 90 
5,707,746 67, 


1 












188 


49,211 37 


•> 


















3 


135 
138 


21,132 00 






197 


7,137 72 


?77 


700 00 






4 


135 
138 


109,026 47 


165 


746,420 61 


197 


1,039,982 19 


203 


1,569,478 19 


194 


2,199,962 61 


5 


138 


18,070 97 


17C 


5,793 16 


195 


9,310 85 


201 


2,163 96 


189 


214 11 


59,564 81 

400 00 
949 35 


6 

7 






















8 


135 


12,366 75 


166 


16,022 19 


193 


8,689 16 


200 


25,107 74 


187 


23,688 65 


85,874 49 


9 




161,607 94 




768,235 96 




1,066,899 92 




1,597,449 89 


2,273,076 74 


6,121,004 14 





TERRITORIES. 



32,675 65 1 



GENERALLY. 



1,133 50 1 



on Canals — Construction. 



14,943 83 
207,365 05 
161,607 94 



383,916 82 



4,018 90 
468,374 10 
768,235 96 



1,240,628 96 



20 97 

443 00 

647,945 48 

1,066,899 92 



1,715,309 37 



11,125 00 

110 75 

780,858 57 

1,597,449 89 



2,389,544 21 



63,330 18 

22 30 

1,794,967 38 

2,273,076 74 



4,131,396 60 



212,909 24 


43,867 53 


4,234,654 12 


6,121,004 14 


32,675 65 


1,138 50 


10,646,249 18 






ii 


i Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 






A 


. 1883 i 


1 

Yearly Expenditure on CANALS J 

STAFF, Ee| 

NOVA! 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 1 


03 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


] 


St. Peter's— 
Staff 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


I. 

281 
281 


$ cts. 

225 36 
555 78 


II. 

333 
333 


$ cts. II 

280 00| 
6,122 07j 


2 


















Totals 




























781 14 




6,402 07 1 




















QtlEi 


i 


Lachine— 


T. 

203 

203 

III. 

63 


10,745 35 

13,742 05 
10,431 51 


I. 
236 

236 
236 
244 


10,539 79 

14,209 ©2 

12,085 84 

101 OS 


I. 

291 

291 
291 


9,670 41 

15,834 49 
13,302 39 


I. 

279 

279 
279 


9,440 82 

17,478 52 
15,093 25 


II. 

330 

330 
330 


8,654 IS] 

16,076 9C-I 
12,334 6S| 


? 


Staff 






4 


Refunds 

Totals 

Beaulmrnois — 




















I. 

202 

202 

III. 

62 

62 


34,918 91 




36,935 73 




38,807 29 




42,012 59 




37,065 8(1 


B 


776 08 

9,349 99 
6,216 98 


235 

23.5 
235 


789 73 

9,626 99 
6,498 57 


289 

289 
290 


776 32 

10,117 57 
6,384 81 


277 

277 

277 


785 42 

12,316 53 
5,722 36 


330 

330 
331 


796 5:1 

11,792 4(1 
15,733 3fl 


6 


Staff 


7 


Repairs 


R 


Refunds 




Totals 

Ste. Anne's Lock — 


























16,343 05 


239 

239 
239 


16,915 29 




17,278 70 




18,824 31 




28,322 3:1 


9 


I. 

206 

206 

III. 

65 

65 


654 20 

778 16 
432 47 


652 29 

1,062 96 
1,873 51 


293 

293 
293 


654 94 

1,136 54 
1,280 36 


281 

282 
282 


720 01 

1,285 84 
1,539 02 


334 

334 
334 


726 J 

1,106 8f 
1,393 6,1 


10 
1 1 


Staff. 

Repairs 


12 


Refunds 




Totals 

Carillon and Gren- 
ville— 
Collection 
























I. 

2C6 

206 

111 

61 

64 


1,864 83 




3,588 76 




3,071 84 




3,544 87 




3,227 2l 


11 


65 12 

6,301 88 
8,911 28 


239 

239 
239 


78 29 

6,549 38 
10,157 42 


293 

293 
293 


83 63 

6,617 81 
9,852 09 


281 

281 
281 


740 40 

8,676 90 
8,218 24 


333 

333 
333 


542 6M 

8,324 5l 
17,235 3| 


14 


Staff 


i r > 


Repairs 


16 


Refunds 




• Totals 


























15,278 28 




16,785 09 




16,553 53 




17,635 54 




26,102 4i 












8 















4( 


) Victor 


ia. 




Sessional Pape 


rs (No. 10.) 




A. 18S3 


for the undermentioned years. 
PAIRS, &c. 

SCOTIA. 


! 30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




_ ' " 

1873. 


1874. 

• 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


03 

a 


- 

219 
; 220 


$ cts. 

343 32 

6,539 58 


II. 

202 
202 


$ cts. 

725 93 
1,558 57 


II. 

255 
255 


$ cts. 

560 00 
889 35 


II. 

282 
282 


$ cts. 
641 55 


II. 

264 
264 


$ Cts. 

600 00 
17 45 


$ cts. 

3,376 16 
15,682 80 


i 









6,882 90 




2,284 50 


1,449 35 




641 55 





617 45 


19,058 96 




BEC. 


216 

217 
217 


8,852 93 

23,601 03 
34,300 60 


II. 

200 

200 
200 
208 


9,040 38 

25.811 07 

22,828 66 

156 79 


11. 
253 

253 
253 
262 


9,306 62 

28,592 01 

30,057 34 

111 80 


II. 
280 

280 
280 
287 


9,218 11 

33,797 73 
29,103 65 

30 78 


II. 

262 

292 
262 
368 


9,855 53 

33,148 86 

19,824 33 

250 12 

63,078 84 


95,324 12 

222,291 71 

199,362 26 

650 57 

517,628 66 


i 

2 
3 

4 








— 

217 

217 
217 


66,754 56 




57,836 90 




68,067 77 




72,150 27 




896 47 

12,210 73 
9,882 06 


199 

199 
200 


896 78 

15,392 51 
10,990 56 


252 

252 
252 


901 49 

14,399 32 
12,253 01 


280 

280 
280 
287 


1,135 03 

14,465 86 

17,170 83 

65 02 


261 

261 

261 


1,094 80 

14,377 63 
15,207 36 


8,848 63 

124,049 59 

106,059 92 

65 02 


5 

6 

7 

8 


















219 

219 
219 


22,989 26 




27,279 85 


27,553 82 




32,836 74 




30,679 79 

949 07 

1,982 65 
1,756 93 


239,023 16 




918 83 

2,199 64 
1,264 40 


202 

202 
202 


874 34 

2,614 90 
7,208 63 


255 

255 
255 


894 40 

1,859 20 
4,506 68 


282 

282 
282 


922 44 

1,952 14 
4,033 72 


264 

264 
264 


7,967 30 

15,978 83 
25,289 35 


9 

10 
11 

12 
























4,382 87 




10,697 87 




7,260 28 




6,908 30 


4,688 65 


49,235 48 




219 

219 
219 


899 15 

10,068 28 
8,781 50 


201 

201 
201 


1,206 82 

10,710 88 
10,605 82 


254 

254 
255 


1,046 03 

10,378 57 
18,520 44 


282 

282 
282 


1,494 91 

10,764 38 
11,475 96 


263 

263 
263 

268 


1,279 28 

11,050 27 

10,304 06 

703 58 


7,436 24 

89,442 86 

114,062 12 

703 58 


13 

14 
15 
16 


. 



















19,748 93 




22,523 52 




29,945 04 




23,735 25 


23,337 19 


211,644 80 
















y 













4C Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188 



Yearly Expenditure on CANAL! 

STAFF, El 

QUEBEC; ; 





Name 
of 

Work. 


- " "'" ' " ,,- l 

Year endeji 


= 


1863. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


17 


St. Ours Lock — 
Collection 

Staff 


I. 

207 

207 

III. 

65 

65 


$ cts. 
403 22 

1,532 75 
753 74 


I. 
239 

239 
240 


$ cts. 
408 68 

1,755 15 
1,399 18 


I. 

294 

294 
294 


$ cts. 

406 77 

1,453 09 
1,006 22 


I. 

282 

282 
282 


% cts. 
434 36 

1,414 48 
1,210 98 


II. 
334 

334 
334 


$ c. 
400 ■ 

1,565M 


19 




1,263J| 


20 








Totals 

Chambly — 


205 

208 

III. 

64 

64 






















2,689 71 




3,563 01 




2,871 08 


279 

280 
280 


3,059 82 




3,229£ 


21 


1,810 92 

8,312 90 
9,355 70 


237 

237 
238 


1,854 40 

8,437 22 
13,120 97 


292 

292 
292 


1,802 40 

8,934 41 
20,180 73 


2,266 14 

10,214 71 
22,426 33 


332 

332 
332 


2,1931 


00 


Staff 


9,628 ft 
22,327)* 


'-: 


Repairs 


■>4 


Refunds 




Totals 

Grand Totals... 
























19,479 52 




23,412 59 




30,917 54 


34,907 18 




34,149: 






90,574 30 


101,200 47 




109,499 98 




119,934 31 




132,09613 


ONI 


1 


Well and— 


I. 

201 

201 
III. 

62 
I. 

201 
III. 

62 
211 


6,087 41 

37,679 05 

38,852 96 
32 40 


I. 

234 

234 

161 
235 

244 


5,964 99 

39,060 61 

50,773 03 
206 73 


I. 

288 

289 

289 
297 
298 


6,062 10 

40,340 45 

65,009 19 
207 38 


I. 

276 

276 

195 
277 


6,593 39 
42,383 33 
53,381 02 


II. 
328 

328 

329 


6,351|$ 


? 


Staff 


37,085|T 


3 


Repairs 


50,276 


4 


Refunds 






Totals 












82,651 82 




96,005 36 




111,619 12 




102,357 74 




93,71^1 




Cornwall — 

Collection 

Staff 






5 


I. 

202 

202 

III. 

63 

203 

III. 

63 


650 25 

11,244 47 

3,774 18 


235 
235 
235 


647 50 

10,347 91 

3,859 14 


290 
290 
290 


643 85 

10,368 16 

7,145 42 


277 
277 
278 


657 21 

11,848 39 

8,891 61 


331 
331 
331 


67^ : 

10,59-- 
8,16: 'C 


7 


Repairs 


B 








Totals 






, >■ — 




















15,668 90 


14,854 55 




18,157 43 


21,397 21 




19,43»fl 












10 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
JPAIES, &c— Continued. 

Concluded. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


JO 

B 


II. 

219 

219 

219 


$ cts. 
543 60 

2,076 50 
1,575 10 


II. 
202 

202 

202 


% cts. 
502 26 

2,219 13 
2,363 42 


II. 
255 

255 

255 


$ cts. 
523 00 

1,362 22 
1,245*69 


II. 
283 

283 
283 


$ cts. 
523 70 

1,403 92 
1,601 71 


II. 

264 

264 
264 


$ cts. 
519 57 

1,533 40 
750 80 


$ cts. 
4,665 33 

16,321 44 
13,170 03 


17 

18 
19 



























218 

218 
218 


4,195 20 


5,084 81 




3,130 91 


3,529 33 


263 

263 
263 


2,803 77 


34,156 80 




2,420 92 

10,390 44 
11,789 27 


201 

201 
201 


2,336 62 

11,675 67 
16,427 19 


254 

254 

254 
262 


2,358 22 

12,201 99 

16,306 91 

12 50 


281 

281 
281 
288 


2,352 84 

10,593 14 

13,273 56 

10 62 


2,458 41 

10,281 78 
10,111 32 


21,854 06 

100,670 76 

155,319 97 

23 12 


21 

22 
23 
24 
















24,600 63 




30,439 48 




30,879 62 




26,230 16 




22,851 51 


277,867 91 




142,671 45 




153,862 43 


166,837 44 




165,390 05 




147,439 75 


1,329,556 81 




RIO. 


215 

215 
216 


6,663 59 
45,382 99 
66,550 73 


II. 

199 

199 

199 

208 


6,591 37 

50,966 48 

103,666 99 
1,371 75 


II. 
251 

251 

252 

262 


6,209 72 

52,595 00 

88,539; 99 
1,798 92 


II. 

279 

279 

279 

287 


6,620 13 

57,623 31 

81,376 12 
2,505 17 


II. 

261 

261 

261 
268 


6,527 09 

59,963 47 

49,783 93 
697 26 


63,670 94 

463,080 06 

648,210 86 
6,819 61 


1 

2 

3 
4 










118,597 31 




162,596 59 




149,143 63 




148,124 73 


116,971 75 


1,181,781 47 




-17 
217 


904 82 
13,042 25 
12,467 65 


200 
200 
200 


867 39 

13,405 20 

7,610 70 


253 
253 
253 


868 G7 

13,351 91 

7,097 34 


281 
281 

281 

287 


912 45 

13,320 61 

6,423 67 
65 02 


262 

262 

262 
268 


1,209 50 

13,375 70 

6,440 54 
94 40 


8,064 35 

120,S98 90 

71,873 95 
159 42 


5 

6 

7 
R 
















26,414 72 




21,883 29 




• 21,317 92 




20,751 75 




21,120 14 


200,996 62 
















11 


v 











4C Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188: 



Yearly Expenditure on CANAL' 



STAFF, E 

ONTARIO- 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year endec 


I 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


9 
1(1 


Willi am sburgh — 
Collection 

Staff 


I. 

203 

204 

III. 

63 

204 

III. 

63 


$ cts. 
1,125 00 

5,745 97 

6,442 41 


I. 

237 

237 

237 


$ cts. 
1,125 00 

5,769 81 

5,670 88 


I. 

290 

291 
291 


$ cts. 
1,125 00 

5,573 13 

6,546 16 


I. 

278 

278 
278 


$ cts. 
1,150 00 

6,382 17 

5,308 41 


II. 
331 

331 

331 


$ ci 
1.150 

5,542 

3,230 


11 
I 9 


Repairs 

Refunds 




Totals 

Burlington Bay — 
Ferryman, &c... 
Repairs 
























13,313 38 




12,565 69 




13,244 29 




12,840 58 




9,923 


13 
14 


I. 

204 
204 
211 


500 00 

57 32 

5 10 


237 
237 


500 00 
577 94 


291 
292 


500 00 
47 27 


279 
279 


479 70 
94 69 


332 
332 


373 
1,014 


l r >' 


Refunds 




Totals 

Rideau — 

Collection 

Staff 








547 27 














562 42 




1,077 94 





574 39 




1,387 


16 

17 


205 

205 

III. 

64 

64 


371 90 

18,397 28 

16,475 21 

10 42 


238 

238 
238 
244 


377 72 

19,250 71 

13,140 77 

288 46 


293 

293 
293 


343 42 

20,022 37 
19,469 33 


280 

280 
280 


1,403 17 

22,814 58 
18,120 52 


333 

333 
333 


1,245 

22.132 
14,005 


is 


Repairs 


19 


Refunds 




Totals 

Grand Totals..: 


















35,244 81 


33,057 66 




39,835 12 




42,338 27 




37,39C 







147,441 33 




157,561 20 




183,403 23 




179,508 19 


161,84£ 



MISCELLANE( 



Miscellaneous on 
Canals 



211 
III. 

68 



8,205 51 



244 



3,203 51 



298 



8.583 48 



231 
285 
286 



2,109 71 



334 
337 
338 



ABSTKACT STATEMENT OF EXP 



1 


Nova Scotia 















781 14 

119,984 31 

179,508 19 

2,109 71 




6,40| 
132,091 
161,841 

M9| 


?, 


Quebec 




90,574 30 

147,441 33 

8,205 51 




101.200 47 

157,561 20 

3,203 51 




109,499 98 
183,403 23 

8,583 48 




3 


Ontario 




4 


Miscellaneous 






Totals 








246,221 14 


261,965 18 




301,486 69 




302,383 35 




302,24|i 



12 



'G Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



or the undermentioned years — Concluded. 
? AIRS, &c— Concluded. 

Concluded. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


o 

S 


[I. 

218 

218 

,,, 


$ ctg. 
1,175 CO 

6,424 49 

7,347 75 


II. 
201 

201 

201 


$ cts. 
1,175 00 

6,857 19 

7,395 92 


II. 
253 

253 

253 


$ cts. 
1,175 00 

6,547 62 

4,110 29 


n. 

281 
281 

281 

287 


$ cts. 
1,175 00 

7,418 39 

11,690 98 
65 01 


II. 
263 

263 

263 


$ cts. 
1,150 00 

7,388 08 

10,053 61 


$ cts. 
11,525 00 

63,649 79 

67,796 48 
65 01 


9 

10 
11 






















14,947 24 




15,428 11 


255 
256 


11,832 91 

300 00 
369 05 


20,349 38 


263 
263 

268 


18,591 69 

303 78 

489 34 

13 40 


143,036 28 




!18 


300 00 


201 


300 00 




3,556 87 

4,140 74 

75 41 


n 


282 


1,490 86 


1*1 


19 




208 


56 91 


i f i 












300 00 




356 91 




669 05 




1,490 86 


806 52 


7,773 02 




1,459 35 

22,841 51 
26,074 49 


198 

198 
198 

208 


1,933 89 

26,815 44 

22,957 40 

105 48 


250 

250 
250 


2,227 85 

26,553 37 
19,699 81 


278 

278 
278 
288 


2,089 16 

26,430 77 

14,428 25 

17 67 


260 

260 
260 


2,122 69 

25,959 56 
14,198 18 


13,574 73 

231,225 07 

178,569 28 

412 03 


16 

17 

18 
1*} 














50,375 35 




51,812 21 




48,481 03 




42,965 85 




42,280 43 


423,781 11 




... 


210,634 62 




252,077 11 




231,444 54 




233,682 57 




199,770 53 


1,957,368 50 




N* CANALS. 


20 
23 


8,152 45 


203 
208 


6,546 96 


255 
256 


2,145 90 


283 

288 


3,193 23 


264 
266 
268 


3,098 46 


47,136 05 


1 


w 


:URE ON CANALS— STAFF, &c. 


- 


6,882 90 
142,671 45 
210,634 62 

8,152 45 




2,284 50 
153,862 43 
252,077 11 

6,546 96 




1,449 35 
166,837 44 
231,444 54 

2,145 90 




641 55 

165,390 05 

233,682 57 

3,193 23 




617 45 

147,439 75 

199,770 53 

3, €98 46 


19,058 96 
1,329,556 81 
1,957,368 50 

47,136 05 


1 
2 
3 
4 


368,341 42 


414,771 00 


401,877 23 




402,907 40 


350,926 19 


3,353,120 32 





13 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



i 

a. issa;; 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

NOvJ 



1 

v. 2 

3 

% 4 

- 5 

*n 6 

7 

8 



Name 

of 
Work. 



Halifax Dominion 
Buildings 

Halifax Quarantine 
Station (Lawlor's 
Island) 

Pictou Custom 
House 

Pictou Quarantine 
Station 

Sydney Marine Hos- 
pital 

Sydney Quarantine 
Station 

Yarmouth Marine 
Hospital 

Yarmouth Quaran- 
tine Station 



Totals. 



Year endedw 



1868. 



$ cts. 



1869. 



$ cts. 



1870. 



$ cts. 



1871. 



197 



$ cts. 



7,786 67 



II. 
248 

255 



1872. 

84,000 (I 
3,075 ]| 



87,075 



PRINCE ED 


1 


Charlottetown Do- 
minion Buildings. 

Souris Marine Hos- 
pital 

Totals 






















^ 2 

































































NE' 



1 

2 

N 3 

4 

">. 5 



Chatham Custom 

House 

Dorchester Peniten- 
tiary 

Middle Island or Mi- 
ramichi Quaran- 
tine Station 

Newcastle Custom 

House 

St. Andrew's Marine 

Hospital 

do QuarantineSt'n 
St. John Custom 

House 

do Post Office 

do QuarantineSt'n 

Partridge Is'd 

do Savings Bank. . 

Westcock Marine 

Hospital 



Totals 75,797 



197 
203 



75,797 88 



254 

255 
253 



14/206 t 

3,998 3 
26,853 1 



45,0589 



Destroyed by fire on 20th June, 1877. 



14 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



or the undermentioned years. 



ION. 

COTIA. 






















30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


a 


F 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
84,000 00 

24,941 44 
25,060 05 
4,090 00 
9,276 57 
16 95 
3,5!>0 00 
3,332 12 


1 


.48 
i50 


11,429 65 
4 50 


180 

179 
180 


2,650 00 

274 75 

4,090 00 


228 


3,330 33 


257 


14,086 00 


245 


7,364 47 


2 
3 
4 






229 
229 
229 
229 


157 45 

16 95 

3,000 00 

3,180 00 


258 


6,995 52 


244 


2,123 60 


5 

n 






244 


550 00 


7 


258 


152 12 


R 
















.... 


11,434 15 




7,014 75 


9,684 73 




21,233 64 




10,038 07 


154,267 13 





RD ISLAND. 







183 


69,000 00 














69,000 00 
4,385 62 


] 






237 


3 00 


258 


3,574 87 


245 


807 75 


3 


















69,000 00 




3 00 




3,574 87 




807 75 


73,385 62 





RDNSWICK. 



149 


10,060 00 


178 


1,538 70 


228 


1,393 07 










12,991 77 
42,154 22 

4,173 70 

4,830 00 

5,588 44 
330 00 

75,797 88 
178,940 86 

7,308 46 
47,784 28 

3,416 93 


1 


260 


21,860 00 


247 


20,294 22 


9 


'49 


1,118 40 
4,000 00 


181 
178 
181 


3,044 80 

830 00 

4,565 58 
330 00 


228 

227 


10 50 
1,022 86 


3 

4 
5 














8 








7 


z 


7,860 99 

2,555 70 
6,472 67 


180 

181 
180 

181 


46,988 50 

362 45 
14,457 79 

3,200 00 


227 
228 


78,495 30 
392 13 


257 


27,243 37 


245 


4,146 31 


8 
9 


.48 










10 




227 


216 93 




49,103 37 






1] 








....| 32,067 76 




75,317 82 




81,530 79 




24,440 53 


383,316 54 
















15 
















46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10. 


) 




a. iss3i; 
1 


Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS;] 

CONSTRUCj] 
QUJEJj 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 1 


to 

6 
a 


1868. 


1869 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


Argenteuil Court 
House 


I. 


$ cts. 


III. 

14 
14 


$ cts. 

1,377 20 
178 66 


I. 


$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts: ; 


o 


Beauharnois Jail.... 


















3 


Grosse Isle Quaran- 
tine Station 

Kamouraska Jail.... 


98 

III. 

41 


2,501 90 










255 


6,823 9H 


4 


14 


61 80 










5 


Levis Immigrant 
Shed 














255 


13,108 el 


6 


Malbaie Court 
House and Jail.... 

Montreal Custom 

House (new). 

do Examining 

Warehouse ... 


III. 
81 


228 50 














7 






183 


75 00 


197 
199 
202 


216,109 63 






8 














g 


do Immigrant 
Shed 


















255 
253 

256 
258 


4,559 ll 

150,136 lh: 

6,310 « 


10 


do Post Office 


















n 


do Purchase o f 
Land 










181 


9,926 98 


199 


4,730 60 


12 


Quebec Custom 
House (new). 

do Marine Hospital 

do New Jail 

do Observatory (re- 
building) 


124 
III. 

47 


1,331 60 






13 


















14 


III. 
81 


2,687 25 


















15 


















16 


do Post Office 
(new) 














197 


22,183 38 


252 


32,715 fl 


17 


Sheibooke Immi- 
grant Station 

do New Jail 

St. Vincent de Paul 
Penitentiary 

Three Rivers Cus- 
tom House 














Ifi 


III 
81 

45 


4,257 20 
1,898 15 


III. 
14 


500 CO 


III. 
10 


1,227 19 


204 

III. 

3 


849 24 






19 


256 


110,000 hjj 


20 
















Totals 
























12,904 60 




2,117 66 




11,229 17 




243,872 85 




323,654 1 












16 















4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
TION. 



bec. 



\ 
30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


4> 

Xi 

a 


II. { $ cts. 


II. 1 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

1,377 20 
178 66 

34,785 01 

ei 80 

20,468 20 
228 50 

219,610 76, 
185,276 07 

17,811 15 
460,426 38 

105,724 56 

1,331 60 
9,008 35 

2,687 25 
8,767 76 

105,088 40 
1,334 40 

6,833 63 

122,531 54 
10,534 68 


1 








?, 


147 


3,132 06 


179 


6,297 71 


225 


1,661 85 


255 


10,695 90 


243 


3,671 68 


3 

4 


147 


3,957 94 


179 


3,401 61 














5 


226 

227 

226 
231 
226 

"225 
335 

225 
235 


3,426 13 
203 41 

7,543 30 
129,490 57 

7,004 86 

1,798 87 
5,348 80 










6 

7 










256 


74,843 51 


244 


110,229 15 


9 


1147 
•|l47 

146 


2,993 69 
49,030 59 


179 
179 


2,715 00 
59,985 98 

3,547 95 


Q 


236 
255 


71,783 14 
2,003 49 






10 






11 

1"2 


.... 

146 

147 


16,712 81 
1,000 00 


98 

178 
179 


6,968 89 

16,940 76 
334 40 


n 


244 


11,186 95 


14 
15 

16 






17 














18 










100 

226 


649 13 
7,981 73 


260 


4,076 87 


247 


5,907 39 


19 






179 


2,552 95 


ao 
















... 


158,035 59 




102,745 25 




165,108 65 




163,402 91 




130,995 17 


1,314,065 90 





17 



10a~2 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 









Yearly Expenditure on 


PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

CONSTRUE 

ontaJ 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 1 


09 

-a 
£ 

525 




1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


Al gora a Court 
House and Jail... 

Gu«>lph Custom 


III. 
45 


$ cts. 
207 20 


III. 
6 


$ cts. 
1,608 94 


I. 

180 

III. 

3 


$ cts. 
3,224 99 


I. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts.ij 


2 










3 

4 


Hamilton PostOffice 
Kings tonlmmigrant 


















255 


4,024 Oil 


5 


do Military Build- 
ings and For- 
tifications. ... 




















8 


do Military-College 
London Custom 






















7 














197 


19,282 90 


254 


11,119 8» 


8 


do ImmigrantShed 
do Post Office 














9 














197 
193 


3,000 00 
43,257 16 






10 
11 


Ottawa Parliament 
and Depart- 
mental Build- 
ings 

do Post Office and 
CustomHouse 
&c 


I. 

121 
III. 

44 


41,689 63 


I. 

155 

III. 

6 


16,548 29 


178 


39,921 19 


248 
253 


68,745 SB 

90 C 


1? 


Rideau Hall 


I. 

124 
III. 

47 


51,029 10 


I. 

157 


93,178 85 


I. 

182 


11,757 79 






13 


Toronto Custom 

House (new). 

do Examining 

Warehouse ... 










14 






















15 


do Immigrant 
Sheds 














197 


13,126 73 






16 


do Post Office 
(new) 










253 


37,224 (II 


17 


St. Catharines Ma- 
rine Hospital 
















Totals 



























92,925 93 


111,336 08 




62,285 55 




82,6i3 65 




121,203 | 

















































MAI 


1 


Stoney Mountain 
Penitentiary 


















II. 




2 


Winnipeg Custom 
House, <fec 






















3 


Winnipeg Immigra- 
tion Station 


















255 


308 

308 ; 




Totals. 


































































18 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1885 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

TION— Continued. 
RIO. 



30th June. 



1873. 



II. 



147 
148 
147 



136 
137 



146 



$ cts. 



1874. 



$ cts. 



177 



12,831 48 

2,012 80 

268 17 



99,517 00 
24,036 46 



178 
178 



146 






146 



40,051 48 



25,954 15 



204,671 54 



168 
176 



177 



9,295 72 



10,349 26 
3,420 00 



135,963 72 
46,169 18 



1875. 



II. 



223 



143 



223 
223 



201 



224 



55,141 94 



177 



34,534 85 



294,874 67 



223 
223 
224 
224 



$ cts. 



29,514 10 



1876. 



II. 



252 
264 



$ cts 



254 
255 
255 



1,989 34 
3,500 00 



189,484 11 



69,377 60 



65,357 64 



475 74 
5,933 21 



412,384 76 



264 



206 



253 



253 



263 
276 



255 



2,039 35 



53,320 19 
5,643 05 



3 72 



1877. 



242 



243 

243 



267,839 73 
72,704. 59 



31,694 06 
149,562 41 



9,338 54 
2,000 00 



594,145 64 



$ cts, 



Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 



13,111 74 



18,888 86 
14,840 93 



196 



243 

250 



242 
241 



251 



258,833 09 



18,451 24 



41,939 18 
33,196 87 



2,346 72 



401,608 63 



$ cts. 



5,041 13 



13,111 74 



17,508 67 
4,024 08 



101,723 15 
20,483 98 

53,583 46 
7,425 86 
6,768 17 



1,161,799 44 
230,829 07 

155,965 74 

234,184 30 

223,338 70 

11,834 18 

128,458 20 

2,000 00 



2,378,079 87 



TOBA. 






















II. 




II. 

181 
181 


51 22 
6,724 66 


II. 

229 

229 


35,752 28 
27,503 59 


II. 

260 

259 


60,597 20 
40,092 49 


II. 

247 

245 


39,791 04 
5,057 98 


136,191 74 

79,488 29 

7,050 58 


I 


148 
148 


109 57 
6,742 58 


2 
3 






















6,852 15 




6,775 88 




63,255 87 




100,689 69 




44,849 02 


222,730 61 






10 a - 


2h 








19 













46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883, 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

CONSTRUC 

NORTH WEST 





Name 
of 

Work. 


Year ended 


3 

53 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 




Battleford Buildings 

Fort Pelly Barracks 

do Government 

House 

Buildings at Forts 
MacLeod, Walsh 
and Calgarry 

Totals 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


2 






















3 






















4 






























BRITISH 


1 


New Westminster 
Penitentiary 






















2 


Victoria Custom 
House, &c... 






















Ni 3 


do Marine Hospital 
Totals 

































































PUBLIC BCIL.D!XGi 



Public Buildin_ 
Generally I 122 



130 18 



II. 
256 



1,687 it 













Abstract 


Statement 


1 of Expenditure o 


1 


Nova Scotia 
















7,786 67 




87,075 j 


2 


P. E. Island 
















3 


New Brunswick 
















75,797 88 

243,872 85 

82,643 65 




45,058 j 
323,654 
121,2M 
308 


4 


Quebec 




12,904 60 
92,925 93 




2,117 66 
111,336 08 




11,229 17 
62,285 55 




5 


Ontario 




6 


Manitoba 




7 


N.-W. Territories ... 




















8 


British Columbia.... 






















9 


Public Buildings 
Generally 

Totals 


.... 


130 18 
















1,637 |i 




















105,960 71 




113,453 74 




73,514 72 




410,101 05 




578,936 












20 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

TION— Concluded. 
TERRITORIES. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


3. 

§ 




$ cts 




$ cts. 


II. 


% cts. 


II. 

259 
259 


$ cts. 

8,000 00 
33,966 94 


II. 

246 
246 


$ cts. 

55,412 12 

15,000 00 


$ cts. 

63,412 12 
78,287 85 


-[ 










230 


29,320 91 


2 
3 




































29,320 91 




41,966 94 




70,412 12 


141,699 97 

















COLUMBIA. 



II. 




II. 

182 

182 
182 


136 72 

22,844 88 
15,474 57 


II. 

231 

230 
231 


1.571 98 

20,311 86 
2,978 86 


II. 

260 

259 


78,114 79 
14,731 83 


II. 

248 


47,218 11 


127,041 60 

64,344 94 
18,635 43 


1 


149 


6,456 37 
182 00 


9 


149 






■; 
















6,638 37 




38,456 17 




24,862 70 




92,846 62 




47,218 11 


210,021 97 





GENERALLY. 



II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 








149 








231 
















150 


2,330 55 


183 


6,778 19 


236 


14,660 97 


263 


8,519 56 


247 


5,870 89 


39,928 16 


1 



PUBLIC BUILDINaS— Construction. 



11,434 15 



32,067 76 

158,035 59 

204,671 54 

6,852 15 



6,638 37 

2,330 55 



422,030 11 



7,014 75 

69,000 00 

75,317 82 

102,745 25 

294,874 67 

6,775 88 




38,456 17 
6,778 19 




600,962 73 





9,684 73 




3 00 




81,530 79 




165,108 65 




412,384 76 




63,255 87 




29,320 91 




24,862 70 




14,660 97 




800,812 38 





21,233 64 




3,574 87 




49,103 37 




163,402 91 




594,145 64 




100,689 69 




41,966 94 




92,846 62 




8,519 56 




1,075,483 24 





10,038 07 

807 75 

24.440 53 

130,995 17 

401,608 63 

44,849 02 

70,412 12 

47,218 11 

5.870 89 



r36,240 29 



154.267 


13 


73,385 


C2 


383,316 54 


1,314,065 


90 


2,378,079 87 


222,730 61 


141,699 97 


210,021 


97 


39,928 


16 


4,91 7,495 


77 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS J 

EEp! 

NOVA I 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 1 


4/ 

B 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 

2 

g 


Halifax Dominion 

Building 

do Drill Shed 




$ cts. 




$ Ct3. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


II. 
259 


$ cts. 1 
14,094 38 1 


4 


do QuarantineSt'n 
(Lawlor's Is- 
land) 






















» 5 


Pictou Quarantine 






















6 


Yarmouth Quaran- 
tine Station 
























Totals 










































14,094 33if 

























PRINCE ED 



Charlottetown Do- 
minion Building.. 



NEW; 



1 


Fredericton Custom 
House 






















2 


Newcastle Custom 
House 






















3 


St. John Barracks... 






















4 
5 


do Custom House. 
do Penitentiary ... 


















259 


10,465 U 


6 


do Post Office (old) 

do QuarantineSt'n 
(Partridge Is- 
land) 

do Savings Bank. . 






















v 7 
8 


















259 


30 0C 


V 9 


Westcock Marine 
Hospital 




















Totals 








































10,495 1£ 

























4(j 


Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 


for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
AIES. 

SCOTIA. 


. 30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


01 
Xi 

3 
a 


II. 

155 


$ cts. 
7,702 41 


II. 

187 
183 


$ cts. 

4,529 90 
164 00 


II. 

236 


% cts. 
8,309 90 


II. 

265 


$ cts. 
7,754 05 


II. 

252 


$ cts. 
1,851 38 


$ cts. 

44,242 02 
164 00 
308 97 

1,766 20 

658 82 

35 00 


1 










261 

253 

265 


308 97 

1,010 00 
408 82 






3 










228 
228 


528 20 
250 00 


245 


228 00 


A 










5 










252 


35 00 


6 






















7,702 41 





4,693 90 




9,088 10 




9,481 84 




2,114 38 


47,175 01 




jWARD ISLAND. 






187 


200 00 


237 


2,920 89 


265 


1,341 10 


253 


5,464 89 


9.926 88 


1 








BRUNSWICK. 














187 


612 41 














612 41 
540 00 
396 78 

27,767 60 

522 18 
800 00 

28 00 
417 82 

1,797 44 


1 






142 

227 
237 


396 78 
4,401 65 


265 


90 00 


252 


450 00 


2 
3 


154 
155 


3,853 58 


187 


4,605 37 


257 
265 

261 


3,865 57 
151 33 


252 

248 
251 

252 
252 


576 28 

370 85 
800 00 

28 00 


4 

<5 











237 


387 82 


6 

7 
8 










265 


1,797 44 






A 






















3,853 58 




5,217 78 




5,186 25 




5,904 34 




2,225 13 


32,882 23 














K 


6 













1G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS! 

KEPAIRS-j 

QUEBEC- 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


s 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


21 


Brought forward. 

Quebec Custom 
House (old), 
now Immi- 
gration Office 

do Custom House 
(new) 


III. 


$ cts. 
1,740 14 


I. 
161 


$ cts. 
223 14 

68 38 


I. 

183 
184 


$ cts. 
1,061 47 

1,413 51 


I. 

201 
202 


$ cts. 
2,199 96 

23 00 
325 50 


II. 


$ cts. 
10,951 76 


22 






258 
259 


368 5 r A 


23 


do Durham Ter- 
race 


46 

I. 
124 


148 00 

305 00 












24 
25 


do Fortifications- 
do Gov. -General's 
Office 


















26 

27 


do Inspector of Gas 
Office 

do Jail (new) ... 










Tv! 

3 
3 


193 66 
50 66 






28 


do Leased Build- 
ings 










184 
184 


1,913 00 
1,216 92 






v 29 


do Marine Hospital 

do Observatory.... 

do Old Chateau 

St. Louis 

do Post Office (old) 

do do (temp'ry) 

do do (new) 


124 

in. 

46 
47 

I. 

122 
124 


1.550 00 

353 69 

75 00 
34 99 


160 
161 

161 

160 


1,231 01 
284 43 

75 00 






30 










31 














32 




18-1 


333 05 










33 








202 


1,056 23 


258 


256 5 


34 
















35 


do Public Build- 
ings 


123 
III. 

46 

47 

I. 

123 
124 
III. 

46 

81 


2,647 47 

1,472 26 
78 34 


160 

160 
161 


10 40 
2,803 87 






202 
202 


300 00 
20 82 






36 
37 


do Spenccrwood. . 

Sorel Court House 
and Jail 

St. Helen's Island 
Magazine 


184 
185 

III 
3 


2,640 18 
842 30 


256 


22 8 


38 














39 


St. Regis Custom 
House 






















40 


Three Rivera Cus- 
tom House.... 






















41 


do Old Barracks... 
Totals 


























8,404 89 




4,696 23 




9,420 43 




4,174 83 




11,599 A 



























1G Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18S3 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 










Continued. 








Concluded. 










, 30th June. 






Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 




1876. 




1877. 


0? 

£2 

a 


















& 


II. 


% cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 






16,617 85 




31,243 17 




5,665 49 




7,504 00 




6,717 13 


83,924 11 

1,509 89 
12,896 00 


21 


151 


2,591 89 


186 


5,157 95 


235 


3,221 69 


263 


1,195 85 


251 


34 60 


22 










235 
142 


201 20 

11,724 76 










349 20 

29,002 18 

305 00 
1.173 49 


23 










256 


14,592 23 


243 


2,685 19 


24 


















25^ 


















251 


1,173 49 


26' 
















• 




193 66 
1,963 66 
6,356 28 

725 55 

150 00 
368 04 

1,312 73 


9 7 






















'8 


; r 4 


385 00 


187 


1,973 35 
14 09 














*>9 


154 


49 42 


186 






263 


13 92 


251 


10 00 


30 






31 






















3? 






















33 














263 


3,054 41 
1,389 42 


251 


1,079 36 
75 40 


4,133 77 
4,422 69 

6,959 93 

920 64 

282 00 

89 90 


34 














263 


251 


3*> 





















36 








• 
















37 










142 


97 50 






251 


184 50 


38 


:54 


89 90 










39 














264 


581 88 






581 88 
76 95 


40 






41 






















19,734 0G 




38,388 56 




20.910 64 




28,408 66 
1 




11,959 67 


157,697 55 





























46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

REPAIRS-1 

ONTil 






19 



Name 

of 
Work. 



Hamilton Custom 
House 



do Post Office. 



Kingston Custom 

House 

do Immigrant 
Building 



do Penitentiary. 



do Post Office 

do Rockwood Asy- 
lum 

London Custom 

House 

do Drill Shed 



do Post Office 

Ottawa Major's Hill 



Ottawa Parliament 
and Depart '1 

Buildings 

do Gas 



do Heating. 



do Snow 

do Ventilation. 



do Post Office (old) 
do Public Build 
ings,P. Office 
and Rideau 
Hall (water) 



do Rideau Hall.... 
Carried forward. . 



Year ended! 



1868. 



I. 

123 



123 



122 
123 



122 

III. 

46 



$ cts. 
404 30 



52 31 



19,816 56 



14,377 99 



4,000 00 



38,651 10 



1869. 



160 



160 



159 
160 



159 



$ cts. 



100 00 



764 40 



1870. 



183 
184 



183 



!5,247 06 



*641 50 



8,917 78 



63 030 62 



183 

183 
184 
185 
III 
3 



I 

182 



$ cts 



852 60 



139 21 



93 00 



30,846 69 



26,535 62 



183 
184 



4,478 13 



1871. 



I. 
200 

202 

200 
202 



$ cts. 
30 00 

484 31 

1,728 40 



1872. 



200 
201 



201 



200 
201 



200 
201 
202 



199 



88 50 



207 70 
441 67 

36,767 75 



26,389 30 
2,155 50 



200 

2021 70 00 



199 
200 

202 



62,944 65 



3,761 24 



72,124 37 



II. 
259 



$ cts 
362 2 



254 
259 



256 
257 

259 



253 
253 



259 



253 
256 
259 



441 < 



39,91* 



36,028 
1,616 



661 



4,879 
83,907 



Departmental Buildings. 
28 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

Continued. 
RIO. 



30th June. 



1873. 



II. $ cts. 



154 



151 



159 



153 



101 75 



241 00 



48,198 03 



37,975 40 
1,383 90 



35 58 



1874. 



II. 
46 



185 



185 



187 



185 



187 



188 
189 



62.378 27 



150,313 93 



185 



% cts. 
1©2 90 



3,367 38 



2,821 42 



582 05 



8D,096 79 



40,308 67 

996 77 
11,820 23 



50,464 28 



190,560 49 



1875. 



236 

236 



236 



234 
232 



232 
232 



235 



$ cts. 



583 89 
136 13 



105 25 



117,640 84 
• 6,323 20 



40,331 54 
641 40 



39,150 58 



204,912 83 



1876. 



II. 
264 



264 



261 
264 



264 



262 
286 



265 
266 



$ eta. 
1,781 61 



85 67 



3,213 43 
14 45 



942 71 



263 



84,170 55 
12,000 00 



45,408 21 
598 40 



36,506 92 



184,721 95 



1877. 



II. 

251 

250 

251 

251 

248 
251 

351 
251 

251 

251 

250 



249 
253 



253 
253 



252 

250 



% cts. 
35 00 

41 54 

265 97 
248 22 

9,4S2 84 

149 11 

23 90 

1,007 OC 
600 00 

671 64 



97,735 13 
18,000 0< 



40,000 00 
548 80 



4,500 €0 
35,991 28 



209,300 43 



Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th, 
June, 1877. 



$ cts. 

3,568 66 

1,109 74 

5,837 61 

248 22 

12,696 27 

3,977 09 

23 90 

1.112 25 

600 CO 

3,086 78 



534 67 11 



582,550 45 
36,323 20 



332,601 33 



8,582 27 
11,820 23 



14 



767 33 17 



4,500 00 
250,528 12 



1,260,468 12 



29 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18S3 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDING* 

EEPAIRS- 

ONTARIO- 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


S 
a 
$5 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


20 


Brought forward. 

Ottawa RideauHall 

Fuel aud 

Lie-lit... 


I. 


$ Ct3. 

38,651 16 


I 


$ cts. 
63,030 62 


I. 


$ cts. 
62,944 65 




$ cts. 
72,124 37 


II. 


$ cts 
83,907 &. 


21 












184 


300 00 






258 


250 O 


22 


do Supreme Court 

(rent of rooms) 

Toronto Custom 

House (tem- 














23 


















256 


940 2 


24 


do Examining 
Warehouse ... 


















25 


do Government 
Building 

do Immigrant 
Sheds 


III. 

45 


267 55 


















26 














255 


372 5 


27 


do Inland Revenue 
Office 


















28 
^9 


do Magazine (old 
andnewForts) 
do PostOffice(new) 
do do (old) 
do Public Build- 
ings 






















SO 






160 
160 


400 00 
59 09 


184 


632 93 










31 














3? 


do Savings Bank. 

do Upper Canada 
BankBuilding 

Totals 


















33 






160 


241 30 


184 


77 50 


200 
202 


45 45 


















38,918 71 


63,731 01 




63,955 08 




72,169 82 




85,470 4 



MA> 



1 


Winnipeg Assistant 
Receiver-Gen- 
eral's Office... 






















? 


do Custom House. 

do Finance Office. 

do Fort Osborne 

Barracks 






















3 






















4 






















5 


do Immigrant Sta- 
tion 






















€ 


do Lt. -Governor's 
Residence 






















7 


do Provost Prison. 
Totals 

























































































30 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1SS3 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 



Continued. 

Concluded. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


9) 

| 


II. 


$ cts. 
150,313 93 


II. 

18* 

188 


$ cts. 
190,560 49 

5,000 00 
553 15 


II. 

232 
232 


$ cts. 
204,912 83 

5,000 00 
877 15 


n, 

266 
266 

264 


$ cts. 
184,721 95 

5,000 00 
525 00 

500 00 


II. 

25 

253 


$ cts. 
209,300 43 

5,000 00 
475 00 


$ cts. 
1,260,468 12 

20,000 00 
3,430 30 

500 00 

2.538 98 
196 75 
267 55 

1,773 43 

25,067 23 

2,122 39 

838 95 

1,032 93 

59 (9 
253 00 

364 25 


•>o 


155 


450 00 


21 

9 9 


151 

149 
154 


1,598 73 
977 18 














23 














250 


196 75 


24 
25 






250 


423 72 


26 


186 


4,925 51 


223 
'236 


14,009 60 
""469 45 


225 
263 


6,132 12 


2 7 






251 
251 


2,122 39 
369 50 


28 
99 














'■! 1 


















250 


253 00 


31 


















1 


r< 









153,339 84 




201,039 15 


225,269 03 


196,879 07 




218,140 79 


1,318,912 97 





TOBA. 






















II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 
265 


600 00 


II. 

253 

253 

253 


600 00 
1,422 16 

2,756 50 


1,200 00 

1,422 16 

778 08 

2,756 50 

41 27 

22,125 19 
305 18 


1 














•> 










237 


778 08 






•-; 










4 






187 

163 

187 


41 27 
9,808 25 


237 


10,316 94 






5 


155 


2,000 00 


6 


265 


305 18 






7 








2,000 00 




9,849 52 




11,095 02 




905 18 




4,778 66 


28,628 38 














1 


a 













4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1883' 



Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

EEPAIES— I 

NORTH-WEST^ 



Name 

of 
Work. 



Battleford Buildings 



Year ended ji 



1868. 



$ cts. 



$ eta. 



1870. 



$ cts. 



1871. 



$ cts. 



1872. 

$ cts. I 



BRITISH 



SH 



1 


New Westminster 
Custom House 

do Post Office 


















II. 
371 


175 00 























3 


do Public Build- 
























A 


do Marine Hospiial 
do Post Office Sav- 
ing Bank 
























5 
























6 


do Public Build- 
ings 


























Totals 






































175 «■ 





Abstract Statement of Expenditure or 



I 
? 


Nova Scotia 

P. E. Island 






















14,094 3i 


3 


New Brunswick 




















10,495 1 
11,599 5 
85,470 4 


4 


Quebec 




8,404 89 
38,918 71 




4,696 23 
63,731 01 




9,420 43 
63,955 08 




4,174 83 
72,169 82 




5 


Ontario 




fl 


Manitoba 




7 


N.-W. Territories ... 






















H 


British Columbia ... 




















175 


9 


Generallv 






















Totals 
























47,323 60 




68,427 24 




73,375 51 




76,344 65 




121,834 C 



32 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 

Concluded. 
TERRITORIES. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years 

to 30th 
June. 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


a 


$ cts. 


II. 1 $ cts. 
1871 100 00 


% cts. 
1 




$ cts. 


% cts 


$ cts. 
100 00 


1 


' 


1 











COLUMBIA. 



II. 




II. 




II. 
236 


6S9 50 


II. 




II. 




844 50 
75 00 

225 00 

24 00 

2,138 15 

2,099 38 


1 






187 
187 


75 00 
225 00 










3 


















s 






236 
230 


24 00 
2,036 15 


265 








4 










102 00 






*, 


155 


535 86 






253 


1,564 02 


6 




535 86 




300 00 


2,729 65 




102 00 




1,564 02 


5,406 53 





PUBLIC BUILDINGS— Repairs, &c. 



7,702 41 



3,853 58 

19,734 06 

153,339 84 

2,000 00 



535 86 
655 00 



187,820 75 






10 a— 3 



4,693 90 

200 00 

5,217 78 

38.388 56 

201,039 15 

9,849 52 

100 00 

300 00 



259,788 91 



9,088 10 
2,920 89 
5,186 25 

20,910 64 
225,269 03 

11,095 02 



2,729 65 



277,199 58 



9,481 84 
1,341 10 

5,904 34 

28,408 66 

196,879 07 

905 18 



102 00 



243,022 19 



33 



2,114 38 
5,464 89 
2,225 13 
11,959 67 
218,140 79 
4,778 66 



1,564 02 



246,247 54 



47,175 01 


9,926 88 


32,882 23 


157,697 55 


1,318,912 97 


28,628 38 


100 00 


5,406 53 


655 00 


1,601,384 55 



!G Victoria, 




Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 




1 
1 

A. 1SS3 ' 


Yearly Expenditure on HAKBOURS and! 

nova! 




Name 
of 

Work. 


Year ended I 


g 

5 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 

2 
3 

4 
5 

g 






$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. H 


Big Pond C B 














































































































7 
























8 

9 

10 
























Cow Bay 






















11 








155 


2,920 00 










251 


1,650 06 ji 


12 


Gabarus, C B 














13 
























14 

























15 

























16 

























17 
























18 
























19 
20 


Lingan 

Liverpool(Brooklyn) 


















251 

250 


55"2« 
8,029 3« 


21 


















22 





















OT 
























24 




















251 


1,650 MM 


25 
26 


Meteghan Cove 


















27 


Musquodoboit 

McNair's Cove 


















25 i 


23 7. 


29 


Oak Point (known 


















30 

31 
32 
33 

34 


Oyster Pond, Che- 
dabucto Bay 

Pictou Island 

Plympton 

Porsper'sPond ; Che- 
dabucto Bay 

Port George , 






















r 15 


do Greville 






















36 
37 

38 


do Hood 

do Medway 

do William (now 

Port Lome). 

Saulnierville 


















251 


750 0»j 


3 f ( 






















40 


Tancook Island, Ma- 
boney Bay 






















41 
4? 


Trout Cove 

Tusket Island ... 






















43 


Yarmouth 
























Totals 






























2,920 00 












12,158 SJfti 
































34 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



BEEAKWATEES for the undermentioned years. 

SCOTIA. 



30th June . 


















Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


a 


II. 

141 


$ cts. 
2,283 00 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

2,283 00 
2,5C0 00 
13,564 37 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 
2,338 88 
2,750 00 
2,000 00 

90,120 04 

2,000 00 

7,070 00 

2.000 00 

2,500 00 

2,000 00 

84,397 20 

10,000 00 

22,568 79 

10,325 50 

2,000 00 

58,320 77 

83,440 15 

6,341 99 
3,000 00 
8,650 00 

10,000 00 
3,000 00 
1,000 00 

28,564 45 

24,045 70 
2,000 00 


1 


194 
196 


2,000 00 
6,000 00 


244 

242 


500 00 
6,690 67 










*> 






257 


873 70 


S 






272 


3,000 00 


4 






195 
193 


2,000 00 
338 88 










5 


141 


2,000 00 














fi 










257 


2,750 00 


7 














273 

271 
273 


2,000 00 

46,458 95 
2,000 00 


8 






176 
193 

194 
194 
194 

"l93 
193 


10,004 96 

"T,50()"()0 
2,000 00 
2,500 00 

'"s'jVir'oo 

10,000 00 


244 


25,000 00 


256 


8.656 13 


9 






10 






11 
















1? 


141 


""if 50 


n 


"244 


""35,891 10 


272 
271 


2.000 00 
17,926 00 






14 


257 


24,851 60 


15 
16 






243 


5,103 79 


271 

272 


17,465 00 
97 21 


"257 
257 


"*10*228 29 

2,000 00 


17 




1 




18 




::;;;::..: :.. 








19 


140 
140 

140 


9,417 50 
39,401 86 

3,000 00 


192 
192 

195 


22,016 25 
22,078 50 

1,000 00 


243 
243 


17,897 80 
2,092 25 


271 
271 

285 

272 
272 
271 


8,933 96 
10,088 16 

3,000 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 


00 


259 


1,750 00 


21 

22 
?3 


















04 






244 


5,000 00 






?5 






195 


3,000 60 


256 
259 


1,000 00 
115 50 


?fi 






27 


220 


3,003 00 


192 

193 

"194 
193 

194 
193 

176 
193 
194 


1,000 00 


243 


5,042 70 


277 

271 
272 


3,815 10 

15,000 00 
2,000 00 


28 
09 






30 






31 






2,343 97 

5,000 00 
2,000 00 

6,020 50 


244 

248 

244 

256 


1,200 00 

119 09 
5,000 00 

4 50 










3,543 97 

5,119 09 
7,000 00 

6,028 00 

16.469 81 

4,'513 50 

3.500 00 
2,000 00 

2,000 00 

4,000 00 

500 00 

13,417 79 


32 














33 














34 






285 


3 00 






35 






259 


964 81 


36 


243 



4,513 50 






37 


141 


2,000 00 


19c 


1,500 00 


273 








38 
39 


















40 










271 
251 
276 


4,000 0C 
500 0C 
314 54 







41 


14 


5,771 2£ 


"iS 


I ""6,'332'OC 


244 


ijooo'oc 


42 







43 








.... 


95,749 21 




124,852 06 




121,121 OS 





151,822 25 




53,250 0c 


t 561,873 0C 





10 a— 3J- 



* 2,000 refunded. 
35 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188a 



Yearly Expenditure on HAKBOURS and 

PRINCE EDW 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 




1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


Colville Bay(Souris! 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


? 


New London 






















S 


Tignish 
























Totals 













































1 


Bathurst 














I. 




II. 







Campo Bello 






















3 


Dipper Harbour 






















4 


Grande Anse, Baie 
des Chaleurs 






















5 


Herring Cove 






















6 


Hillsboro', River 
Petitcodiac 






















7 


Miramichi Tug Ser- 
vice 






















8 


Pointe du Chene, 
Shediac 






















9 


Quaco, Bay of 
tfundy 


















251 


12 5J 


10 


Richibucto 


















11 


do Tug Service.... 














195 


4,000 00 


251 


2,000 OJJ 


12 


Sackville 














13 


Shippegan 






















14 


St. John Harbour . . 






















15 


Tynemouth 
























Totals 




















2,012 1 


















4,000 00 






























36 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



BREAKWATERS for the undermentioned years— Continued. 

ARD ISLAND. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 3Cth 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


- 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


II. 
245 

245 

245 


$ cts. 
8 00 

3,810 60 

2,010 60 


II. 
273 

273 

273 


$ cts. 
20,000 00 

503 50 

4,557 50 


II. 

257 

259 
257 


$ cts. 
19,871 33 

500 00 

4,750 00 


% cts. 
39,879 33 

4,814 10 

11,318 10 


i 

2 
g 





















5,829 20 




25,061 00 




25,121 33 


56,011 53 

















BRUNSWICK. 



II. 




II. 




II. 
241 


3,876 43 


II. 




II. 




3,876 43 
1,600 00 


I 






195 


1,000 00 
10 000 00 


270 


600 00 













195 


241 


11,960 72 


269 


279 00 






22,239 72 


3 












270 


3,000 00 


259 


998 98 


3,998 98 


4 


142 


9 70 


195 


13,100 00 


242 


3 75 










13,113 45 


5 






196 


1,500 00 
2,000 00 


241 


1,500 00 










3,000 00 


fi 


142 


2,000 00 


148 














4,000 00 


7 






241 


7,354 87 


269 


7,228 37 






14,583 24 


8 


14? 


18,865 25 
1,125 70 
















18,877 84 


9 


142 


195 


5,956 75 


241 


15,936 50 


270 


10,853 4? 


255 


1,621 44 


35,493 81 


10 


• i? 


2 000 00 


148 


2,500 00 


179 


2,500 00 

900 00 
16 50 

12,033 70 
2,500 00 










13,000 00 


11 








248 
249 

242 

242 










900 00 
15,464 93 

145,869 36 


12 










270 
270 


6,312 80 
64,335 66 


256 
256 


9,135 63 

65,000 00 


13 






175 

195 


4,500 00 


14 










242 








2,500 00 


15 






















21,000 65 




40,556 75 




58,582 47 




92,609 25 




76,756 05 


298,517 76 





37 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188^ 



Yearly Expenditure on HARBOURS and 

QUE. 



Name 

of 
Work. 



Amherst Pier. 



Bagotvilie Pier. 
River Saguenay. .. 



Baie St. Paul Pier. 
Berthier Pier 



Chicoutimi River, 
Saguenay Pier.... 



Coteau Landing 
Pier 



TiEboulements Pier, 
8 House Harbour 



L 'Islet Pier. 



Mooring Piers, La- 
chine Rapids... 



Year ended 



1868. 



210 



Malbaie Pier. 



Piers below Quebec 
Generally 



Quebec Harbour 
(Survey River St. 
Charles) 



Rimouski Pier.... 

Riviere Blanche Pier 

do du Loup do . 

do Ouelle or 
Pointe a u x 
Orignaux 



Sault au Recollet 
Piers and Booms. 
{See Slides and 
Booms, folio — .) 



Totals 



210 



$ cts 



III. 

43 



4 00 



23 50 



50 00 



1869. 



243 



$ cts. 



11 90 



1870. 



I. 

180 



297 



297 



297 



297 



77 50 



11 90 



38 



297 



297 



$ cts. 
600 00 



470 80 



1,192 00 



1,162 83 



344 00 



90 00 



100 00 



3,959 63 



1871. 



I. 
195 



285 



194 
195 



194 
285 



194 
285 



278 



194 
285 



284 
285 



194 

285 



285 



194 

284 



$ cts. 
1,750 87 



415 00 



3,295 41 
2,392 50 



950 00 

860 95 

1,291 00 

890 01 



700 00 



320 00 



410 00 



13,275 74 



1872. 



II. 

250 



250 



336 
253 



337 



337 



$ cts. 

2,427 68 !j 



39 44 



24 50 
131 00 



537 00 



66 



3,276 21 



10 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



BREAKWATERS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

BEC. 



Wth June. 



187c 



II. 

14a 



$ cts. 
4,783 62 



40 



220 



1874. 



II. 
191 



6,242 03 
337 00 



200 00 
210 10 



200 00 



192 
203 

191 

196 



$ cts 
4,721 03 



196 
203 



203 
203 



203 



203 



203 



122 19 
15 00 

!,000 00 

274 00 



1875. 



II. 



241 



240 
341 



291 60 
159 00 



465 00 
427 30 



1.035 00 



214 00 



2.899 00 



256 



256 



$ cts, 



7,085 13 



2,065 35 
1,603 00 



1876. 



268 
269 
283 

269 

277 
283 



268 



$ cts 



3,084 34 



18,413 7: 



1877. 



II. 



1,976 40 



269 

283 10,007 27 



1,289 85 



50 00 



11,972 76 18,623 12 12,093 33 55,719 60 



269 
283 



283 



276 



269 



14,021 04 
885 17 

6,458 02 



265 



265 



265 



873 65 



255 
265 

255 



$ cts 



3,938 1 



2,821 19 



141 80 



Total for 


Ten Years, 


to 30th 


June, 1877. 



1,080 16 
909 30 

1,213 78 



$ cts. 
14,283 21 

3,084 34 



25,621 03 3 

4 



4 ; 372 17 

10,041 75 

11,453 88 

13,207 57 
2,291 60 

6.412 04 

860 95 

16,143 34 

3,829 91 

6,458 02 

2,616 00 
1,953 81 
1,861 86 

4,622 78 



10,104 40 129,114 26 



5 

6 

7 
3 

9 

10 
II 
12 

13 

14 
15 
16 

17 



39 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18S3 



Yearly Expenditure on HAEBOURS and 

ONTA 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


o 

a 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


Bayfield, Lake Hu- 


III. 


$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ ct3. : 


2 
3 


Bay of Quinte — 

Belleville 

Picton 






















4 


Chantry Island, 














195 


6,326 35 


250 


28,176 46 


5 


Cobourg, Lake On- 
tario 














6 


Collingwood, Geor- 
gian Bay 






















7 


Colpoy's Range, Big 
Bay , 






















8 


Goderich, Lake Hu- 
ron 


















249 


69,344 & 


9 


Inverhuron, Lake 
Huron 


















10 


Kincardine, Lake 
Huron 


43 


4,500 00 










195 


1,000 00 


250 


6,139 tB 


11 


Kingston, Lake On- 
tario 










12 
13 


Meaford, Georgian 
Bay 

Oakville, Lake On- 
tario 


















253 
337 


140 m 


14 


Owen Sound, Geor- 
gian Bay 


















15 


Oshawa, Lake On- 
tario 






















16 


Port Albert, Lake 
Huron 






















17 


Port Burwell, Lake 
Erie 






















18 
19 


Port Darlington, 
Lake Ontario 

Port Dover, Lake 
Erie 


43 


573 05 


243- 


1,210 45 






284 


875 00 






20 


Port Hope, Lake 
Ontario 










21 


Port Stanley, Lake 
Erie 
























Carried forward... 


























5,073 05 




1,210 45 








8,201 35 




103,801 4 




- 







(«) $10,000.00 paid by Municipality of Stanley. 

(6) 25,507.49 do Cobourg Harbour Trust Commissioners. 

(c) 15,505.00 do Northern Railway. 



40 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



BREAKWATERS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

RIO. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 




II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 
239 

246 
240 

239 
239 
237 


$ cts. 
1,917 98 

1,962 60 
6.000 00 

61,261 64 

15,861 68 

(d) 
13,030 77 


II. 
267 


$ cts. 
18,398 13 


II. 

254 

258 


$ cts. 

(a) 

34,205 87 


$ cts. 
0) 

54,521 98 

11,962 60 
6,000 00 

235,461 29 

73,036 32 

(c) and (d) 

57,468 43 

40C 00 

00 

467,396 10 
6,093 60 

48,458 64 
14,814 40 

(/) 

22,899 19 

588 20 

10,367 55 
5,000 00 
6,000 00 

8,595 97 
5,000 00 
2,658 50 
25,318 55 
8,158 00 


1 






191 


10,000 00 


q 














3 


139 


32,208 49 


190 
191 
190 


29,768 25 

203 66 

(c) 
44,437 66 


268 
266 


41,624 98 
23,403 08 


255 
254 


36,095 12 
33,567 90 


4 






6 










259 
255 


400 00 

86,175 10 




139 


104,738 98 


190 

191 

190 
196 


30,426 11 
1,000 00 

5,069 70 


239 
238 

238 
240 

238 

238 
238 


(e) 
49,510 97 

5,093 60 

3,674 61 
4,407 56 

(/) 

18,502 88 

3,740 89 
6,000 00 


268 


127,200 44 


8 
q 


139 
143 

139 


2,629 94 
4,139 70 


267 
275 

266 

267 

275 

268 


14,930 13 
6,267 14 


254 


10,514 56 


10 
11 


191 


4,396 31 






13 


139 


447 46 


6,626 66 
5,000 00 






13 

H 














1 F > 






16 










267 

268 

267 


3,422 22 
5,000 00 


254 


5,173 75 


IT 














IS 


















19 










239 
239 


6,945 93 
31 64 


267 
267 


14,372 62 
4,732 05 


259 
254 


4,000 00 
3,394 31 


20 
23 


~ 










144,164 57 




125,301 69 




197,942 75 




270,977 45 





213,526 61 


1,070,199 32 






(<0 $12 

(O io 
(/) io 


,763. 

,000. 
,000. 


26 paid by 
00 do 
00 do 


Nortl 
Towi 
Muni 


lern Railway, 
tship of Godei 
cipality of St. 


*ich. 
Vine 

41 


ent. 











1 


G Victoria. 




Sessional Papers ( 


No. 10. 


) 




A. 1S83 

1 


Yearly Expenditure on HARBOURS and! 

, ONTARIO— 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended j 
1 


— 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 

1 




Brought forward. 

Presqu'Isle, Geor- 
gian Bav 


III. 


$ cts. 
5,073 05 


I. 

244 


$ cts. 
1,210 45 

300 00 


I. 


$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 
8,201 35 


II. 

281 

250 


$ cts. 
103,801 4(1 

68 4.'i 

64,164 ll 


22 


298 


75 00 




73 


Rondeau, Lake Erie 

Saugeen (or South- 
ampton) 










24 


43 


3,500 00 










199 


2,506 00 


25 


Shannonville, Lake 
Ontario 














26 


Thunder Bay, Lake 
Superior 




















J 


27 


Toronto, Lake On- 
























Totals 
























8,573 05 


1,510 45 




75 00 




10,701 35 




168,033(1 



Abstract Statement of Expenditui j 



1 


Nova Scotia 








2,920 00 












12,158 


fl 


P. E. Island 








3 


New Brunswick 
















4,000 00, 
13,275 74 
10,701 35 




2,01| j 

3,27^ ; 

168,033 j 


4 






77 50 
8,573 05 




11 90 
1,510 45 




3,959 63 
75 00 




f> 


Ontario 






Totals 






8,650 55 




4,442 35 




4,034 63 




27,977 09 




j 
185,481 1 



42 






46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



BREAKWATERS for the undermentioned years- 

Concluded. 


—Concluded. 






30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


o 

E 
5z; 


II. 

139 
139 


$ cts. 
144,164 57 

6,859 30 

60,163 50 


II. 

190 
190 


$ cts. 
125,301 69 

9,282 00 

28,053 06 


II. 

240 
248 

239 


% cts. 
197,942 75 

10,365 39 

30,965 08 


II. 


% cts. 
270,977 45 


II. 


$ cts. 
213,526 61 


$ cts. 
1,070,199 32 

26,950 12 

183,345 80 

6,000 00 

2,992 94 

(a) 

5,999 25 

20,919 05 


22" 
23- 
2d 











240 


2,992 94 










25 






255 
255 


5,999 25 
17,075 03 


26 










240 


1,019 05 


268 


2,824 97 


27 














211,187 37 


162,636 75 




243,285 21 




273,802 42 




236,600 89 


1,316,406 48 




on 


HARBO 


UR 


S and I 


IRE 


AKWATJ 


ERS 


;. 













95,749 21 




124,852 06 




121,121 09 

5,829 20 

58,582 47 

12,093 33 

243,285 21 




151,822 22 
25,061 00 
92,609 25 
55,719 60 

273,802 42 




53,250 03 
25,121 33 
76,756 05 
10,104 40 
236,600 89 


561,873 00 

56,011 53 

298,517 76 

129,114 26 

1,316,406 48 


1 




24,000 65 
11,972 76 
211,187 37 




40,556 75 
18,623 12 
162,636 75 




3 
4 
5 


.... 


342,909 99 




346,668 68 




440,911 30 




599,014 49 


401,832 70 


2,361,923 03 






(a) Furth 


er ex 


penditure ii 


icluc 


ed in Pacific 


Raih 


ray. 











43 



46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. lSSS; 


Yearly Expenditure on IMPROVEMENTS ol 

noyj! 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year endedji 


1 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1 


East River, Pictou. 
*Meteghan River.... 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cti 


■> 






















3 


*Salmon do .... 






















4 


Sissiboo do 
























Totals 



































































i 




















II. 




?! 


Petitcodiac do ... 






















3 


St. John do ... 


















252 


1,368 ) . 




Totals 






































1,368 \% 














































Ol 

























vt<- 


1 


Cap de Chatte River 

Chateauguay do . 

Gatineau do . 

Ottawa River (pro- 
portion of expen- 
ture) 


















II. 
250 


792 


7 




















3 






















4 






















5 


Richelieu River 






















6 


Riviere alaGraisse, 
Rigaud 






















7 


Riviere du Loup {en 
haut) 




















' 


8 


St. Lawrence — 
Removal of Rock 
Cap a la Roche 

Dredging at 
Contreeoeur ... 






















9 






















10 

11 


Removal of 
Chains and 
Anchors 

St. Francis River... 
























- Totals 








































791' 


























* These should a 


ppeai 


• in u Harbc 


>urs,' 


'folio 34. 
44 















46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



RIVERS for the undermentioned years. 

SCOTIA. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


§ 


II. 


$ cts 


II. 


$ Ct3. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 
251 


% cts. 
342 73 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

342 73 
4,500 00 
2,656 03 
2,500 00 


1 


ill 


4,500 00 














fl 




193 


2,656 03 


"243 


"T, 500 00 











3 

A 
















4,500 00 


2.656 03 


2,500 00 




342 73 






9,998 76 













BRUNSWICK. 



4,000 00 
2,270 43 



6,270 43 



195 

171 



7,242 00 
7,480 35 



14,722 35 



242 
220 



1,194 00 
10,478 28 



11,672 28 



251 
251 



2,955 48 



3,332 80 
6,288 28 



240 



55 00 
55 00 



2,955 48 
12,436 00 
21,985 46 



40,376 94 



BEC. 



II. 




II. 




11. 




II. 




II. 




793 20 

3,283 79 

38,137 82 

2,559 37 
31,186 31 

527 62 

2,000 00 

17,000 00 
13,752 37 

49,039 52 
14,218 51 


1 














274 


1,680 80 


258 


1,602 99 


2 






196 


15,916 32 


245 


22,221 50 


a 






251 
275 

251 


2,559 37 
3,988 21 






4 
5 

6 


144 


1,620 00 


170 
196 
191 

170 
196 

171 


3,332 27 

527 62 

.1.000 00 

5,000 00 
13,752 37 

31 20 


220 


21,119 96 


240 


4.125 87 


139 
144 


1,000 00 
12,000 00 














8 





















220 
246 


25,000 00 
5,365 00 


251 

274 


12,008 32 
8,853 51 


249 


12,000 00 


10 

11 




















14,620 00 




39,559 78 




73,706 46 




29,090 21 




17,728 86 


175,497 51 
















45 













46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1883. 



Yeably Expenditure on IMPEOVEMENTS of 

onta! 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended If 


03 

s 


1868. 


1869. 




1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


I 






% cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts 


2 
























3 


Neebish Rapids, St. 






















/\ 
















198 


149 15 


251 


825 1H 


5 
















6 




















7 


Thames do 

Totals 














198 


(a) 
4,834,04 




825 . 


















4,983 19 
























ma: 


1 


Red River 






























Fraser River 





































Abstract Statement of Expenditure 



Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick.. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

British Columbia. 



Totals. 



4,983 19 



4,983 19 



1,368) 
792| 

82* 



(a) Including $2,000.00 paid by the Counties of Kent and Lambton. 
46 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



RIVERS for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 

RIO. 



IMPROVEMENTS of RIVERS. 



■ ' 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


II. 

220 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


9i 

g 

25 


D. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
200 00 


II. 1 
251 

251 


$ cts. 

7,060 32 

(b) 

12,527 39 


II. 1 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

7,260 32 
(6) 
17,527 12 

9,601 92 

5,368 53 
825 10 

8,265 16 

(a) 
15,156 12 


1 






191 


4,999 73 






9 










240 


9,601 92 


3 










245 


2,660 00 


251 
275 


2,559 38 


,| 






c » 










247 


8,133 02 


275 
275 


132 14 
1,503 75 






fi 


144 
220 


7,260 11 


171 


1,558 22 


















7,260 11 





6,557 95 




10,993 02 




23,782 98 




9,601 92 


64,004 27 


1 


TOBA. 


144 


1,350 00 


171 


3,684 90 


220 


200 00 










5,234 90 


1 


(COLUMBIA. 


144 


3,299 73 


171 


839 25 


220 


5,739 08 


251 


1,621 63 






11,499 68 


1 









4,500 00 
6,270 43 
14,620 00 
7,260 11 
1,350 00 
3,299 73 




2,656 03 

14,722 35 

39,559 78 

6,557 95 

3,684 90 

839 25 




37,300 27 




68,020 26! 

J 

1 



2,500 00 

11,672 28 

73,706 46 

10,993 02 

200 00 

5,739 08 



104,810 84 



342 73 

6,288 28 

29,090 21 

23,782 98 



1,621 63 
61,125 83 



55 00 

17,728 86 

9,601 92 



27,385 78 



9,998 76 

40,376 91 

175,497 51 

64,004 27 

5,234 90 

11,499 69 



306,612 07 



(6) Including $5,00© paid by the Municipalities of Napanee, Lennox and Addington. 

47 



4G Victoria. 




Sess 


Lonal Papei 


s (No. 10. 


) 




A. 1883 | 


1 
Yearly Expenditure on DREDGES 

COXSTEud 

NOVA SCOTIA ANdI j 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended fl 


s 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


''t- 
is 72. 


1 


"New Dominion ' '. 
" Canada" 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


I. 

181 


$ cts. 
8,873 67 


I. 

195 

196 

196 


$ cts. 

11,846 43 
13,237 33 


II. 


$ ctsfl 


9 










251 


13,778 6*| 





" St. Lawrence " ... 














4 


" Cape Breton " .... 






















R 


Tu^s 
























Totals 
































8,873 67 




25,083 76 




13,778 6H 







































PRINCE EI 




] 


"Prince Edward". 
















































ONT 




1 


"Challenge" 
























2 


Tug "C.W. Jones" 
or " Trudeau " ... 

Totals 









































































BRITIS 




1 


























2 


Tug " George" .... 


























Totals 






















I " 
















































I 









































Abstract Statement of Expe 


1 














» 

4,436 83 


12,541 88 
12,541 88 




6,889 , 
6,889 j 


2 














1 

4,436 84 


3 


P "R Tslnnd 
















4 
























5 


























Totals 


































8,873 67 




25,083 76 




13,778 1 






















4* 















4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1S83 



'or the undermentioned years. 

nox. 

tfEW BRUNSWICK. 



i'SOtb June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 




1877. 


a 


II. 

143 
143 


$ cts. 

3,995 92 
13,717 28 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 

258 
258 


$ cts. 

2,960 49 

182 50 


$ Ct3. 

27,676 51 

41,300 19 

114,911 23 

17,884 38 

350 50 


1 










274 

274 
'274 


384 46 

18,443 67 

520 00 

350 50 


2 


197 
197 


31,795 54 
11,094 00 


245 

245 


61,672 02 
6,270 38 


3 






4 






















.... 


17,713 20J 


42,889 54 


70,942 40 




19,698 63 




3,142 99 


202,122 81 




fARD ISLAND. 










245 


23,582 07 










23,582 07 


1 












10. 


43 


19,350 00 


197 


10,584 32 


245 


1,277 00 


274 








31,211 32 
6,847 05 


1 


6,847 05 






? 




















... 


19,350 00 




10,584 32 




1,277 00 




6,847 05 






38,058 37 










OLUMBIA. 










245 
245 


1,447 96 
6,250 00 










1,447 96 
6,250 00 


1 


















2 




















... 










7,697 96 








7,697 96 















; 



ture on DKEDGES— Construction. 



8,856 60 
8,856 60 



19,350 00 



37,063 20 



10 a-4 



21,444 77 
21,444 77 



10,534 32 



53,473 



35,471 20 

35,471 20 

23,582 07 

1,277 00 

7,697 96 



103,499 43 



9,849 32 



9,849 31 



6,847 05 



26,545 68 



1,571 49 
1,571 50 



3,142 99 



101,061 41 

101,061 41 

23,582 07 

38,058 37 

7,697 96 



271,461 21 



4U 






4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1S83 



Expenditure on DREDGING 



Name 

of 
Work. 



Nova Scotia , 
P. E. Island, 



New Brunswick. 



Quebec 



Ontario 

British Columbia 
Totals ... 



Year ended 



1863. 



I. 

117 

III. 

43 

I. 

117 
III. 

42 



$ cts. 



3,975 10 



2,852 62 



6,827 72 



1869. 



$ cts. 



1870. 



$ cts. 



1871. 



I. $ cts. 



195 
199 



1,788 98 



1.788,98 



1872. 



II. $ cts. 



251 



7,356 40 



603 67 



7,960 07 



Yearly Expenditure on 
CONSTEUl 

QUE 






St. Maurice District 
Works 

Ottawa River (pro- 
portion of ex- 
penditure) 

Gatineau River 



Coulonge River 

Black River 

Riviere du Moine ... 
7 Riviere des Prairies 
(removal of ob- 
struction, &c). 
do Sault au Recol- 
letPier 



Totals 



117 



III. 

42 



2,000 00 



18 00 



2,018 00 



154 



1,621 80 



1,621 80 



185 



300 00 



300 00 



198 
199 



198 



198 
199 



140 76 



2,500 00 



1,121 16 
19 88 



3,781 80 



II. 

251 



251 

252 



37,691 90 



18,410 4 

1,085 2! 
6,263 18 



63,450 8( 



ONT, 



1 


Ottawa River (pro- 
portion of exp.).. 
Madawaska River. . 


117 


2,000 00 


154 


1,621 80 














? 










251 


1,350 (X 


3 


Petewawa do ... 


















A 


Newcastle Works... 
Totals 


I. 

116 

III. 

42 


380 85 








































2,380 85 




1,621 80 












1,350 0| 



50 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years. 














30th June. 


Total for 

Ten Years, 

to 30th 


















0/ 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 




1876. 




1877. 


June, 1877. 




|, 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 




142 


9,079 72 


196 


6,288 03 


246 


9,044 38 


275 


21,985 12 


258 


34,846 74 


81,243 99 


1 










246 

246 


8,290 85 
15,525 13 


275 
275 


10,891 80 
16,911 30 


258 
258 


12,758 27 
23,160 90 


31,940 92 
91,488 10 


ft 


142 


12,812 43 


196 


13,932 96 


3 


142 
143 


4,123 49 


196 


7,715 46 




See ' 'Rivers' ' 


275 


170 93 


258 


585 90 


16.570 88 


4 


143 


200 00 


196 


8,453 89 


245 
246 


2,213 22 


275 


1,151 08 


258 


7,388 07 


22,258 88 


5 


143 


12,964 88 


197 


8,036 23 


247 


16,868 17 


276 


17,731 52 


258 


566 62 


56,771 09 


6 


.... 


39,180 52 




44,426 57 




51,941 75 




68,841 75 




79,3C6 50 


300,273 86 




]V 


IDES an 


d I 


SOOMS. 



















PION. 

:E0. 






















11. 

143 

143 
156 


33,597 30 
11,392 11 


II. 
189 

189 
189 


31,500 00 

8,349 18 
28,716 94 


II. 

248 


17,497 18 


11. 
274 


25,436 20 


II. 1 


145,863 34 

23,423 09 
28,716 94 

318 00 

2,500 00 

19,478 54 

3,037 35 
10,466 48 


1 


258 


60 00 


71 










3 


















4 


156 
156 


* 1*068 i"6 

333 35 

1,263 68 


189 


497 56 


247 


2,917 34 


273 


2 40 






5 
6 

7 

8 














47,654 54 




69,063 68 




20,414 52 


25,438 60 




60 00 


233,803 74 





10 
























43 
56 


11,392 11 


189 


8,349 18 










258 


60 00 


23,423 09 
1,350 00 
7,713 00 

5,043 20 


1 












*> 






189 
189 


7,713 00 
4,090 00 














3 




247 


572 35 










4 


i 














11,392 11 




20,152 18 




572 35 






60 00 


37,529 29 













10a-4£ 



51 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Abstract Statement of Expenditure on SLIDES and 





Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


03 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


i 


Quebec 




% cts. 
2,018 00 

2,380 85 




% cts. 
1,621 80 

1,621 80 




$ cts. 
300 00 




% cts. 
3,781 80 




% cts. 
63,450 80 

1,350 00 


7 








Totals 


















4,398 85 




3,243 60 




300 00 




3,781 80 


61,800 80 









Yeaely Expenditure on 

STAFF and) 

QUE 



1 

2 
g 


Saguenay District 
Works— Staff 

do Repairs... 

do Collection 

Totals... 

St. Maurice District 
Works— Staff 

do Repairs.... 

do Collection 

Totals... 

Ottawa District 
Works— Staff (pro- 
portion of expen- 
diture) 

Ottawa District 
Works — Repairs - 

Ottawa River... 
Gatineau River 

Coulonge River 
Carried forward. . 


I. 

208 

III. 

66 

209 

III. 

66 


833 16 
3,297 01 


I. 
241 

241 


712 05 
165 35 


I. 

296 

296 


690 80 

119 20 


I. 

283 

283 


752 39 
83 90 


II. 

335 

336 


691 05-1 
818 23,' | 




I. 

208 

III. 

66 

I. 

208 
















— — — 






4,135 17 




877 40 




810 00 


836 29 


1,509 33JI 


4 
5 

e> 


9,914 15 
6351 81 


201 

201 


9,668 61 
3,258 51 


295 

296 
296 


9,166 67 

7,258 72 
577 40 


283 

283 
283 


11,489 30 

5,183 99 
382 51 


335 
336 


12,311 53j|l 

5,522 19JJJ 
398 33|J 
















I. 

209 

III. 

65 

I. 

207 

III. 

65 

I. 

207 

I. 

207 

III. 

65 


16,265 96 




12,927 15 

7,209 85 

4,212 19 
959 81 

915 19 


294 

294 
295 

295 
295 


17,002 79 




17,055 80 




18,232 OSJl, 


7 

8 
9 

10 


6,995 82 

12,812 64 
496 45 

1,302 61 


240 

240 
241 

240 
241 


7,965 60 

4,900 26 
177 45 

238 75 


282 

283 
283 

283 


8,592 50 

2,641 33 
384 68 

1,543 80 


335 

335 
335 

335 


7,601 9<||, 

6,459 3<J 

503 4! I 

2,408 5<j 







11,607 52 




13,297 04 




13,282 06 




13,162 31 




16,973 2|; 



hi 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



BOOMS— Construction, for the undermentioned years. 



30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


£2 

§ 




$ cts. 
47,654 54 

11,392 11 




$ cts. 
69,063 68 

20,152 18 




$ cts. 
20,414 52 

572 35 




$ cts. 
25,438 60 




$ cts. 
60 00 

60 00 


$ cts. 
233,803 74 

37,529 29 


i 

2 















59,046 65 




89,215 86 




20,988 87 




25,438 60 




120 00 


271,333 03 





SLIDES and BOOMS. 
KEPAIES, &o. 

BEC. 



II. 
221 

221 



221 

221 
222 



221 

221 
335 



634 05 



541 50 204 



204 



1,225 55 



16,356 60 

7,092 48 
428 00 



23,877 03 



7,147 79 

3,607 81 
836 72 

430 74 



12,023 06 



204 

204 
204 



203 



203 
204 



684 0- 



3,455 44 



4,139 47 



II. 

258 



258 



17,767 31 

9,560 48 
443 60 



27,771 39 



10,893 49 

4,088 95 
703 90 

778 79 



16,465 13 



932 80 



1,372 81 



2,305 61 



257 17,851 96 



257 
258 



256 

256 
257 

257 



9,036 51 
571 60 



27,460 07 



10,913 35 



16,532 43 283 
16,383 691 283 



II. 

284 

284 

284 



284 

284 

284 



283 



2,369 89 



46,199 36 



283 



716 05 



4,025 20 



400 23 



5,141 48 



18,251 84 265 



II. 
266 



266 



4,490 87 
568 00 



23,310 71 



10,052 40 

3,044 88 
1,108 84 

2,455 81 



16,661 93 



265 
267 



741 05 



518 08 



1,259 13 



13,675 26 

5,892 27 
618 00 



265 

265 
265 

265 



20,185 53 



10,584 18 



7,442 43 

14,396 77 
400 23 



22,239 43 



136,453 26 

63,647 78 
3,987 44 



204,088 48 



87,956 95 7 



,233 96 53,533 79 
407 21 21,962 17 



1,406 01 



17,631 36 



13,850 15 
177,303 06 



10 



53 



46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.' 


1 




A 


. 188S| 


Expenditure on SLIDES AND BOOMS 
STAFF AND EEPAIRS 

QUEBEC- 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


~ 

5 

P 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


n 


Brought forward. 

Ottawa Dist.Works, 
Repairs— Con. 

Black River 

Dumoine River. 

Riviere des 
Prairies— Sault 
auRecolletPier 

Totals 


I. 

207 

III. 

65 


$ cts. 
11,607 52 

315 90 


I. 

241 


$ cts. 
13,297 04 

362 00 


I. 

294 
295 


$ cts 
13,282 G6 

639 59 
1,935 87 


I. 

283 


$ cts. 
13,162 31 

10,894 31 


II. 

335 
335 


$ cts. 
16,973 2J 


1? 


3,624 0' 


13 

































11,923 42 




13,659 04 




15,857 52 




24,056 62 


.... 


20,597 3 




Grand Totals 








32,324 55 


27,463 59 


33,670 31 




41,948 71 


40,338 7 


OXTA 


1 


Ottawa District 
Works, Staff (pro- 
portion of expen- 
diture) 


I. 

209 

III. 

65 

I. 

207 

III. 

65 

207 

III.. 

65 

III. 
66 


6,995 83 

2,812 64 

3,055 01 
115 10 


I. 

249 

240 
241 

240 

241 

240 


7,209 85 

4,212 19 

6,084 07 
389 93 


I. 
294 

294 
295 

294 
295 

295 


7,965 60 

4,900 26 

10,635 87 
475 49 


I. 

282 

283 

283 
283 


8,592 50 

2,541 32 

9,660 07 
1,194 80 


II. 
335 

335 

335 
335 


7,601 9 

6,459 3 

11,136 8 
709 8 


2 

3 

4 


ttawa River Works 
(proportion of ex- 
penditure) 

Madawaska River... 

Petewawa do ... 
Totals ......... 




12,978 58 




17,896 04 




23,977 22 




21,988 69 


336 
336 


25,907 £ 




Newcastle Staff. 

do Repairs 

do Contingencies 

Totals 


I. 

209 

III. 

67 

I. 

210 

III. 

67 


5 

6 

7 


844 61 
4,377 61 


242 
243 


486 00 
3,249 49 


297 
297 


507 28 
2,935 49 


281 
284 


994 50 
6,987 21 


G21 ( 
7,664 ( 




























5,222 22 




3,735 49 




3,442 77 




7,981 71 




8,285 1 




Grand Totals- 







18,200 80 




21,631 53 




27,419 99 


29,970 40 




31,193 1. 



54 






46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

&c. — Continued. 

Concluded 





30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 






1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


as 

s 




221 
221 

204 


$ cts. 
12,023 06 

2,926 05 
1,086 46 

244 77 


II. 

204 
204 

203 


% cts. 
16,465 13 

700 00 
937 97 

1,646 36 


II. 

257 
257 


$ cts. 
46,199 36 

162 78 
2,154 93 


II. 
283 


$ cts. 
16,661 93 

528 17 


II. 

265 
265 


$ cts. 
17,631 36 

1,740 79 
1,252 84 


$ cts. 
177,303 06 

18,269 59 
10,992 14 

1,891 13 


1] 

1? 








n 






















16,280 34 




. 19,749 46 




48,517 07 




17,190 10 




20,624 99 


208,455 92 


14 






41,382 92 


51,660 32 




78,282 75 




45,642 29 




42,069 65 


434,783 83 






RIO. 




II. 
221 

221 

221 
221 


7,147 79 

3,607 81 

1,423 58 
3,782 45 


II. 
203 

203 

204 
204 


10,893 49 

4,C88 95 

3,413 42 
12,848 00 


II. 
256 

256 

257 
257 


10,913 35 

16,532 44 

2,588 59 
3,336 01 


II. 
283 

283 
283 


10,052 39 

3,044 88 
2,932 51 


II 
265 

265 

265 
265 


10.584 18 

5,233 96 

2.882 06 
2,368 82 


87,956 95 

53,433 80 

53,812 02 
25,220 42 


1 

2 

3 

4 















15,961 63 




31,243 86 




33,370 39 




16,029 78 




21,069 02 


220,423 19 






221 
221 


690 18 
5,393 23 


204 
204 


1,976 28 
5,969 47 


258 
258 


2,250 52 
2,716 26 


284 

284 

284 


2,300 82 

2,302 75 
60 eo 


266 

266 
266 


2,325 03 

3,540 89 
7 20 


12,996 87 

45,133 48 
67 20 


5 

6 
7 




















— 


6,083 41 




7,945 75 




4,966 78 




4,663 57 




5,873 12 


58,200 55 






22,045 04 




39,189 61 




38,337 17 




20,693 35 




26,942 14 


278,623 74 


















55 













46 


Victoria. 




Sessional Papers 


, (No. 10.) 






A 


, 18S3 


1 


Abstract Statement of Expenditure on SLIDES and BOOMS— 






Name 
of 

Work. 


Year ended 


I 


1 

B 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 




i 






% cts. 

32.324 55 
18,200 80 




$ cts. 

27,463 59 
21,631 53 


$ cts. 

1 33,670 31 

.... 1 27,419 99 




$ cts. 

41,948 71 
29,979 40 




$ cts 

40,338 7 
34,193 7 




*> 










Total 










50,525 35 




49,095 12 


j 61,090 30 




71,919 11 




74,532 4 












Yearly Expenditure 01 

NOV, 






Mail road between 
Liverpool and 
Annapolis 






I. 
161 


670 91 


I. 
185 


839 01 






















NE\ 


[ft 


1 


Apohaqui Bridge... 


I. 

126 


2,368 34 








































QU 




1 


Gatineau Bridge.... 
Gulf Road 


III. 

46 


272 10 


I. 




I. 




I. 




II. 






2 










204 

199 
204 


8,952 66 
3,583 84 


252 

252 
253 


1,047 ; 
3,200 i 




3 

4 


Metapediac Road.... 

Petite NationBridge 
Ottawa Union Sus- 
pension Bridge 
(proportion of Ex- 
penditure) 


I. 

126 

III. 

48 

III. 

48 

I. 

209 


6,511 31 
300 66 

545 99 


161 


1,568 30 


185 
295 


1,716 25 
385 20 




5 


242 


360 97 


283 


50 00 


335 
337 

252 

337 


522 ' 
(a) 
1,700 

25 




6 


Portage du Fort 
Bridge 






: 


7 
8 


Port Louis and Hun- 
tingdon Road 

Restigouche Road.. 

Temiscouata Road . 
Generally 


I. 

126 

126 

III. 

47 

I. 

126 

III. 

48 

III. 
48 


8,691 08 
8,335 82 

652 87 
3,127 0C 


158 


2,726 39 


185 


25 82 


204 


45 00 




S 


161 


502 00 






204 
356 


3,656 32 


252 


2,211 




1C 










Totals 






















28,436 83 




5,157 6Q 




2,127 27 


16,287 82 


8,707 ; 






(a) Including $1 


500] 


">aid by Mur 


licipa 


lity. (b) $ 

56 


H,00( 


) granted b 


j the 


Ontario Gc 


>vern 


ment. 


v 





I 

46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 




Staff and Eepairs, &c, ior the undermentioned years. 




30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 






1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 








$ cts. 

41,382 92 

22,045 04 




$ cts. 

51,660 32 
39,189 61 





$ cts. 

78,282 75 
38,337 17 

116.619 92 




$ cts. 

45,642 29 
20,693 35 




$ cts. 

42,069 65 
26,942 14 


$ cts. 

434,783 83 
278,623 74 


1 
2 






63,427 96 




90,849 93 




66,335 64 




69,011 79 


713,407 57 






ROADS and BRIDG-ES. 

SCOTIA. 
























1,509 92 


1 




























BRUNSWICK. 
























2,368 34 1 




BEC. 




II. 

144 


1,300 00 


II. 
171 


1,350 00 


II. 
222 


400 00 


II. 

276 


100 00 






272 10 
10,000 00 

19,729 70 
685 86 

3,418 52 
17,066 20 

12,093 25 
8,335 82 

20,991 16 
3,127 00 


1 
2 








4 

5 
6 


,'.' 


221 
144 

144 


451 02 
11,817 90 

180 00 


205 

174 

171 


1,324 64 
3,547 73 

294 36 


236 


50 44 


283 


112 50 












288 


105 60 














3 




144 


4,353 14 


171 


6,015 00 


222 


3,600 00 










q 


... 








I 


10 






18,102 06 




12,531 73 




4,050 44 




318 10 






95,719 61 


























57 













46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 188! 


t 


Expenditure on EOADS and BKIDG-El 

ONT. 






Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended l 




o 

— 
B 


1863. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 




1 


Dunnville Bridge... 
Fort William Road. 

Ottawa Union Sus- 
pension Bridge 
(proportion of Ex- 
penditure) 

Ottawa, Chaudiere 
Bridge 

Red River & Trans- 
port Service 
— Construction — 
(proportion of Ex- 
penditure) 


III. 

67 
I. 

121 

209 


cts. 
2,573 65 

1,000 00 
545 99 


I. 


$ cts 


I. 


$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ ctj 




2 

o 

4 

5 


155 

242 


14,900 00 
360 97 


312 
298 


98,361 15 

25 00 


299 
283 


84,966 92 
50 00 


357 

335 
337 

357 


9,967 : 
522 ! 

187,675 




6 

7 


Red River & Trans- 
port Service 
—Staff and Re- 
pairs-Proportion 
of Expenditure). . 

Windsor andScugog 
Roads 


III. 
67 


581 65 
474 05 
















R 


York Roads 






II. 

82 


1,170 91 














Totals 








— 




5,175 34 




15,260 97 




99,557 06 




85,016 92 




198,165 




MA 




1 


Boats for Transport 
Service 






I. 




n. 

314 
312 


27,119 99 
25,445 61 


I. 

301 
299 


45,073 02 
23,875 59 


II. 
"357 


'i00,109" 




0| 


Fort Garrv Road.... 






155 


4,213 13 


:; 


3 


do Bridge (over 
Red River) 








4 


Red River Route and 
Transport Service 
Construction 


















357 


26,810 




5 


do Staff and 
Repairs 


















• 




Totals 
































4,213 13 




52,565 60 




68,948 61 




126,920! 
















Abstract Statement of Expenditure ( 


U 


i 


Nova Scotia 








670 91 




839 01 












? 


New Brunswick 

Quebec 




2,368 34 

28,436 83 

5,175 34 














a 




5,157 66 

15,260 97 

4,213 13 




2,127 27 
99,557 06 
52,565 60 




16,287 82 
85,016 92 
68,948 61 




8,707 
198, 165 W 
126, 920 14 




4 


Ontario 






fi 


Manitoba 




I ' 




Totals 








1- 




35,980 51 




25,302 67 




155,088 94 




170,253 35 




333,793 i 














58 

















40 


Victor 


ia. 




Sessional Pape 


rs (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 


for the undermentioned years— Concluded. 
MO. 


30th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


S 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


% cts. 


II. 


% cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


% cts. 
2,573 65 

209,195 38 

3,443 49 
20,000 00 

452,415 21 

521,778 01 

581 65 
1,644 96 


T 


221 

239 
239 


451 02 

103,070 17 
100,307 61 


205 

174 
174 


1,324 63 

126,422 86 
201,149 64 


236 

222 
222 


50 43 

24,712 56 
129,864 59 


283 

283 

252 
252 


112 50 

Govt. Grant. 

20,000 00 

10,533 94 
66,727 44 






1 






4t 






5 


241 


23,728 73 


6 

7 






















8 


— 






















203,828 80 




328 ; 897 13 




154,627 58 




97,373 88 




23,728 73 


1,211,632 35 




fOBA. 


II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 




72,193 01 
226,513 67 

2,967 10 

64,630 75 
74,539 71 


1 


239 


27,869 84 


171 
174 

174 
174 


45,000 00 
2,967 10 

18,060 41 
28,735 66 














?, 














3 


145 
239 


14,724 31 
14,329 66 


222 
222 


3,530 37 
18,552 09 


252 
252 


1,504 85 
9,532 49 






4 


242 


3,389 81 


5 




56,923 81 




94,763 17 




22,082 46 




11,037 34 




3,389 81 


440,844 24 




IOADS and BRIDGES. 






















1,509 92 

2,368 34 

95,719 61 

1,211,632 35 

440,844 24 


1 






















?, 


... 


18,102 06 

203.828 80 

56,923 81 




12,531 73 

328,897 13 

94,763 17 




4,050 44 

154,627 58 

22,082 46 

180,760 48 


— 


318 10 
97,373 88 
11,037 34 






3 




23,728 73 
3,389 81 


4 
5 




278 854 67 




436,192 03 


108,729 32 




27,118 54 


1,752,074 46 
















■59 













16 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1SS 



Expenditure on SURVEY 



Name 

of 
Work. 



Nova Scotia 

P. E. Island 

New Brunswick. 
Quebec 



Ontario 

N.-W. Territories. 
British Columbia.. 



Totals. 



Year ende 



1868. 



I. 

121 



121 
121 



121 

III. 

45 



$ cts. 
339 29 



339 29 

2,738 44 



2,888 64 



6,305 66 



1869. 



I. 

157 



157 
157 



157 



$ cts. 
46 35 



392 84 
4,882 91 



3,045 42 



5,367 52 



1870. 



I. 

179 



179 
179 



179 



$ cts. 
123 45 



123 45 

6,415 23 



1,190 90 



7,853 03 



1871. 



I. 

203 



203 
203 



203 



$ cts. 
566 65 



566 64 
7,791 01 



7,991 55 



16,918 B5 



1872. 



II. 

260 



260 
260 



260 



371 



$ c 
1,028 



733 
2,239 



8,320 



116 



12,437 



AEBITE 



Arbitrations. 



I. 


















122 


















III. 




I. 




I. 




I. 




II. 


46 


2,416 66 


158 


1,000 00 


180 


7,489 78 


204 


5,563 80 


261 



4,329 



Yearly Expenditure 
CONSTK1 



Manitoba 

British Columbia. 



Totals. , 



WORK] 



British Columbia.. 
Prince Ed. Island. 



Totals. 



Yearly Expenditure 



1 British Columbia. 



60 



In Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 


ir the undermentioned years. 


)th June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


■-•■ 
-0 
5 

3 


$ cts. 
JO 909 08 


II. 
175 


$ Ct3. 

6,876 68 


II. 
248 


$ cts. 

7,078 91 

140 00 

7,078 90 

1,675 41 

19,032 76 


II. 
277 

"277 

277 

277 


$ cts. 

6,878 52 

58 33 

6,878 52 

708 56 

28,396 17 


II. 

259 

259 
259 
259 

259 


$ cts. 

3,938 03 
1,038 87 
5,675 90 
1,114 88 

25,638 09 


$ cts. 

27,785 28 

1,237 20 

33,487 56 

47,318 88 

125,638 31 
681 99 
369 50 


1 
2 
3 
4 

5 


>0 4,903 37 
1)0 11,032 22 

1 

1)0 11,411 99 

>0 681 99 

\ m 253 50 


175 
175 

175 


6.795 40 
8,'720 64 

17,719 62 


248 
248 

248 


















1 




















M.. 29,192 15 




40,112 34 




35,006 01 


42,920 10 




37,405 77 


236,518 72 




RONS. 


1 


II. 

176 


8,922 82 


II. 
249 


5,222 95 


II. 
277 


5,169 28 


II. 
259 


6,234 20 


53,276 11 


1 


r .5LEGRAPH LINES 
■ON. 


5 72 00 






II. 












72 00 
9,044 00 


x 






249 


9,044 00 










2 


















72 00 




9,044 00 






9,116 00 




















KPENSES. 




5 51,990 77 


II. 

296 
205 


29,021 19 
973 33 


II. 

259 

259 


37,774 21 
1,946 66 


II. 

273 
285 
273 


4', 329 04 
1,946 66 


II. 

267 

267 


31,108 74 
1,946 66 


191,223 95 
(a) 6,813 31 


1 






. . 51,990 77 




29,991 52 




39,720 87 




43,275 70 




33,055 40 


198,037 26 




RENT and CONTINGENCIES. 


i 










II. 

285 


2,506 83 


II. 

267 


2,548 52 


5,055 35 


1 


















(a) Goveir 


men 

en 


t Subsidy. 











46 Victoria, 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 




Expenditure on LIGHT 

CONSTKUC 

nova 


'- 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


a 

JO 

S 
s 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 




1 


Anet Island 


I. 
119 

120 


$ cts. 
218 03 


I. 


$ cts. 




$ cts. 


I. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


--> 


155 


6,905 80 
















'-! 






292 00 

28 81 

121 67 

2,768 00 

138 30 

39 13 

4,667 57 

3,221 02 

310 14 

324 60 
















4 


Battery Point (or 
Lunenburg) 






6 
7 


Black Rock Point... 






















8 


Cape St. George 

Cape St. Mary 

Cariboo Island 






9 

10 




















1 1 




















12 
























13 


Little Hope Island . 
Meagher's Point .... 
Moser's Island 












204 


34 74 


256 


41 91 




14 




486 43 

3,389 84 

1,254 45 

3,010 84 

1,590 43 

47 56 

68 13 

24 51 

39 96 












l p , 




















Ifi 




















17 

18 


Peggy's Point 

Pomkett Island 

Port Hood Wharf... 

Port Medway 

Pubnico 

Ram Rock Beacon. 

Totals 























19 

^0 




















21 










































22,041 42 




6,905 80 


.... 





34 74 






... 


NE^ 


ft] 


1 


Cape Jourimain . ... 
Maisonette \ 

Portage Island and 
Preston's Beach. . 






I. 

154 

154 
154 

154 


850 00 

400 00 
272 78 

2,751 40 


I. 

209 
209 


3,383 98 
216 65 


I. 

179 
179 


670 36 


II. 
253 


6 




3 










4 


Shediac Beacon 
Light 




















5 


St. John Beacon .... 




















6 


do River Bea- 
con Li°*ht 


















,., 




Totals 




























4,274 18 




3,600 63 


670 36 




6 








* 














62 

















G Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



OUSES for the undermentioned years. 
[ON. 

toTIA. 



;b June . 




Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 




. 1 $ Ct*. 

1 


1 


$ cts. 




$ cts 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 
218 03 

6.905 80 
292 00 

28 81 

121 67 

2,768 00 

138 30 

39 13 

4,667 57 

3,221 02 

310 14 

324 60 

12,295 09 

486 43 

3,389 84 

1,254 45 

3,010 84 

1,590 43 

47 56 

68 13 

24 51 

39 96 


l 




















a 




















3 


] 


















4 




















5 




















fi 




















7 




















8 




















R 




















10 

11 




















n 


14 12,218 44 


















13 


















14 




















l r » 




















16 




















17 




















18 




















l r -< 




















•>o 




















?l 




















M 






















L 12,218 44 


















41,242 31 























:u 


JNSWICK. 










































4,060 34 
216 65 

850 00 

400 00 
272 78 

2,751 40 


1 






















•> 






















? 






















4 






















^ 






















fi 








































8,551 17 


7 




































C3 











4> 


j Victoria. 




Sessional Paper 


s (No. 10,) 




A 


.. 1883 




Expenditure on LIGHTHOUSES 

CONSTBUO 
QUE 






Name 

of 
Work. 

j 


Year ended 


'.: 


— ■ 
a 
- 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


:■■. 


i 


Biequet Island 


III. 

43 
43 

I. 

118 

III. 

43 


$ cts 

48 00 
80 00 

7,160 86 


I. 


% cts. 


I. 


% cts. 




% cts. 




% cts. 


; 


9 





















s 


Paspebiac 

Point St. Laurent... 
Totals 


154 


7,492 59 


193 
193 


216 81 
1,326 25 












4 


























7,288 86 


7,492 £9 


1,543 06 
























ONT^ 




1 


Bvno- Inlet 










1. 
193 


357 69 


I. 










2 


Clapperton Island . 
False Duck do ... 


I. 

118 

III 

43 


605 20 












(a) 800"0( 




4 


Gibraltar Point 

Mull Island 


III. 
43 
43 

4* 
43 


55 00 
192 80 

660 20 
660 20 


















6 


Killarney (Leading 
Light) 




7 


Little Current 




















B 






193 


259 94 


199 


195 00 








9 
10 


Point Pleasant 

St. Ignace 


43 
43 


357 72 
605 03 













11 


Sulphur Island 






193 


2,359 20 














Totals 














3,136 15 








2,976 83 




195 00 




800 Oi 














BRITISH 




1 


























































(a 


) Pui 


chase price 
64 


of Is 


land. 




- 









1G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



>r the undermentioned years — Continued. 

ION — Continued. 
SC. 

























Cth June. 


Total for 
Ten Years, 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 




1877. 


a 


$ cts. 




$ cts 




$ cts. 




$ cts 




% cts. 


% cts. 

48 00 
80 00 

216 81 
15,979 70 


i 




















3 




















4 




































16,324 51 
























). 




















357 69 

605 20 
800 00 

55 00 
192 80 

660 20 
660 20 

454 94 

357 72 

605 03 

2,359 20 


1 





















2 




















4 




















5 




















fi 




















7 
8 




















q 




















10 




















11 






















J 
















7,107 98 

























.UMBIA. 



II. 

309 



2,362 54 



2,362 54 



10 a— 5 



05 



46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 


Abstract Statement of Expenditure on LIGHT 




Name 

of 
Work. 


Year ended 


3 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 




1 
? 


Nora Scotia 




$ cts. 
22,041 42 




$ cts. 

6,905 80 
4,274 18 
7,492 59 




$ cts. 

"3*600 63 
],543 06 

2,976 83 




$ cts. 

34 74 
670 36 




$ cts 

41 9J 
6 0| 


1 1 


3 


Quebec 




7,288 86 
3,136 15 






4 








195 00 




800 01 

847 9 




5 


British Columbia.... 
Totals 












...... 


32,466 43 


.... 


18,672 57 




8,120 52 




900 10 

















Expenditure on Account TUG SERVIC] 


1 


Quebec 


I. 

127 
127 


6,000 00 
6,000 00 


I. 

161 

161 


6,000 00 
6,000 00 


I. 

186 

186 


6,000 00 
6,000 00 


I. 
130 

130 


6,000 00 
6,000 00 


II. 

155 

337 

155 

337 


6,094 J 
6,094 J 


? 


Ontario 




Totals.., 




12,000 00 


12,000 00 




12,000 00 


12,000 00 




12,188 i 
























miscelI 



Stationery, &c. 



II. 
337 



1,264 



66 





16 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 




A. 1883 




IOUSES — Construction — for the undermentioned years. 




Oth June. 


Total for 
Ten Years 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 






1873. 


1874. 


1875. 




1876. 


1877. 


c 

1 


% 
11 

SI 




$ cts. 
12,218 44 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 

41,242 31 

8,551 17 

16,324 51 

7,107 98 
2,362 54 


] 

2 
























3 


'M 






















4 




11 






2,362 54 














5 


















i; 


12,218 44 




2,362 54 














75,588 51 




__ 
















n 


et 


vs T een M 


onti 


real and 


Ki 


ngston. 















:i. 




II. 




II. 


.38 










!20 


6,033 22 


148 


6,000 00 


170 


,38 










!20 


6,033 22 


148 


6,000 00 


170 


.... 


12,066 44 


12,000 00 





6,023 72 
6,023 71 



12,047 43 



48,151 43 
48,151 41 



96,302 84 



3 



NEOUS. 



II. 
207 



101 63 



1,365 701 



10 a— 5\ 



67 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 






Statement showing amounts contributed by Municipalities, &c, towards! 

Statements, from 1st July \ 





Work. 




■ — * 


as 

£ 

- 


1871. 


1872. 


1 . 


1 


Harbours — 

Bayfield (Municipality of Stanley) 


I. 


$ Ct3- 


II. 


$ cts) 




? 


Cobourg (Commissioners Harbour Trust, Cobourg) 












S 


Collingwood (Northern Railway Co.) 












4 


Goderich (Municipality Township of Goderich) 






, 






p , 


Meaford ( do St. Vincent) 














Total Harbours 



























Rivers — 

NapaDee River, Ont 












fi 










Salmon do 


198 


2,400 00 










Total Rivers 










2,4c0 00 




— 




Roads and Bridges- 
Portage du Fort Bridge (Grant by Government, Ont.) 








8 






252 


1,500 CI 






Grand Totals 












2,400 00 




1,500 (1 



























68 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 





instruction of the undermentioned "Works, and included in previous 
L867, to 30th June, 1877. 




Year ended 30th June. 


Total. 






1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 






II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 

254 

254 


$ Ct3. 

10,000 00 
25,507 49 


' $ ets. 
10,000 00 
25,507 49 
28,268 26 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 


? 




















2 








190 


15,505 00 


237 
239 
238 


12,763 26 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 






3 
















4 




















E 






























15,505 00 


32,763 26 








35,507 49 


83,775 75 












251 






















5,000 00 






5,000 00 
2,400 00 


6 




















hf 








































5,000 00 






7,400 00 














44 


4,000 00 
















5,500 00 


8 
























4,000 00 




15,505 00 




32,763 26 




5,000 00 


35,507 49 


96,675 75 































69 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Comparative Statement of Expenditure on 



Yea 



Xame of Work. 



Railways— Construction , 

do Working expenses. 

Canals— Construction 

do Staff and Repairs 



Totals, Railways and Canals. 



Public Buildings— Construction 

do Repairs, &c 

Harbours and Breakwaters 

Improvements of Rivers 

Dredges — Construction 

Dredging 

Slides and Booms — Construction 

do Staff and Repairs 

Roads and Bridges 

Telegraph Lines — Construction. 

do Working Expenses 

Lighthouses— Construction , 

Miscellaneous, viz . : — 

Surveys 

Arbitrations 

Tug Service between Montreal and Kingston 

Agent and Contingencies, B.C , 

Sundries 



Totals, Public Works. 
Grand Totals 



1868. 



$ cts. 

483,353 65 
359,961 08 
128,965 35 
246,221 14 



1,218,501 22 



105 960 71 

47,323 60 

8,650 55 



6,827 72 

4,398 85 

50,525 35 

35,980 51 



32,466 43 

6,305 66 

2,416 66 

12,000 00 



312,856 04 
1,531,357 26 



1869. 



$ cts. 

282,615 18 
387,548 47 
126,953 20 
261,965 18 



1,059,082 03 



1870. 



$ cts. 

1,729,381 49 
445,208 75 
105,588 26 
301,486 69 



2,581.665 19 



113,453 74 

68,427 24 

4,442 35 



3,243 60 
49,095 12 
25,302 67 



18,672 57 

8,367 52 

1,000 00 

12,000 00 



304,004 81 



1,363,086 84 



73,514 72 

73,375 51 

4,034 63 



300 00 

61,090 30 

155,088 94 



1871. 



2,946,930 
442,993 3 
133,872 
302,383 31 



3,826,180 



410,101 
76,344 
27,977 
4,983 1} 
25,083 71 
1,788 a 
3,781 6 
71,919 t 
170,253 



8,120 52 

7,853 03 

7,489 78 

12,000 00 



411,741 10 



2,993,406 29 



900 

16,918 

5,563 

12,000 



827,615 



4,653,795 



a. b. c. d. — For remarks, see pages 72 and 73. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Public Works for the undermentioned years. 



ended 30th June. 










Total for 
Ten Years 

to 30th 
June, 1877. 




1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877, 


a 


$ cts. 

5.620,569 67 
595,076 22 
290,073 52 
302,240 72 


$ cts. 

5,763,268 81 

1 011,892 60 

383,916 82 

368,341 42 


$ cts 

3,925,123 69 

1,847,925 24 

1,240,628 96 

414,771 00 


$ cts. 

5,018,427 85 

1,581,934 24 

1,715 309 37 

401,877 23 


$ cts. 

4,497,434 75 

1,497,128 22 

2,389,544 21 

402,907 40 


$ cts. 

3,209,502 16 

1,890,268 80 

4,131,396 60 

350,926 19 


$ cts. 

33,476,607 70 

10,059,936 93 

10,646,249 18 

3,353,120 32 


l 

2 

3 
4 


6,807,960 13 


7,527,419 65 


7,428,448 89 


8,717,548 69 


8,787,014 58 


9,582,093 75 


57,535,914 13 




578,936 80 

121,834 58 

185,481 25 

2,985 90 

13,778 62 

7,960 07 

64,800 80 

74,532 45 

333,793 95 


422,030 11 

187,820 75 

342,909 99 

37,300 27 

37,063 20 

39,180 52 

59,046 65 

63,427 96 

278,854 67 

72 00 

51,990 77 

12,218 44 

29,192 15 

6,926 72 

12,066 44 


600.962 73 

259,788 91 

346,668 68 

68,020 26 

53,473 86 

44,426 57 

89,215 86 

90,849 93 

436,192 03 


800,812 38 

277,199 58 

440,911 30 

104,810 84 

103,499 43 

51,941 75 

20,986 87 

116,619 92 

180,760 48 

9,044 00 

39,720 87 


1,075,483 24 

243,022 19 

599,014 49 

61,125 83 

26,545 68 

68,841 75 

25,438 60 

66,335 64 

108,729 32 


736,240 29 

246,247 54 

401,832 70 

27,385 78 

3,142 99 

79,306 50 

120 00 

69,011 79 

27,118 54 


4,917,495 77 

1,601,384 55 

(^2,361,923 03 

(b) 306,612 07 

271,461 21 

300,273 86 

271,333 03 

713,407 57 

(c)l,752,074 46 

9,116 00 

198,037 26 

(d) 75,588 51 

236,518 72 

53,276 11 

96,302 84 

5,055 35 

1,365 70 


5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 




29,994 52 
2,362 54 

40,112 34 

8,922 82 

12,000 00 


43,275 70 


33,055 40 


15 


847 91 


16 


12,437 29 
4,329 90 
12,188 97 


35,006 01 

5,222 95 

12,047 43 


42,920 10 
5,169 28 


37,405 77 
6,234 20 


17 

18 
19 


2,506 83 


2,548 52 


?o 


1,264 07 




101 63 




31 














1,415,172 56 


1,580,100 64 


2,083,092 68 


2,198,583 81 


2,368,408 65 


1,669,650 02 


13,171,226 04 




$323,132 69 


9,107,520 29 


9,511,541 57 


10,916,132 50 


* 11, 155,423 23 


11,251,743 77 


70,707,140 17 





40 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188: 



General Abstract of Expenditure on PUBLIC WOKKS and BUILDINGS 



WOEKS. 



Intercolonial Railway— Construction 

do Working expenses 

Nova ScQtia and New Brunswick — Construction 

do do Working expenses 

Prince Edward Island Railway — Construction 

do Working expenses 

Pacific Railway — Construction 

Canals do , 

do Staff and repairs 



Total Railways and Canals. 



Public Buildings— Construction 

do Repairs, &c 

Harbours and Breakwaters 

Improvements of Rivers 

Dredges— Construction 

Dredging 

Slides and Booms— Construction 

do Staff and Repairs 

Roads and Bridges 

Telegraph Lines — Construction 

do Working expenses 

Lighthouses — Construction 

Miscellaneous, viz. : 

Surveys 

Arbitrations *. 

Tug Service between Montreal and Kingston. 

Agent and Contingencies, British Columbia.., 

Sundries .., 



Total Public Works. 
Grand Totals 



Nova Scotia. 



$ 



cts. 



6,136,878 97 
2,453,723 37 
1,801,461 89 
1,406,933 37 



212,909 24 
19,058 96 



12,030,965 80 



154,267 13 
47,175 01 

561,873 00 
9,998 76 

101,061 40 
81,243 99 



1,509 92 



41,242 31 
27,785 28 



1,026,156 80 



13,057,122 60 



Entered 
Confederation. 



1st July, 1873. 



P. E. Island. 



cts. 



288,632 73 
498,620 30 



787,253 03 



73,385 62 

9,926 88 

56,011 53 



23,582 07 
31,940 92 



6,813 31 



1,237 20 



202,897 53 



990,150 56 



New 

Brunswick, 



10,881,888 
4,-353,261 
824,689 21 
823,854 



43,867 



16,927,561 4 



383,316 Ei 
32,882 2| 

298,517 i 
40,376 

101,061 4( 
91,488 ] 



2,368 = 



8,551 
33,487 



992,050 < 



17,919,611 



(a) Including $83,775.75 contributed by Municipalities, Ac— See page 69. 
(6) do 7,400.00 do do do 69. 

(c) do 5,500.00 do Local Government, Ontario— See page 69. 



72 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



from 1st July, 1867, (date of Confederation) to 30th June, 1877. 



Quebec. 


Ontario 
$ cts. 


Entered Confederation. 


Miscellaneous 

not 
Apportioned 

to 
any of the 
Provinces. 


Totals. 




1st July, 1870. 


20th July, 
1871/' 




Manitoba. 


North-West 
Territories. 


British 
Columbia. 


sc 


$ cts. 

5,567,477 84 
523,543 71 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

22,586,245 30 

7,330,528 80 

2,626,151 17 

2,230,787 83 

288,632 73 

498,620 30 

7,975,578 50 

10,646,249 18 

3,353,120 32 


\ 












2 












3 














4 














<5 














6 


""4,234,65*4 12 

1,329,556 81 


3,930,137 25 
6,121,004 14 
1,957,368 50 


1,612,055 49 


848,140 40 
32,675 65 


1,585,245 36 






1,138 50 
47,136 05 


P 






q 










11,655,232 48 


12,008,509 89 


1,612,055 49 


880,816 05 


1,585,245 36 


48,274 55 


57,535,914 13 




1,314.065 90 
157,697 55 
129,114 26 
175,497 51 


2,378,079 87 

1,318,912 97 

1,316,406 48 

64,004 27 

38,058 37 

22,258 88 

37,529 29 

278,623 74 

1,211,632 35 


222,730 61 
28,628 38 


141,699 97 
100 00 


210,021 97 
5,406 53 


39,928 16 
655 00 


4.917,495 77 

1,601,384 55 

(a)2,361,923 03 

(b) 306,612 07 

271,461 21 

300,273 86 

271,333 03 

713,407 57 

(c)l, 752,074 46 

9,116 00 

198,037 26 

id) 75,588 51 

236,518 72 

53,276 11 

96,302 84 

5,055 35 

1,365 70 


10 
11 


5,234 90 




11,499 69 

7,697 96 

56,771 09 




n 






M 


16,570 88 
233,803 74 
434,783 83 

95,719 61 








15 








If? 










17 


440,844 24 
72 00 








1R 




9,044 00 
191,223 95 




19 








?,n 


.1 16,3*24 51 


7,107 98 
125,638 31 








?,] 


M 47,318 88 








M 






53,276 11 


23 












?4 








5,055 35 




«H5 












2fi 


























13,171,226 04 














70,707,140 17 





(d) Shows only expenditure made through Public Works Department, the construction of such 
iighthouses as will cost less than $10,000 having been transferred to the Department of Marine and 
Fisheries by Order in Council (No. 9728), dated 28th February, 1870. 



O. DIONNE, 

Accountant. 



73 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on account of Works authorized by SPECIAL!] 



Work. 



St. Lawrence River (deepening between Quebec and 
Montreal) 



Quebec Harbour Improvements , 



Authority. 



30 Vic. , c. 60, 23rd May, 1873 
36 Vic, c. 62, 23rd May, 1873 



Amount 
Authorized. 



$ cts. 
1,500,000 00 

1,200,000 00 



74 



16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1S83 



ACTS of Parliament, from 1st July, 1867, to 30th June, 1877. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Totals. 


1874. 


1875. 


1876. 


1877. 


Xlla 

: Xlla 


$ cts. 
275,000 00 

724,140 00 


XII 


$ cts. 
269,000 00 


XI 


$ cts. 
192,000 


XIX 


$ cts. 
122,000 00 


$ cts. 
858,000 00 

724,140 00 
















999,140 00 


269,000 00 


192,000 CO 


122,000 00 


1,582,140 00 


















• 



75 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on RAILWAYS 
COKSTRuJ 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 






s 


1878. 




I 






$ cts. 

22,586,245 30 

1,801,461 89 

824,689 28 

288,632 73 

7,975,578 50 


II. 
200 

"200 
222 


$ cts. j 
408,816 74 1 

" "6,551* 86" 1 
2,228,373 13 1 




2 








3 


European and North American, N.B. 






4 






5 








6 










Totals 














33,476,607 70 




2,643,741 73 1 


1 










WORKING 1 


p 


1 


Intercolonial 




7,330,528 80 

1,406,933 37 

823,854 46 

498,620 30 


247 


1,811,273 56 I 




2 








a 


Europeon and North American, N.B. 
Prince Edward Island 










4 


248 


221 ) 599 > 49 1 


1. 


5 


Pacific i 








Totals 














10,059,936 93 


2,032,873 05 I 


1 










Yearly Expenditure! 

CONSTKUCJl 

NOVil 


r 


1 


St. Peter's. 




138,433 09 
74,476 15 


n. 
"195 


'"26,5li'5lH 




2 


do Enlarging and Deepening.... 
Totals 




1 




212,909 24 


26,511 51 1 












NEV 




1 


Baie Verte 




43,867 53 




















QU 




1 


Lachine 


Jac. Cartier & Hochelaga 
do 


228,770 58 
1.990,188 15 








2 


do Enlargement 


193 


1,484,619 6it 1 
I. 




3 


Beauharnois 




4 


do Land Damages 


do 


68,488 25 
102,799 48 

74,071 52 

1,110,992 11 

320,613 02 

235,808 12 

10,810 25 

92,112 64 




:::::::.:: , 




5 


Ste. Anne's Lock 


Jacques Cartier 

Argenteuil 

do 


194 


14,618 8JG 




fl 


Carillon and Grenville 




7 


do Enlargement- 

Carillon & Chute a Blondeau Dam,&c 
Oulbute Rapids Lock 




:::;:'::::::'Z"'h 




fl 


do 


195 
195 

"l94 


22,676 2- 
5,933 &jf. 

2,785*2| 




5 


Pontiac 




10 


Chamblv 


St. John and Chambly.... 




11 


St. Lawrence (proportion of Exp' ture) 
Totals 












4,234,654 12 


1,530,633 4J 













40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years. 





Year 


ended 30th June. 






Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 






1879. 


1880. 




1881. 


1882. 


01 

Xi 

s 




II. 

219 


$ Cts. 
226,639 19 


II. 
219 


$ cts. 
2,048,014 60 


II. 
234 


$ cts. 
608,732 80 


II. 
241 


$ Cts. 
585,568 79 


$ cts. 

26,464,017 42 

1,801,461 89 

824,689 28 

352,255 49 

26,048,125 74 

522 00 


1 

2 




















2 




220 

243 


40,129 05 
2,240,285 47 


220 
226 
248 


16,539 82 

4,044,522 72 

522 00 


240 


* * "ij 968/503*93 


241 
245 
295 


402 03 
4,590,861 99 


4 

5 
6 






2,507,053 71 


6,109,599 14 


5,577,236 73 




5.176,832 81 


55,491,071 82 






EXPENSES. 




273 


2,010,183 22 


257 

258 


1,607,956 70 


287 


1,780,353 53 


305 


2,080,592 37 


16,620,888 18 
1,406,933 37 

823,854 46 
1,539,556 31 

318,407 87 


1 
2 




















3 




273 


223,313 12 


257 
258 


164.640 55 
78,892 01 


287 
287 


203,122 88 
236,944 98 


305 
305 


228,259 97 
2,570 88 


4 

5 




.... 








2,233,496 34 




1,851.489 26 


2,220,421 39 




2,311,423 22 


20,709,640 19 






ii CANALS. 

TON; 












ii. 




II. 




II. 




II 




138,433 09 
358,364 71 


I 




216 


107,337 75 


214 


80,120 54 


230 


69,434 76 


234 


484 00 


2 




.... 


107,337 75 




80,120 54 


230 


69,434 76 




484 00 


496,797 80 






RUNSWICK. 






1 




278 


520 00 






44.387 53 


I 






1 " 












EC, 
























295 

230 


2.978 66 
252,821 33 


231,749 24 

5,347,414 66 

266 15 

68,488 25 

404,787 15 

74,071 52 

1,773,586 22 

975,142 54 

313,412 81 

42,606 66 

122,068 74 


} 




14 


958,053 30 


212 
213 


369,566 74 
266 15 


225 


292,165 51 


2 

?> 














4 


14 


22,113 02 


213 


3,054 68 


228 


69,042 76 


233 


193,158 36 


5 

6 


15 
15 
15 


218,625 24 
24,516 00 
20,694 19 


214 
213 
214 


78,297 58 

203,216 69 

16,688 20 


229 
229 
229 


145,380 97 

191,326 56 

4,721 62 


233 
233 

234 
295 
239 


220,290 32 

212,794 07 

29,567 15 

31,796 41 

14,466 73 


7 
8 
9 
10 




4,632 88 


213 


4,607 28 


226 


3,463 98 


11 




1,248,634 63 


675,697 32 




706,101 40 




957,873 03 


9,353,593 94 





46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18831 



Expenditure on CANALS for 
CONSTRUO 

ONTA 



Name of Work. 



Cornwall 

do Enlargement 

Williamsburgh i 

Welland 



do 
Rideau. 



Enlargement 



Burlington Bay 

Murray — Survey 

Sault Ste. Maiie — Survey 

St. Lawrence (proportion of expendi 

ture) , 

River Tay — Survey 

Trent 



Totals. 



County. 



Stor'mont 

do 

Grenville and Dundas.. 

Haldimand, Welland and 

Lincoln 

do do 

Frontenac, Leeds, Gren- 
ville and Carleton.... 

Wentworth 

Northumberland 

Algoma District 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts 

44,057 55 

49,211 37 

1,077 00 

172,122 90 
5,707,746 67 

59,564 81 



400 00 
949 35 

85,874 49 



6,121,004 14 



1878. 



II. 



194 



198 



194 



$ cts. 



145,015 45 
2,'l38,'3'92"99' 



2,785 23 



2,286,193 67 



NORTH-WEST' 



Canal and Land Surveys. , 



32,675 65 



GENE! 



1,138 50 







Abstract Statement of ExpeD 


1 


Nova Scotia 




212,909 24 

43,867 53 

4,234,654 12 

6,121,004 14 

32,675 65 

1,138 50 




26,511 61 

' lJ530,633 44 I 
2,286,193 67 | 


fl 


New Brunswick ,. 




3 


Quebec 




4 


Ontario 




F) 


North- West Territories 




fi 








Totals 










10,646,249 18 




3,843,338 62. 








CANALS-MAINTENANCE; 

NOVA 


1 


St. Peter's— 

Staff 




3,376 16 
15,682 80 


II. 
245 


6W 00| 


? 


Repairs 






Totals 










19,058 96 




600 00, 









7U 



!46 Victoria. 



Sessional Fapers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



'he undermentioned years — Continued. 
?ION— Concluded. 



LIO. 




















Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


a. 

a 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


11. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

44,057 55 

545,309 57 

1,077 00 

192,380 89 
12,498,107 36 

67,402 19 

30,426 89 

7,535 63 

949 35 

115,830 59 

748 65 

6,398 01 


i 


214 


143,092 05 


213 


109,454 95 


226 


53,948 14 


230 


44,587 61 


2 










278 
228 

275 

275 


6,593 19 
1,242,943 37 

133 50 
15,967 60 


295 
232 


13,664 80 
603,402 17_ 


4 


2!8 
215 


1,552,697 41 
7,703 88 


216 


1,252,924 75 


5 
F, 






295 
234 


14,459 29 
7,135 63 


7 


... 








8 
9 


214 


4,632 89 


213 


4,607 28 


226 


3,463 98 


230 
296 
295 


14,466 72 

748 65 

5,836 51 


10 
| 1 






213 


561 50 






I? 












.... 


1,708,126 23 


1,367,548 48 




1,323,049 78 




704,301 38 


13,510,223 68 




ERRITORIES. 


















32,675 65 






















ILLY. 










219 


1,136 84 


295 


7,610 33 


9,885 67 














dtnre on CANALS — Construction. 


.... 


107,337 75 




80,120 54 




69,434 76 

520 00 

706,101 40 

1,323,049 78 




484 00 


496,797 80 

44,387 53 

9,353,593 94 

13,510,2'3 68 

32,675 65 

9,885 67 


1 

2 


.... 


1,248,634 63 
1,708,126 23 




675,697 32 
1,367,548 48 






957,873 03 
704,301 38 


3 

4 
g 


.... 










1,136 84 




7,610 33 


6 




3,064,098 61 




2,123,366 34 




2,100,242 78 




1,670,268 74 


23,447,564 27 

























vND REPAIRS, &c. 

COTIA. 



II. 

269 
.... 


631 50 


II. 
253 


400 00 


II. 
265 


959 58 


II. 

300 

300 


1,920 54 
200 63 


7,887 78 
15,883 43 


1 
2 
















.... 


631 50 




400 00 


959 58 


2,121 17 


23,771 21 





79 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on CANALS for 

MAINTENANCE, ■ 
QUE 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

IstJuly, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




s 


1878. 


] 


Lachine — 


Jac. Cartier & Hochelaga 


$ eta. 

95,324 12 

222,291 71 

199,362 26 

650 57 


II. 

243 
243 

243 
248 


$ cts. 

10,007 18 

39,062 97 

13,646 41 

666 90 


9 


Staff 




■1 






/[ 








Totals 








517,628 66 




63,383 46 




Beauharnois — 


Beauharnois— 




*, 


8,848 63 

124,049 59 

106,059 92 

65 02 


242 
24a 
243 


1,001 87 

14,383 37 

9,861 05 


« 


Staff 




7 






R 










Totals 










239,023 16 




25,246 29 




St. Anne's Lock — 


Jacques Cartier — 


q 


7,967 30 
15,978 83 
25,289 35 


245 
245 
245 


946 55 


10 


Staff 




2,057 32 
541 95 


1 1 








Totals 








49,235 48 




3.545 82 




Carillon and Grenville— 

Collection 


Argenteuil — 




1? 


7,436 24 

89,442 86 

114,062 12 

703 58 


244 
244 
244 
249 


1,268 97 
11,401 30 
5,082 72 ! 

69 74 J 


n 


Staff 




14 






1*) 


Refunds 












211,644 80 


245 
245 
245 


17,822 73 ! 




St. Ours Lock — 




IP. 


4,665 33 
16,321 44 
13,170 03 


590 IS 

1,556 65. 1 

283 77 


17 


Staff 




18 








Totals 






34,156 80 




2,430 60 1 




Chambly — 

Collection 


St Johns & Chambly— 


19 


21,854 06 

100,670 76 

155,319 97 

23 12 


244 
244 
244 

244 


2,418 08 

10,413 99 | 

6,022 96 


?,0 


Staff 




?,] 






97 








Totals 








277,867 91 




18,855 03 j 




Culbute Rapids Lock — 

Staff 


Pontiac— 


OO 






'M 














Totals ... 


















Grand Totals 












1,329,556 81 




131,283 93 1 












80 









'46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



he undermentioned years — Continued. 



SEP 

;kc. 


AIE3, &c- 


-Cor 


tinned. 














Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882: 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


a 

a 

a 

25 


II. 1 $ cts. 

2671 9,154 01 

;267| 42,338 84 

267 12,400 78 

74 Ifift 29 


II. j 

252 

252 
252 
258 


$ cts. 

10,269 65 

38,950 90 

10,223 62 

690 30 


II. | 

282 
282 
282 
287 


$ cts. 

10,121 31 

39,027 99 

19,888 33 

340 26 


II. 

299 

299 
299 


$ cts. 

10,296 90 
41,158 90 
17,116 46 


$ cts. 

145,173 17 

422,831 31 

272,637 86 

2,507 32 


1 
2 
3 

A 


_.4j 












64,052 92 




60,134 47 




69,377 89 




68,572 26 


843,149 66 




267 
267 
267 


978 26 
15,015 86 
10,370 71 


251 
251 

251 


1,092 37 

15,362 61 

8,997 34 


281 
281 
281 


1,010 01 
17,659 93 
10,770 67 


298 
298 
298 


1,604 77 
18,804 53 
20,813 86 


14,535 91 

205,275 89 

166,873 55 

65 02 


5 
6 

7 






















26,364 83 




25,452 32 


283 
283 
283 


29,440 61 




41,223 16 


386,750 37 




;70 
270 
270 


945 17 
2,202 03 
3,259 70 


253 
253 
253 


942 46 
2,152 57 
1,704 71 


942 93 
2,553 02 
3,257 92 


301 
301 
301 


1,247 52 
2,611 30 
2,343 99 


12,991 93 
27,555 07 
36,397 62 


9 

10 
11 




6,406 90 




4,799 74 




6,753 87 


6,202 81 


76,944 62 




.'69 
?69 
269 


1,019 32 

11,501 22 

7,629 9$ 


253 
253 
253 
258 


1,282 48 

11,959 14 

7,625 54 

99 15 


283 

283 
283 


1,353 41 

13,059 18 

8,076 91 


300 
300 
300 


1,330 97 

14,387 49 

7.582 68 


13,691. 39 

151,751 19 

150,059 95 

872 47 


12 
13 
14 
15 


















20,150 52 


20,966 31 




22,489 50 




23,301 14 


316,375 00 




>70 
!70 
i70 


615 99 

1,581 55 

456 07 


254 
254 
254 


624 00 

1,614 01 

705 54 


283 
283 
283 


602 60 
1,741 97 
1,299 77 


301 
301 
301 


615 69 
2,002 71 
1,902 41 


7,713 79 
24,818 33 
17,817 59 


16 
17 

18 


.... 


2,653 61 


..."... 


2,943 55 


3,644 34 


4,520 81 


50,349 71 




:69 

!69 
?6S 


2,361 40 

11,301 53 

8,809 77 


253 
253 
253 
258 


2,443 27 

11,516 22 

12,377 74 

378 85 


282 
283 
283 
287 


2,443 31 

13,950 47 

20,705 17 

5 60 


300 
300 
300 


2,584 47 
16,686 78 
16,843 60 


34,104 59 

164,539 75 

220,079 21 

407 57 


19 

20 
21 












22,472 70 




26,716 08 




37,104 55 




36,114 85 


419,131 12 








255 


202 50 


285 


962 85 


301 


790 00 


1,955 35 
421 64 


23 
7A 
















461 81 




962 85 




952 33 


2,376 99 














142,101 48 




141,474 28 




169,773 61 




180,887 36 


2,095,077 47 






10 a— 6 








81 











46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on CANALS 

MAINTENANCE, 
OXTA 



20 



21 



22 



Name of Work. 



Cornwall — 
Collection 

Staff 

Repairs 

Refunds.... 



Totals. 



William sburgh- 
Collection. 

Staff 

Repairs .... 
Refunds...., 



Totals. 



Welland— 
Collection, 
Staff 



Repairs.. 
Refunds 



Totals 

Burlington Bay — 
Ferryman, &c. 

Repairs 

Refunds 



Totals. 



Rideau — 

Collection, 

Staff 

Repairs.... 
Refunds.... 



Totals. 



Trent Works- 
Staff 



Repairs. 



Totals. 



Fort Frances Locks 

Grand Totals. 



County. 



Stormont. 
do .. 
do .. 
do .. 



Grenville andDundas. 
do 
do 
do 



Haldimand, Welland and 
Lincoln 

do 



do 
do 



Wentworth. 
do 
do 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts 

8,064 35 

120,898 90 

71,873 95 

159 42 

200,996 62 



11,525 00 

63,649 79 

67,796 48 

65 01 



143,036 28 



63,670 94 
463,080 06 

648,210 86 
6,819 61 

1,181,781 47 



3,556 87 

4,140 74 

75 41 



7,773 02 



I- 
Frontenac, Leeds, Gren- 
ville and Carleton... 
do 
do 
do 



13,574 73 

231,225 07 

178,569 28 

412 03 



423,781 11 



1,957,368 50 



243 
243 
243 



243 
243 
243 



242 
242 



242 
248 



24# 

242 

248 



241 
241 
241 
249 



1878. 



$ cts. 

1,074 07 

13,825 50 

4,935 21 



19,834 78 



1,150 00 
7,430 11 
4,449 78 



13,029 89 ■- 



6,747 68 
60,138 59 



66,393 53 
862 65 



134,142 45 



300 00 

1,278 06 

24 56 



2,094 85 

26,651 51 

11,034 22 

25 00 



39,805 58 



208,415 32 



82 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

EEPAIRS, &c- Continued. 
EIO. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


0> 

3 

s 


II. 

268 
268 
268 

274 


$ cts. 

1,077 85 

13,817 96 

4,983 15 

216 25 


II. 

252 
252 
252 


$ cts. 

1,071 27 

14,440 33 

9,735 76 


II. 

281 
281 
281 


$ cts. 

1,086 85 

15,173 60 

5,524 10 


II. 

299 
299 
299 


$ cts. 

1,173 35 

3 5,052 20 

6,634 62 


% cts. 

13,547 74 

193,208 49 

103,686 79 

375 67 


1 

2 
3 
4 


















20,095 21 


25,247 36 





21,784 55 




22,860 17 


310,818 69 




268 
268 
268 


1,150 00 
7.517 20 
3,549 71 


252 
252 
252 


1,150 00 
7,590 15 
3,999 77 


282 
282 
282 


1,150 00 
7,572 35 
5,020 73 


299 
299 
299 


1,150 00 
7,589 44 
7,447 69 


17,275 00 

101,349 04 

92,264 16 

65 01 


5 
6 

7 
8 






















12,216 91 




12,739 92 




13,743 08 




16,187 13 


210,953 21 




266 
266 

266 

274 


7,402 20 
59,942 23 

56,755 57 
218 01 


251 

251 
251 
255 
258 


7,389 48 
63,198 10 

76,535 25 
162 97 


281 
281 

281 
287 


7,543 69 
56,398 04 

69,249 53 
13 80 


298 
298 

298 


7,321 71 
74,641 51 

84,374 97 


100,075 70 
777,398 53 

1,001,519 71 
8,077 04 


9 

10 

11 
L2 












124,318 01 




147,285 80 




133,205 06 


300 
300 


166,338 19 


1,887,070 98 




269 
269 


302 62 
418 06 


253 
253 


300 00 
3,519 80 


283 


300 00 


300 00 
240 62 


5,059 49 

9,627 28 

99 97 


13 
1 d 








15 






















750 68 




3,819 80 


280 
280 
280 
287 


300 00 


540 62 


14,786 74 




266 
266 
266 


2,111 20 

26,042 52 

7,134 55 


250 
250 
250 
258 


2,053 66 

26,463 88 

11,434 05 

61 71 


26,024 71 

8,627 00 

307 62 


297 
297 


26,915 29 
13^860 28 


24,071 42 

363,322 98 

230,659 38 

806 36 


16 
17 

18 
19 














35,288 27 


40,013 30 




37,083 30 




42,888 58 


618,860 14 








255 
248 
255 


1,188 92 
3,568 89 


285 
285 


2,489 93 
2,233 50 


301 
301 


2,011 92 
8,115 50 


5,690 77 
13,917 89 


'^0 






' 7 1 














4,757 81 


4,723 43 




10,127 42 


19,608 66 
















296 


2,559 41 


2,559 41 


10 


















192,669 08 


233,863 99 




210,839 42 




261,501 52 


3,064,657 83 





10 a— 6% 



83 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188S 



Expenditure on CANALS 
MISCELLANEOUS 





Name of Work . 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




,fl 

a 


1878. 


i 






$ cts. 
47,136 05 


• 


$ cts. 













Abstract Statement of Expenditure 



Nova Scotia... 

Quebec* , 

Ontario 

Miscellaneous, 



Totals. 



19,058 96 
1,329,556 81 
1,957,368 50 

47,136 05 



3,353,120 32 



600 00 
131,283 93 
208,415 32 



340,299 25 



Yearly Expenditure on 
CONSTEUC 

NOVA 



1 






84,000 00 
24,941 44 


11. 




k 2 


do Quarantine Station (Lawlor's 


do 






x S 


Lunenburg Marine Hospital 


Lunenburg 






4 


Pictou Custom House 


Pictou 


25,060 05 






v 5 




do 






^6 


do Quarantine Station 


do 

Cape Breton 


4,090 00 

9,276 57 

16 95 

3 550 00 

3,332 12 






s 7 


Sydney Marine Hospital 


227 
232 


662 71 


8 




do 




q 


Yarmouth Marine Hospital 


Yarmouth 






10 


do Quarantine Station 


do 








Totals 










154,267 13 


662 71 











PRINCE EDWARD 



1 
* 2 
v 3 



Charlottetown Dominion Building 

do Marine Hospital 

Souris Marine Hospital 



Totals. 



Queen's 

do 
King's .. 



69,000 00 



4,385 62 



73,385 62 



84 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 
ON CANALS. — Maintenance, &c. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


o 

a 




$ cts. 


II. 

248 
254 
255 


$ cts. 
3,765 28 


II. 

283 


$ cts. 
2,390 74 


II. 

301 


$ cts. 
2,459 09 


$ cts. 
55,751 16 


i 








on STAFF, REPAIRS, &c. 




631 50 
142,101 48 
192,669 08 




400 00 

141,474 28 

233,863 99 

3,765 28 




959 58 

169,773 61 

210,839 42 

2,390 74 





2,121 17 
180,887 36 
261,501 52 

2,459 09 


23,771 21 
2,095,077 47 
3,064,657 83 

55,751 16 


i 

2 













335,402 06 




379,503 55 




383,963 35 




446,969 14 


5,239,257 67 




PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 
TION. 

SCOTIA. 








II. 




II. 




II. 

253 

253 
253 


363 37 

327 70 
2,833 30 


II. 




84,363 37 

25,269 14 
6,502 25 

25,060 05 
1,613 00 
4,090 00 

9,939 28 

284 27 
3,550 00 
3,438 64 


1 














? 


248 


77 31 


232 


3,541 64 














4 














256 


1,613 00 


5 














6 

7 










253 


30 50 


256 


236 82 


S 










9 






249 


106 52 










10 










77 31 




3,648 16 




3,604 87 




1,849 82 


164,110 00 




ISLAND. 
















II. 




II. 




69,000 00 
1,868 06 
4,385 62 


1 










253 


1,800 Of 


260 


68 06 


2 
3 






























1,800 00 




68 06 


75,253 68 

















85 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

CONSTftUC 

NEW 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




Si 

a 
si 


1848. 


1 


Chathem Custom House 

do Post Office 


Northumberland 


$ cts. 
12,991 77 


II. 


$ cts. 


9 


do 






3 

4 


Dorchester Penitentiary 


Westmorland 

York 


42,154 22 


226 


64,045 07 


^ 5 


Middle Island or Miramichi Quaran- 
tine Station 

Newcastle Custom House 




4,173 70 

4,830 00 

5,588 44 

330 00 

75,797 88 






6 


do 






v 7 










8 




do 






9 


St. John Custom House (old) 

do do (new) 

do Marine Hospital, Partridge Fid 

do Military Storehouse, &c 

do Post Office (old) 


St. John City 






10 


do 


226 


18,832 02 


s 11 


do 




1? 


do 




226 


7,405 99 


13 


do 


178,940 86 


14 


do do (new) 


do 


226 


7,895 45 


. 15 


do Quarantine Station, Partridge 

Island 

do Savings Bank (old) 


do 


7,308 46 
47,784 28 


16 


do 






17 


do do (new) 

Sussex Post Office, Custom House, &c 
Westcock Marine Hospital 


do 


226 


470 64 


18 


King's 






19 


Westmorland 


3,416 93 






?0 


Woodstock Post Office, Custom House 
Totals 


















333,316 54 




98,649 17 



















QUE 


1 


Argenteuil Court House 


Argenteuil 


1,377 20 
178 66 






7 


Beauharnois Gaol 


Beauharnois 






;; 


Chicoutimi Marine Hospital 


Chicoutimi 






4 


Grosse Isle Quarantine Station 

Hull Post Office 1. ... 


Montmagny 


34,785 01 


226 
232 


4,942 50 


r ; 






r> 


Kamoura&ka Gaol 

Levis Fortifications 




61 80 






7 








fl 


do Immigrant Shed 


do 


20,468 20 

228 50 

219,610 76 

185,276 07 

17,811 15 






9 


Malbaie Court House and Gaol 

Montreal Custom House 






10 








11 


do Examining Warehouse 

do Immigrant Shed 


do 


225 


18,533 75 


l? 


do 


13 


do Inland Revenue Offices 

do Post Office 

do Purchase of Land 


do 






14 

If. 


do 

do 


460,426 38 
105,724 56 


225 


30,166 98 


16 


Quebec Artillery Barracks 








17 


do Cartridge Factory... 


do 










Carried forward 












1,045,948 29 




53,643 23 









86 



40 Victcri: 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
RON— Continued. 

BRUNSWICK. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


18S0 


1881. 


1882. 


a 


11. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

12,991 77 
790 00 

326,085 81 
30,521 57 

4,173 70 

4,830 00 

5,588 44 

330 00 

75,797 88 

316,779 89 

2,233 93 

9,480 87 

178,940 86 

168,361 06 

7,308 46 
47,784 28 

45,022 03 
1,918 30 
3,416 93 
6,316 22 


1 


248 


790 00 

63,734 72 
1,971 28 














r > 


249 
247 


233 
235 
231 


27,251 93 
19,358 88 


262 
251 


73,274 17 
6,070 64 


25- 
257 


55,625 70 
3,120 77 


3 
4 

5 


















6 


















7 


















R 


















9 


247 


54,230 97 


231 


160,478 08 


249 

253 

253 


58,415 77 
1,372 50 


257 

258 
259 


24,823 05 

861 43 
2,000 00 


10 
11 


947 


74 88 






1«j» 












13 


247 


29,702 19 


231 


53,799 09 


250 


47,477 71 


259 


29,436 62 


14 
15 


















16 


247 


36,281 54 


231 


5,373 13 


251 
253 


2,896 72 






17 








1 R 














l c ^ 


















?io 















186,785 53 


266,261 11 




194,143 51 


119,516 09 


1,243.672 00 : 





















1,377 20 
178 66 

1,049 91 

56,703 24 

793 59 

61 80 

13,175 30 

20,463 20 

228 50 

223,681 76 

225.430 75 

17,811 15 

10,353 87 

490,593 36 

105,724 56 

4,659 81 
12,018 76 


1 


















?, 






233 
239 


301 76 






255 

252 
255 


743 15 

14,421 60 
793 59 


3 






245 


2,554 13 


4 










R 














B 






229 


6,624 08 


246 


2,720 14 


252 

256 
253 


3,831 08 

""4,071 00 
2,447 72 


7 






3 
9 

10 


246 


8,463 25 


230 


10,130 17 


248 


576 79 


11 














253 


10,353 87 


13 














14 


















15 










247 


1,649 74 


271 
294 
294 


3,010 07 
12,018 76 


TP. 










17 



















8,466 25 




17,056 01 




7,500 80 




51,695 84 


1,184,310 42 





87 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18S3 



Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS* 

CONSTKUO 1 ' 

QUEBEC- 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




.a 

a 


1878. 

• 








$ cts. 
1,045,948 29 


."•J 


$ cta.j] 
53,643 23 J 


18 


Quebec Citadel 

do do "Cliff" 


Quebec City 


19 


do 








20 


do do Buildings 


do 








21 




do 


1,331 60 






22 


do Durham Terrace Extension... 
do Fortifications 


do 






23 


do 








v 24 




do 


9,008 35 
2,687 -25 
8,767 76 
105,088 49 
1,334 40 
6,833 63 






25 


do New Gaol 


do 






26 


do Observatory (rebuilding) 

do Post Office 


do" 

do 






27 






28 


Sherbrooke Immigrant Station 


Sherbrooke 






29 


do New Gaol 


do 

do 






30 


do Post Office 






31 


St. Helen's Island Military Buildings 
St. John's Post Office.. 


Montreal City 








32 


St. John 




226 
228 


1,714 281 
7,281 961 


33 


St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary 

Three Rivers Custom House 




122,531 54 
10,534 68 


34 




35 


do Old Barracks 


do 








Totals, Quebec 












1,314,065 90 




62,639 47 f 








ONTAf 


1 


Algoma Court House and Jail 




5,041 13 






2 


Belleville Post Office, Custom 
House, &c. ... 
Brantford do do ... 
Brockville do do 
Chatham do do 
Cornwall do do ... 

Guelph do do 
Hamilton Immigrant Shed 








q 










4 










B 


Kent 








£ 










1 


South Wellington . 


13,111 74 


223 


13,788 26 j 


c 


do Post Office 


do .. 


17,508 67 






1( 


> do do Custom House 
&c. (new) 

Kingston Fortifications and Military 


do 






11 




101,723 15 
4,024 08 






15 


I do Immigrant Buildings 


do 






i; 


1 do Military College 


do 


20,483 98 


22^ 
23] 


43,591 61 


l< 




do 
















161,892 75 


67,379 87 









88 



16 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 18S3 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
HON —Continued. 

Concluded. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


a 


II. 


$ cts. 
8,465 25 


II. 


$ cts. 
17,056 01 


II. 

247 
247 


$ cts. 
7,500 80 

2,831 00 
(a) 26,727 54 


II. 

254 
254 
254 
255 
253 
255 
253 


$ cts. 
51,695 84 

9,745 13 

10,377 61 

6,428 60 

3,574 00 

18,529 11 
18,017 59 


$ cts. 
1,184,310 42 

12,576 13 

37,105 15 

6,428 60 

5,532 48 

34,717 01 

99,272 16 

11,047 25 

2,687 25 

8,767 76 

105,088 40 

1,334 40 

6,833 63 

14,394 84 

144 63 

15,479 84 

183,207 13 
10,534 68 

8,240 70, 


18 










19 










?,o 










247 

246 

246 
247 


626 88 

14,101 50 

(6) 37,094 56 

2,038 90 


V 






229 
229 


2,086 40 
44,160 01 


M 






r: 






714 






• 








915 


















"!,■ 


















27 
28 


















<,<; 










248 


8,588 75 


253 
255 
294 

272 

254 


5,806 09 

144 63 

1,525 00 

16,575 16 


3(1 










3] 


24>] 
255 

249 


4,075 00 
11,698 84 


230 
233 
234 


4,391 33 
9,€82 18 


248 
249 


3,774 23 
15,437 45 


32 

33 

3 I 










247 
263 


3,138 34 


253 


5,102 36 


3§ 


— ~" 










24,240 09 




77,375 93 


121,859 95 


147,521 12 


1,747,702 46 





















5,041 13 

17,486 95 

32,772 48 

3,090 00 

8,137 88 

8,233 97 

31,641 82 

1,450 00 

17,508 67 

37,966 89 

111,480 79 
4,024 08 

102,056 30 
88,743 25 











242 
244 


5,637 31 
10,557 94 


247 
249 
251 
250 
249 


11,849 64 
1,086 00 
3,090 00 
8,137 88 
8,233 97 


245 


9,116 91 


229 


12,011 63 


























244 
254 


4,741 82 




















251 


1,450 00 






















244 
243 


25 19 

6,706 24 


251 


37,941 7® 






228 


3,051 40 










245 
250 


. 23,404 27 
10,906 43 


228 
234 


3,900 00 
5,387 18 


242 
245 
243 


6,016 41 
14,109 11 


248 
294 

248 


4,660 03 
8,340 53 




48,169 43 




24,350 21 




43,052 20 




84,789 75 


419,634 21 



(a) Including $2,500 grant Corporation City of Quebec. 
X*0 do $2,433.33, Her Majesty the Queen's gift. 

89 



10 



4.G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 18? 


Yearly Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINC 

CONSTRT 

ONTARIO 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




2 

to 


1878. 








$ cts. 
161,892 75 

53,583 46 
7,425 86 


II. 


57,379 


15 




London City 


16 




do 

do 






17 




224 


1,928 


18 


do Post Office 


do 


6,768 17 


19 


Ottawa Drill Shed 


Ottawa City 


^0 




do 








21 


do Parliament and Depart- 


do 


1,161,799 44 
230,829 07 


199 

225 
230 


170,120 
6,971 


22 


do Post Office 


do 


OQ 




do 


24 


Point Edward Cattle Quarantine 


West Lambton 








25 




Russell 


155,965 74 
2,000 00 






?6 


St. Catharine3 Marine Hospital 

do Post Office, Custom 

House, &c. 

St. Thomas do do 

Stratford do do ... 

Toronto Custom House 


Lincoln and Niagara 

do 






27 






°8 


East Elgin 








29i 


North Perth 








30 


Toronto City 

do 


234,184 30 

223,338 70 

11,834 18 

128,458 20 






3] 


do Examining Warehouse 


223 


376 i 


32 


do 


T-\ 


do Post Office 


do 


224 
230 


2§,195§K 


34 


Windsor Post Office, Custom House, 
&c 


North Essex 




Totals 












2,378,079 87 




256,97lH 































M 


1 


Brandon Immigrant Shed 

Emerson do 


Brandon City 








? 


Provencher...... 








3 


Stoney Mountain Penitentiary.... 


Lisgar 


136,191 74 






4 


Winnipeg Assist. Receiver-General's 
Office 


Winnipeg City 






5 


Winnipeg — Custom House 


do 


38,642 88 

15,649 77 

7,050 58 






6 


do Dominion Lands Office... 
do Immigrant Shed 


do 








7 


do 


8 


do Lt.-Governor'sResidence 

do Parliament Buildings 

do Post Office 


do 






9 


do 








10 


do 


25,195 64 








Totals 










222,730 61 




















90 









Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 18S3 



the undermentioned years — Continued. 

N — Continued. 

luded. 



Year ended 30th June. 






Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


83 
X. 

a 


% cts. 
48,169 43 


1 IL 


% cts. 
24,350 21 


II. 


$ cts. 
43,052 20 


II. 


$ cts. 
84,789 75 


$ cts 
419,634 21 

53,583 46 
7,425 86 
1,928 33 
6,768 17 

26,981 43 

50,741 80 

1,454,996 11 

242,856 73 

13,979 70 

1,577 10 

155,965 74 

2,000 00 

17,777 69 

7,331 37 

7,213 37 

235,713 30 

223,715 15 

11,834 18 

148,653 25 

66,868 35 


i r > 
















i« 
















17 
















18 


(a) 
! 4,050 00 

I 77,179 34 
13 77 


228 

229 

217 


(6) 
19,161 54 

1,428 17 
8,730 50 


242 
244 
259 

230 
242 
259 


3,442 73 
39,240 51 

12,231 86 

5,042 C6 

7 53 


247 

252 

234 
235 


327 16 

10,073 12 

24,934 96 


10 

20 

21 






234 
252 

247 


13,972 17 
1,577 10 


9^ 








?4 












?5 
















?fi 








243 


6,090 35 


249 
251 

250 


11,687 34 
7,331 37 
7,213 37 


n 








?8 












?9 


1,529 00 










30 
37 
















3^ 
















W 


18.512 30 


229 


22,129 07 


245 


19,522 61 


249 


6,704 37 


34 


149,453 84 




75,799 49 




128,629 85 


168,610 71 


3,157,545 30 





IA. 













262 
261 
274 
261 

262 


9,934 20 

1,186 ]0 
16,829 26 

5,025 00 


9,934 20 

1,186 10 
169,377 85 

5,025 00 

38,642 88 

15,649 77 

1 27,755 45 

6,412 87 
19,561 83 
32,701 52 


1 












71 


78 50 


234 


5,963 63 


253 


10,314 72 


3 

A 












^ 
















a 








254 
254 
254 


7,461 61 

746 79 

2,543 93 


261 
262 
262 
261 


13,243 26 
5,666 08 

17,017 90 
7,505 88 


7 








R 









9 








10 














78 50 




5,963 63 




21,067 05 




76,407 68 


326,247 47 





(a) Including $2,050 contributed by Corporation of City of Ottawa. 

(b) Including $2,950 do do also $330 paid by Militia 
U'irtment. 

91 



40 


Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 18| 


Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDIfl 

CONSTI 

NORTHS 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




s 


1878. 


1 


Battleford Buildings 


Saskatchewan Territory.. 


$ cts. 

63,412 12 
63,287 85 

15,000 00 


II. 
237 


$ 

68, 09 


2 




3 


Buildings at Forts McLeod, Walsh, 
Calgarry, Saskatchewan, Tail 
Creek, Qu'Appelle and Shoal Lake 

Totals 














68, Oi 




141,699 97 








BR) 


1 


Nanaimo Post Office 


Vancouver 








2 


New Westminster Penitentiary 

do Post Office 




127,041 60 


228 


23,tH 


S 


do 


4 


VictoriaCustom House,Post Office, &c 


Victoria City 

do 


64,344 94 
18,635 43 






n 








Totals 










210,021 97 




23,01 








PUBLIC BUILI 


1 


Public Buildings Generally 




39,928 16 


227 
230 


8,8 








Abstract Statement of Expenditurjl 


i 


Nova Scotia 




154,267 13 

73,385 62 

383,316 54 

1,314,065 90 

2,378,079 87 

222,730 61 

141,699 97 

210,021 97 

39,928 16 






? 


Prince Edward Island 




3 


New Brunswick 






98, CI 1 

62,# 

256,S|#4 


4 


Quebec 




fi 


Ontario 




6 


Manitoba - 




7 


N orth-West Territories 






68, ( i 
23/ - 

•V ! 


8 


British Columbia 




q 


Generally 






Totals 






4,917,495 77 




518,1 












92 









( Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



i he undermentioned years — Continued. 
|3Sj— Concluded. 

[htories. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




\ 1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


o 

S 
5 
25 


$ cts. 


II. 
232 


$ cts. 
3,737 92 


II. 
255 


% cts. 
11,578 16 


II. 
263 


% cts. 
3,025 91 


$ cts. 

149,847 55 
63,287 85 

15,000 00 


1 




?, 
















3 






3 ; 737 92 


11,578 16 




3,025 91 


228,135 40 











iJMBIA. 





"234 


" 12800" 


"255 


""5,'678"9b" 


263 
263 
263 
263 


25 33 

6,781 17 

848 57 

4,430 70 


25 33 

162,635 14 

848 57 

78,329 51 

18,635 43 














255 


9,553 87 










f 






















128 00 


15,232 77 




12,085 77 


260,473 98 











I2RALLY. 



13,474 44 



234 



12,430 02 



255 



14,966 15 



263 



14,947 57 



104.633 33 1 



ILIC BUILDINGS— Construction. 



77 31 




3,648 16 




3,601 87 

1,800 00 

194,143 51 

121,859 95 

128,629 85 

21,067 05 

11,578 16 

15,232 77 

. 14,966 15 




1,849 82 

68 06 

119,516 09 

147,521 12 

168,610 71 

76.407 68 

3,025 91 

12,085 77 

14,947 57 


164,110 00 

75,253 68 

1,248,672 00 

1,747,702 46 

3,157,545 30 

326,247 47 

228,135 40 

260,473 98 

104,633 33 




186,785 58 

24,240 09 

149,453 84 

78 50 




266,261 11 

77,375 93 

75,799 49 

5,963 63 

3,737 92 

128 00 

12,430 02 




1 
1 






\ 


13,474 44 




< 


... 374,109 76 




445,344 26 


512,882 31 




544,032 73 


7,312,773 62 





. 



9:h 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No, 


10.) 




A. 18* 




Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDING 

m 


■ 




Name of "Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

• 1877. 






o 

■xa 

a 


1878. 




i 






Halifax City 


$> cts. 

44,242 02 
164 00 
308 97 

1,766 20 


II. 

232 
232 
232 

232 


$ c 

2,854 
93 
50 

114 




do Drill Shed 


do 




3 




do 




4 


do Quarantine Station, Lawlor's 


do 




p; 


Lunenburg Marine Hospital 


Lunenburg 




6 


Pictou 




232 


149 




7 




do 






g 




do 


658 82 
35 00 








9 






232 


255 






Totals 








47,175 01 




3,517 












PRINCE E 


. 


j 


Charlottetown Dominion Building... 
do Drill Shed 


Queen's 


9,926 88 


233 
233 


2,454 
406 




2 


do 




3 


do Marine Hospital 

do Quarantine Station 

Totals 


do 






-i 


do 
























9,926 88 


2,860 












N 




1 


Chatham Custom House 


Northumberland 




233 


256 




«> 


do Post Office 


do 






3 




York. 

do 










.1 


do Custom House. 


612 41 








5 


do Magazine 


do 








6 


do Post Office 


do 










7 


do Public Buildings... 

Middle Island Quarantine Station.... 
Newcastle Custom House. 


do 










8 


Northumberland 










9 


do 


540 00 

396 78 

27,767 60 








10 


St. John Barracks 


St. John City 

do 








11 


do Custom House (old) 


233 


500 




}> 


do do (new) 

do Fort Dufferin, Negro Point, 
do Penitentiary 


do 




13 


do 










14 


do 


522 18 
800 00 


233 
233 


62 
147 




l r i 


do Post Office (old) 


do 

do 




IP. 


do do (new) 




17 


do Public Buildings 


do 

do 










18 


do Public Works Offices 




19 


do Quarantine Station, Part- 
rigde Island 


do 


28 00 
417 82 


233 


41* 




^0 




do 




fll 


do do (new) 

iWestcock Marine Hospital 

Totals 


do 








7 9 


Westmorland ,. 


1,797 44 


















32,882 23 




1,381 
















94 











i Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1S83 



K the undermentioned years — Continued, 



IRS. 

OTIA. 



Year ended 30th June. 



1879. 



$ cts. 
930 30 



20 65 
128 00 



1,078 95 



1880. 



II. 

239 



239 
239 



$ cts. 
7 50 



146 82 
193*23 



347 55 



1881. 



II. 

263 



263 
263 



263 
263 



$ Cts. 
537 20 



410 50 

463 86 

1,075 22 



20 00 



2,506 7i 



1882. 



II. 

256 
273 
273 
273 

273 
273 
273 



$ cts. 

5,869 47 

2,260 67 

990 12 

50 00 
116 00 
905 19 



10,191 45 



Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 



$ cts. 

54,441 29 
2,517 88 
1,760 56 

2,510 92 
116 00 

2,343 77 
128 00 
658 82 
310 07 



64,817 31 



ID ISLAND. 



5 274 89 


239 


799 16 


263 


1,424 47 


260 
273 
273 




4,240 82 
26 25 


19,121 02 

432 25 

252 28 

74 00 


1 



■ 5 Vi'ob" 


239 


252 28 






3 

4 
















348 89 


1,051 44 




1,424 47 




4,267 07 


19,879 55 





UNSWIOK. 



>5 50 00 
)5 837 80 


239 


9 20 


263 


528 63 


273 


307 34 


1,151 76 

837 80 

75 00 

612 41 

133 79 

199 98 

438 74 

32 20 

544 20 

396 78 

28,267 60 

1,442 15 

48 38 

3,458 10 

1,605 08 

1,839 14 

1,338 08 

592 68 

626 95 

417 82 

969 82 

1,797 44 


1 


339 


75 00 










3 










4 








263 


133 79 






5 








273 


199 98 


6 




239 
239 
239 


438 74 

32 20 

4 20 






7 










8 










9 










10 
















11 


)5 500 00 










273 
294 
272 


912 15 

48 38 

1,500 47 


1? 










13 


)5 52 29 
627 03 






263 
263 


1,321 16 
30 25 


14 






15 






273 
272 


1,839 14 
78 60 


16 


"592" 68* 


239 


1,259 48 







17 
18 










273 


180 00 


19 












?0 












272 


969 82 


V 












n 


















2,659 80 




1,818 82 


2,013 83 




6,065 88 


46,825 90 





95 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 1883 








Expenditure 


, on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

EEPAIRS 
QUE 


1 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30tb June, 

1877. 






a 


1878. 




i 


Argenteuil Court House 


Argenteuil 

Quebec 


$ cts. 
600 00 


II. 


$ cts. 




2 










3 


Court House and Jails 


do 


30 00 

310 00 

1,860 13 

900 44 

8 00 

83 67 








4 


Huntingdon i... 








v 5 




Montmagny 


232 


5,387 47 


' 


6 


Industrie Court House and Jail 

He aux Noix Fort Lennox Barracks, &c 


Joliette 

St. John 

Kamouraska 

Lapraide 




7 






8 








9 




233 
225 


250 00 
2,577 31 ! 




10 




Levis 


8,689 69 
198 00 


• 


11 


Montreal Court House 


Citv of Montreal 




12 


do Custom House (old). See In- 
land Revenue Office 
do Custom House'(new) do . 
do Examining Warehouse 


do 








13 


do 


28,560 52 


232 


2,046 26 I 


r 


14 


do 




15 


do Geological Museum 


do 


3,410 ee 

80 00 

7 55 

216 13 








16 


do Governor General's Office.... 
do do {Secretary's Office 

do Government House (old) 

do Immigrant Shed3 

do Inland Revenue Office (for- 
merly old Custom House) 
do Lunatic Asylum 


do 








17 


do 








18 


do 

do 








19 








20 


do 


8,085 96 
71 61 


233 


310 00 I 




21 


do 




22 


do Military Cemetery 


do 








23 


do Post Office (old) 


do 


675 82 








24 


do do (new) 


do 








25 




do 










26 


Quebec Artillery Barracks 


City of Quebec 










27 


do Bonner's property 

do Citadel Buildings 


do 


174 32 

27,757 00 
2,204 61 

1,509 89 
12,896 00 








28 


do 


233 


1,436 91 




?9 


do Culler's Office 


do 




30 


do Custom House (old) now Im- 


do 








31 


do Custom House (new) 


do 


233 


4',906 01 1 




3?, 


do District Military Storehouse... 
do Drill Shed 


do 




33 


do 










34 


do Durham Terrace 


do 


349 20 

29,002 18 

305 00 








35 


do Fortifications 


do 


225 


18,494 44 ; 




36 


do Governor General's Office 

do Gunnery School 

do Inspector of Gas Offices 

do Jail (new), 


do 




37 


do 


233 


577 50 j 




38 


do 

do ,.. 

do 


1,173 49 

193 66 

1,963 66 

6,356 28 




39 








40 


do Leased Building3 








N 41 




do 

do 








4? 


do Military Buildings 

do Observatory 








43 


do 


725 55 
150 00 
368 04 
1,312 73 
4,133 77 
4,422 69 
6,959 93 


233 


317 15 11 




44 


do Old Chateau St. Louis 


do 




45 


do Post Office (old) 


do 








46 




do 








47 


do do (new) , 

do Public Buildings 


do 


233 
233 


2,927 67 1| 
303 48 M 




48 


do 




49 


do Spencerwood 


do 




50 


do Weights and Measures Offices. 
Carried forward 


do 






















157,746 18 




39,564 20 1 
















ye 











46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10 ) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 



— Continued. 
BBC. 





Year en 


ded 30th June. 










Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


4. 

6 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ ets. 

600 00 

893 49 
30 00 

397 89 
18,922 35 

900 44 

159 75 
83 67 

250 00 
13,269 16 

198 00 


1 














292 


893 49 


V 














3 














270 


87 89 


4 


253 


11,524 75 


239 


150 00 






% 










f? 














294 


151 75 


7 














R 
















Q 


246 


2,002 16 














10 














1 1 


















]?, 


253 
252 
253 


52 35 

9,074 51 

18 77 


238 
238 


3,014 24 
1,116 19 


262 
262 


5,389 58 
2,214 82 


271 
272 
272 


7,247 76 

1,473 43 

216 40 


46,310 71 

13,878 98 

3,645 83 

80 00 

7 55 

216 13 

650 69 

8,605 15 
71 61 

590 50 

675 82 

7,532 41 

61 75 

99 74 

174 32 

62,528 62 

2,204 61 

1,509 89 

20,044 38 

110 80 

32 00 

349 20 

97,231 37 

305 00 

577 50 

1,173 49 

193 66 

1,963 66 

12,233 80 

1,747 50 

1,042 70 

150 00 

368 04 

1,312 73 

13,986 00 

5,062 17 

6,959 93 

316 30 


13 
U 
15 










16 


















17 


















18 










262 
262 


75 00 
3 94 


272 


575 69 


19 


253 


69 11 


238 


106 14 


5!0 






?,\ 














272 

294 


590 50 


n 














?,% 






239 


23 00 


262 








24 






271 


99 74 


fl6 














9,7 


253 


9,842 89 


238 


13,825 46 


261 


7,145 01 


271 


2,521 35 


28 

99 


















30 


253 


628 47 


238 


306 10 


261 


698 25 


270 


609 55 


31 








32 00 






S3 










34 


246 


49,734 75 














3<> 














36 


















S7 


















38 


















39 


















40 






238 


992 20 


261 


163 00 


271 


4,722 32 


41 






42 
43 


















44 




■• 














45 


















46 


253 


354 50 


238 


444 94 


261 
261 


4,767 92 
336 00 


270 


1,357 20 


47 

48 














49 










261 


316 30 






ft) 


~ 












85,017 28 




20,331 07 


25,182 07 




28,868 49 


349,709 29 






10a—T 



















'46 \ictoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 1883 


Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

EBPAIRS 

QUEBEC— 






1 Name of Work, 
tip"! r. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




• 


i 


1878. 




i 






$ cts. 
155,746 18 


H. 


$ cts. 
39,564 20 




*>l 


Sheribrooke Immigrant Shed 


Sherbrooke 




5? 


Sorel Court House atifci Jail 


Richelieu 


920 64 

282 00 








ns 


Sfct. Helen's Island Magazine 


City of Montreal 








54 


St. John's Post Office 


St. John 








55 




89 90 

581 88 

76 95 


"233 


476 05 




56 


Tbree Rivers Custom. House 


City of Three Rivers 

do 


! 


57 


do Old Barracks 








Totals 








157,697 55 




40,040 25 












W 8C 6 0NT ^ 




•• i 


...... . ,j. 

Belleville Custom House, &c 4W« 

& da Inland Re^en&e Office....:.: 

Brantford Post Office, &c j... 

GJhatfliam Custom House „....«4.w 

ChieTph Custom House, &c*..*..» »»»;»**» 

Hamilton Custom House }&!> 

Oi doc Post Officers. Ji&. Jtf 

EHsg&on Custom House,.,.,, ...,..,< 

u. giia ? | ec *?'*,! IP 

&! do Fortifications, and JVIilita.Fy. 

ti 6t Buildinjgt.\. ill :.U 

»{ 4bi Immigrant .Shed.„«^«v,j.iv 

E< <S6i, 2c Penitentiary. .*.iUJ. .,.1 

f dOlf Post Office., ..„...,.„ 

do Public Buildings 


West Hastings 










? 


do 










3 


South Brant 










:.'4 


Kent 










[£5 

«6 


South Wellington 

City of Hamilton 


3,568 66 
1,109 74 
5,837 61 


231 
231 
231 

231 
231 
231 
231 


208 89 ' 
1,363 81 

256 44 { 

20,694 61 
45 31 




:-'7 


i >><■■, do 




?;£9 


City- of Kingston 

; ! >: o 

., v T at 

i do. 


I 


If) 


..;|... »do«. 


248 22 

12,696 27 

3,977 09 




Tl 


1 •• 10 cte> ' 


4,778 52 
89 34 


i«ri 


. .... do 


33 


do 






'm 


tS£ <l0c . Rockwood Asylum,. .*,.».]*•.• 

Iforatotfl Custom BoMeiiill Iftt 

0E do f Drill Shed;...™. .,„..,.,.., *, 

W dH Immigrant Shed..,.,..,. ...*• 

OJ ttel Post Office^-,,.,...,**.,.,...,,...,, 
2* d&I, 'Public Buildings*,..... — J*v 
NfiaU^ra Military Buildings. ...... -...v.* 

Oitaifea Drill Shed'-.., ,...,„„ 

Qi do\ Geological Museum,,,,.... ...w 

»< dct:J Major's Hill — ..„,„„...... 

Bi dtt»i Parlt. & Dept'l.. Buildings..,,. 
01 da;: do "Damage by fire 
• do' do »G«to^ ,'.' 


•do • ••»- 

CitjiioMrondon . 

• do v 

db ...i 


23 90 

1,112 25 

600 00 








231 


4,061 26 


1 


RB? 








*£8 
19 

an 


• -do- ...... 

,. . ., . do- •• .....v.. 

•Lincoln and- Niagara 


3,086 78 


231 


47 00J 




■■?i 


•City of Ottawa ....... ... .... 










i fl2 


.. ...do- it........ 










.23 


do 

do-" •.■....•.itkv..wi 

d& ..> ft! 


534 67 
582,550 45 








•;24 
25 


229 


90,710 0£f 




26 


d#M #1 

dO 414. ..444 


36,323 20 


235 


"20,519 oil 




27 


, , 

do. do Grounds.. 




r28 
29 
30 


M dOH do Heating.,...,...,. 

do do Remo'lofSnow 

do do- >Tete£honic Ser- 

'» '. •»vice,....,, 


do- .v.. .4. ...... 4. 

do ......v.,-....** 


332,601 33 
8,582 27 

■ 

11,820 23 


234 
234 


'" 35,006* (iii 
469 <K { 


1 


■31 


Bf.te.i do" Ventilation- 
(Improvem't) 


do ...... ft 






(3 I. • '< Carried f<frlfttf&M& 


i'j. , 4......V. 4 


1,004,672 67 




178,249 3< 





46 


Victoria. 




Sessional 


Papers (No. 


10) 


A. 1883 


for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
— Continued. 

Concluded, 


Year ended 30th June. 


Total 
for 15 Years 

to 

30th June, 

1882. 




\ 

1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


m 

a 


i n. 


$ cts. 
85,017 28 


II. 


$ cts. 
20,331 07^ 


II. 


$ cts. 
25,182 07 


II. 
272 


$ cts. 
23,868 49 

400 00 


$ cts. 
349,709 29 

400 00 
920 64 
392 50 
76 00 
164 90 
1,285 82 
358 90 


ft 














f& 










262 


110 50 






33 


272 
272 


76 00 
75 00 


54- 














^ 






239 
239 


1 90 
281 95 


262 


225 99 


56 






*>7 
















85,017 28 




20,614 92 




25,518 56 




24,419 49 


353,308 05 




RIO. 














270 
270 
270 
270 
270 
270 
27u 
269 

248 
294 


211 00 
118 85 
1,399 72 
3 78 
333 95 
569 50 
205 56 
162 30 

9,919 78 


211 00 

118 85 

1,775 22 

3 73 

639 13 

5,101 37 

3,588 56 

6,586 55 

50,984 18 

319 04 

17,474 79 

5,856 48 

122 20 

23 90 

7,338 10 

600 00 

171 85 

5,221 22 

49 00 

1,550 45 

1,727 28 

5,834 97 

534 67 

1,051,875 29 

10,974 41 

127,230 90 

* d Wol9 

ITS OFEKSP- 
IT PUBUtfBftSN 
jy pi ^^tynrai 


1 














?, 










260 


375 50 


3 










4 






237 
237 
237 
237 


6 50 

7 00 
175 57 

4 95 


260 
260 
260 
260 


298 68 
747 32 
635 26 
292 34 


^ 






<g 


254 
254 

245 


98 62 
32 91 

20,369 79 
22 01 


7 

8 

9 


245 


237 


3 50 






10 












17 


254 


98 21 


237 


' 500 50 


260 
260 


657 68 
122 20 


269 


533 66 


12 
13 










269 




14 




72 81 


237 


262 89 


260 


449 15 


1,379 74 


15 




96 85 

150 30 

49 00 










270 
270 


75 00 
317 34 


1 7 


254 


237 


7 00 


260 


1,612 80 


18 
19 








260 
259 


913 20 

1,727 28 


269 


637 25 


?,0 










21 






237 

"235 
249 
241 


56 20 

""l03,06T52 
10,974 41 
21,849 00 


268 
*267 


5,778 77 
'" 97,428 58* 
*"l9 J 5l7"7b" 

4IPMI' 

DVERflMBP 

9,998 96 


22 


251 



106,643' 62* 


259 


"71**478 07 


23 
24 
25 


256 


11,259 00 


256 
256 
259 
257 
256 


17,763 00 

5,260 01 

36,038 25 

448 11 


264 
264 
268 
265 
264 

205 

250 


26 
27 


255 
251 


35,102 47 
959 81 


240 
240 


29,230 78 
595 29 


28 
29 

30 






247 


4,202 10 






SI 








174,955 40 




170,940 21 




138,818 85 




197,125 28 
















99 




\0[tav 


iansts/ 





10 a— 1^ 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1889 



Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

EEPAIRS 













ONTARIO-i 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




s 


1878. 








$ cts. 
1,004,672 67 

767 33 


II. 


$ cts. J 1 

178,249 30 1 J 


ffi 


Ottawa Post Office (old) 


City of Ottawa 

do 


-H 








34 


do Public Buildings, Post Office, 
Rideau Hall, &c 


do 


4,500 00 
500 00 


230 


6,750 00 jl 


35 


do SupremeCourt(rent of rooms) 
do do (formerly work-shops) 

Port Colborne Custom House 

Port Robinson's Inland Rev. Offices. 


do 


3fi 


do 






37 


Welland 






:::::::::;;■ 


' J ,R 


do 






::::::. :::| 


39 


South Grenville 




231 
230 
234 

235 
234 
230 


564 30 H 


•10 


Rideau Hall 

do allowance for Fuel and 
Light 


Russell 


250,528 12 

20,000 00 
3,430 30 


39,301 46l 

5,000 00 11 
310 00 r 


41 


do 


49 




do 


4 3 






120 oo! 


44 


Toronto Custom House (temporary). 


City of Toronto 


2,538 98 




4 s ) 


do 


231 


429 52ffc 


4 8 


do Drill Shed 

do ' Examining Warehouse 

do Forts (old and new) 


do 




fl 


4 7 


do 

do 


196 75 
2,122 39 

267 55 

1,778 43 

25,067 23 






48 


231 


.... 

1,197 80 ft 


49 


do Government Building 


do 


fW) 




do 

do 


221 
231 


264 33! 
82 3t { 


si 


do Inland Revenue Offices 

do Military Buildings 

do do Cemetery 


5? 


do 


W 


do .... 








f>4 


do Post Office (old) 


do 

do 

do 

do 


1,032 93 

838 95 

59 09 






r » r > 


do do (new) 






56 








o7 


do Receiver General's Office.... 






*»« 


do 


253 00 
364 25 






5f) 


do Upper CanadaBankBuildi'g 
Windsor Post Office, &c 


do 






60 


North Essex 








Totals 












1,318,912 97 




232,-69 0(i&: 





















MAI 


1 


Emerson Po3t Office, &c 


Provencher 








2 


Stoney Mountain Penitentiary 


Lisgar ; 




234 


604 8'! 


R 


Winnipeg Architect's Office 


City of Winnipeg., 






4 


do Assistant Receiver-Gene- 
ral's Office 


do 


1,200 00 






R 


do Clerk of Works Office 

do Custom House 


do 






6 


do 


1,422 16 

778 08 

2,756 50 

41 27 

22,125 19 
305 18 


233 


' "1,037 8« 


7 




do 


8 


do Fort Osborne Barracks 

do Immigrant, tJuiMings 

do Xieut. -Governor's Resi- 
4 dentfb - <rqrtal) ; . 


do 






<< 


do 






10 


do 






11 


do 






1? 


do Public Buildings 

Totals 


do 


















28,628 38 


1,642 d 














100 









46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188S 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

i- 



— Continued, 

Concluded. 






















Tear 


ended 30th June. 








Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 
30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


0> 


11. 


$ cts. 
174,955 40 


II. 


$ cts. 
170,940 21 


II. 


% cts. 
138,818 85 


II. 


$ cts. 
197,125 28 


% cts. 
1,864,761 71 

767 33 
2,100 84 

49,683 25 

500 00 

801 92 

10 00 

69 53 

4,426 92 

445,405 78 

55,012 10 

5,684 76 

125 00 

2,538 98 

4,386 11 

124 15 

12,507 89 

4,360 14 

267 55 

3,682 54 

26,456 11 

24 00 

5 00 

1,032 93 

9,206 79 

1,267 39 

2 70 

253 CO 

364 25 

1,229 74 


32 


251 

251 


253 45 
9,000 00 


237 
237 


1,647 39 
9,000 00 


259 
256 


200 00 
9,000 00 






33 


264 
"268 


11,433 25 
"wi'di 


34 
35 
3fi 


234 


10 00 










37 






260 
260 

257 

256 
256 


69 53 
446 50 

15,439 50 

9,012 10 
473 11 






3S 


254 

252 

256 
256 
254 


1,622 75 

56,490 27 

5,000 00 

486 05 

5 00 


237 

236 

241 
240 


1,393 50 

61,391 91 

8,000 00 
560 29 


269 

265 

264 
264 


399 87 

22,254 52 

8,000 00 
425 01 


39 

40 

41 
42 

4'-: 














44 


253 


39 38 


237 


384 27 


259 
259 
259 


935 53 

124 15 

1,434 61 


268 


2,597 41 


45 

46 


253 
254 


375 28 
1,034 95 


237 
237 


854 32 
5 00 


269 


9,646 93 


47 
4? 










49 


254 
254 


138 60 
374 41 


23^ 
237 


405 00 
52 34 


259 


135 00 


268 
269 
250 


966 18 

879 78 

24 00 


50 
51 






57 






237 


5 00 






53 


251 












54 


149 CO 


237 


705 65 


259 


191 69 


268 
268 


161 96 

2 70 


55 

5C 
57 














58 


















59 














270 


1,229 74 


60 




250,162 53 




259,711 42 




177,255 49 




258,746 89 


2,497,058 41 





'OBA. 















274 
273 
273 


79 10 
153 67 

583 15 


79 10 

4,994 01 

875 40 

1,200 00 
206 00 

5,233 82 
778 08 

4,713 53 
59 42 

34,125 19 
305 18 
624 43 


1 






240 


3,144 99 


263 
264 


1,090 55 
292 25 


•"'■ 






3 

4 










264 
264 


206 00 
1,182 65 


"2V3 


"*1, 298 "2b" 


1 


255 


166 00 


239 


127 00 


6 


255 


183 00 


239 


110 00 
18 15 

8,000 00 


264 


190 00 


294 


1,474 03 

4 


8 

fl 






239 


263 


4,000 00 






m 


I 








11 






239 


579 43 


264 


45 00 






13 








319 00 


11,979 57 




7,006 45 




3,588 15 


53,194 16 





101 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

EEPAIRS 



NORTH-WEST 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




o 

a 

s 


1878. 


1 


Battleford Buildings 




$ cts. 
100 00 


II. 


$ cts. 













BRITISH 



1 




Yale 




234 


10 00 


? 


New Westminster Custom House 

do Government House 
do Indian Commis- 
sioner's Office.... 
do Penitentiary ......... 


New Westminster 


844 50 




3 


do 






4 


do 




234 


500 00 


', 


do 






fi 


do Post Office 


do 


75 00 
225 00 






7 


do Public Buildings... 
Victoria Custom House, &c 


do ,... 


234 


154 50 


R 


Victoria 







do Marine Hospital 


do 

do 

do 


24 00 
2,138 15 
2,099 88 






10 


do Post Office 






•1 


do Public Buildings 




T> 


do Savings Bank 


do , 








Totals 












5,406 53 




C64 50 
















PUBLIC BUILDINGS 



Public Buildings, Generally. 



655 00 







Abstract Statement of Expenditure 


1 


Nova Scotia 




47,175 01 

9,926 88 

32,882 23 

157,697 55 

], 318,912 97 

28,628 38 

100 00 

5,406 53 

655 00 




3,517 5T 
2,860 80 ' 
1,385 34 
40,040 25- ( 
232,269 06- 
1,642 61. 


2 
3 


Prince Edward Island 

New Brunswick 




4 


Quebec 






Ontario 




6 


Manitoba 




7 


North-West Territories 

British Columbia 




R 




664 '50" 


9 


Generally 






Totals 










1,601,384 55 


282,380 13 1 





















102 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1888 



for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 

—Concluded, 
TERRITORIES. 



Year ended 30th June. 



1879. 



II. 

2551 



$ cts. 
6,118 65 



1880. 



II. 

240 



$ cts. 
590 00 



1881. 



II. 



$ cts. 



1882. 



II. 



cts. 



Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 



% cts. 
6,808 65 



IOLUMBIA. 



















!0 00 

879 12 

1,505 78 

500 00 

3,125 40 

75 00 

379 50 

129 82 
1,187 00 
2,322 84 
3,669 23 

267 52 


j 










264 


34 62 






2 


?[>5 


1,505 78 










3 
















4 


?50 


3,021 04 










274 


104 36 


5 












8 


















7 






232 


42 00 


264 


27 82 


274 
274 
274 
274 
274 


60 00 
1,163 00 

157 37 

158 00 
267 52 


8 






c> 










264 
264 


27 32 
160 00 


10 


248 


815 50 


232 


435 85 


11 
1^ 


















5,342 32 


477 85 




249 76 




1,910 25 


14,051 21 





GENERALLY. 



240 



12 05 



667 05 1 



n PUBLIC BUILDINOS— Repairs. 



.... 



1,078 95 

348 89 
2,659 8 ) 

85,017 28 

250,162 58 

349 00 
6,118 65 
6,342 32 



351,077 47 



347 55 

1,051 44 

1,818 82 

20,614 92 

259,711 42 

11,979 57 

590 00 

477 85 

12 05 



296,603 62 



2,506 78 
1,424 47 
2,013 83 
25,518 56 
177,255 49 
7,006 45 



249 76 



215,975 34 



10,191 45 
4,267 07 
6,065 88 

24,419 49 

258,746 89 

3,588 15 



1,910 25 



309,189 18 



64,817 31 

19,879 55 

46,825 90 

353,308 05 

2,497,058 41 

53,194 16- 

6,808 65. 

14,051 21 

667 (5 



3,056,610 29 



103 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on HARBOURS and BREAK 

NOVA 



Name of Work, 



Arichat West. 
Arisaig. Pier.., 
Aronport 



Bayfield Harbour 

Belleveau Core 

Benacadie Pond 

Big Pond 

BigTracadie 

Broad Cove 

Burying Island, Canso Harbour. 

Canada Creek 

Canning 

Cape St. Mary 

Cheverie 

Cbipman's Brook 

Church Point 



Cow Bay 

Cranberry Head. 

Delap's Cove 



Digby Pier. 



Gabarus 

Green Cove 

Hampton 

Harbourville 

Harbours Generally., 
Indian Island Beach. 



Ingonish, South 

Joggins 

Jordan Bay 

L'Ardoise 

Lingan 

Little Harbour 

Liverpool, Brooklyn. 



Mabou Harbour 

Main a Dieu Breakwater 

Maitland Pier 

Margaree Pier 

Margaretville Pier , 

Merigomish Pier 

Meteghan Cove Breakwater, 
do River do 



Morden Pier 

Musquodoboit Pier. 
McNair's Cove , 



Carried forward. 



County. 



Annapolis Harbour Annapolis.. 

Antigonish Antigonish 



Richmond ., 
Antigonish 
Kings 



Antigonish . 

Digby 

Cape Breton 

do 
Antigonish .. 
Lunenburg . 
Gu^sboro' ... 

Kings 

do 

Digby 

Hants 

Kings , 

Digby 



Cape Breton. 
Yarmouth .. 



Annapolis , 



Digby. 



Cape Breton. 
Yarmouth .... 
Annapolis .... 
Kings 



Cape Breton. 



Victoria 

Cumberland . 

Shelburne 

Richmond.... 
Cape Breton. 
Lunenburg .. 
Queen's...- 



Inverness 

Cape Breton. 

Hants 

Inverness 

Annapolis.... 

Pictou 

Digby 

do 



Kings 

Halifax 

Antigonish, 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



2,283 00 



2,500 00 

13,564 37 

3,000 00 



2,000 00 



2,338 88 
2,750 00 
2,000 00 

90,120 04 
2,000 00 



2,000 00 
2,500 00 



2,000 00 



84,397 20 
10,000 00 
22,568 79 
10,325 50 
2,000 00 



58,320 77 



83,440 15 



6,341 99 
3,000 00 
8,650 00 



10,000 00 
4,500 00 

3,000 00 

1,000 00 

28,564 45 



472,235 14 



1878. 



II. 



237 



237 



237 



237 



237 
238 



239 



237 



176 
239 



237 



237 
240 



237 



104 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



WATERS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

300TIA. 





Year ended 30th June. 






Total 
for 15 Years 

to 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


0> 

a 

= 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 
270 


$ GtS. 

750 00 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts 

750 00 
3,649 15 

9,694 29 

2,583 00 
500 00 

4,888 28 

3,000 00 

716 20 

2,500 00 

13,564 37 

3,000 00 

9,000 00 

5.000 00 

'500 00 

2,000 00 

2,338 88 

2,750 00 

2,000 00 

127,444 10 
3,500 03 

2,150 00 

10,326 30 

3,175 00 
4,500 00 
4.572 37 
2,000 00 
4,908 21 
2,196 45 

86,703 70 
10,000 00 
24,746 12 
10,330 00 
3,978 14 
200 00 
67,812 48 

89,090 57 
8,596 22 
6,341 99 
6,000 00 
9,150 00 
1,065 60 

15,202 79 
6,500 00 

5,500 06 

1,831 10 

33,127 45 


1 














2 


260 


5,348 29 
100 00 


243 
245 


4,346 00 










3 


261 


271 


200 00 






4 












5 


259 
264 


4,825 28 


243 


63 00 










6 












7 














283 


716 20 


8 














9 


















10 


















11 










270 


5,000 00 


284 


4,000 00 


12 


259 


3,000 00 






13 














14 














284 


2,000 00 


15 














16 


















17 


















18 


259 
261 

261 

261 


999 74 
1,000 08 

2,150 00 

29 61 

• 


243 
245 


5,125 00 
499 95 


270 
273 


17,855 45 


283 


6,000 00 


19 

20 










21 


245 


2,338 12 


273 
270 
273 


188 57 
1,175 00 


288 


700 00 


22 
2? 


261 
260 


2,000 00 
3,000 00 










24 










283 


1,572 37 


25 










20 










273 

273 
274 


4,154 57 
608 00 


288 
283 


753 64 
1,500 00 


27 


261 


60 00 


245 


87 00 


28 

29 
30 


261 
261 


177 33 
4 50 














31 














32 




' 










33 










292 
283 

284 


200 00 
8,927 76 

8,530 12 


34 












55 






30 










271 


66 10 


37 










3fl 


260 
261 


3,000 00 














39 














40 








271 

271 


1,065 60 
37 79 






41 










284 
282 


2,165 00 
2,000 00 


42 










45 


259 


1,000 00 
12 50 










44 
















45 


264 














45 




















28,338 54 


14,437 21 




32,461 37 




44,291 09 


619,382 85 





105 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on HARBOURS and BREAK 

NOVA SCOTIA 



Name of Work, 



Brought forward. 



North Sydney 

Oak Point (known as Kingsport) 

Oyster Pond, Chedabucto Bay 

Parrsboro' or Partridge Island Pier. 

Petit de Grat Inlet , 

Pictou Island 

Plympton 

Porper's Pond 

Port George 

do Greville . * 

do Hood Pier....l 

do Medway 

do Williams (now Port Lome)..., 

Porter's Lake 

Pudding Pan , 

Ragged Pond 

Salmon River Breakwater 

Saulnierville 

Scott's Bay 

Somerville 

Tancook Island , 

Three Fathom Harbour 

Trout Cove , 

Tusket Island , 

Victoria Harbour , 

White Point Harbour , 

Yarmouth do 



County. 



Cape Breton 

Kings , 

Guysboro' ... 
Cumberland 
Richmond ... 

Pictou 

Digby 

Guysboro' ..., 
Annapolis ... 
Cumberland 
Inverness. ... 

Queen's , 

Annapolis..., 

Halifax . 

Queen's 

Guysboro' .. 

Digby 

do 

King's .. 

Queen's 

Lunenburg.. 

Halifax 

Digby 

Yarmouth ... 

King's 

Queen's 

Yarmouth ... 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts. 
472,235 14 



24,045 70 
2,000 00 



3,543 97 
5,119 09 
7,000 00 
6,028 00 
16,469 81 
4,513 50 
3,500 00 



2,656 03 
2,000 00 



2,000 00 



4,000 00 
500 00 



13,417 79 



569,029 03 



1878. 



II. 



237 



239 



237 
237 



$ eta. 
27,619 50 



975 42 



777 53 



1,000 00 
3,500 00 



33,872 45 



Campbell's Cove. 



Colville Bay (Souris). 
Harbours Generally ... 

Malpeque 

Miminigash 



New London.... 

Rustico 

St. Peter's Bay. 



Tignish 



Wood Islands 

Totals, Prince Edward Island 



King's 



do 



Prince 
do , 



Queen's 

do 
King's. 



Prince' 



Queen's 



106 



PRINCE EE 



39,879 33 



4,814 10 



11,318 10 



56,011 53 



238 
240 



238 



238 
239 



28,759 38 



9,281 80 



1,754 30 
320 09 



40,115 57 



5 Victoria. 




Sessional 


Papers (No. 


10.) 


A. 1883 


/"ATERS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

Concluded. 


Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


XX 

a 


[. I $ cts. 
28,338 54 


II. 


$ cts. 
14,437 21 


II. 


$ cts. 
32,461 37 


II. 
281 


$ cts. 
44,291 09 

2,000 00 


$ cts. 
619,382 85 

2,000 00 
24,577 20 
2,250 01 
1,414 94 
3,000 00 
745 49 
3,543 97 
5,119 09 
7,000 00 
6,028 00 
21,397 07 
4,728 23 
4,245 76 
200 00 
5,714 75 
4,491 43 
2,656 03 
2,000 00 
3,000 00 
4,990 25 
2,000 00 
2,999 94 
5,499 76 
1,000 64 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
15,617 79 


'i? 


61 530 00 
61 250 01 
61 194 73 






273 


1 50 


4ft 










4 ( > 


244 
244 


195 79 
992 70 






288 
284 


49 00 
1.000 00 


50 


271 
270 


1,007 30 
745 49 


51 

5? 












53 
















r r\ 
















55 
















56 


61 149 73 
31 "' " 745* 76* 






271 


3,000 00 


288 


1,000 00 


57 


245 


214 73 


58 










5f> 










288 


200 00 


60 


59 5,714 75 
59 2,000 00 










61 


243 


1,991 43 






283 


500 00 


6°, 






6^ 


i 

59 3,000 6b 

30 4,990 25 














64 














65 














66 




67 


30 2,999 94 
34 500 64 


"243 


" 899 76 






*288 


"50600 


68 






70 














71 


31 500 00 
31 500 00 














72 










288 


1,700 00 


7» 












50,414 35 




18,831 62 










760,603 20 








245 
244 


130 22 
9,432 67 






287 

287 
288 
288 
286 

288 
286 
287 

287 

287 


7,291 20 

1,254 09 

376 82 

43 00 

1,500 00 

500 00 

4,549 60 

302 79 

4,327 20 

1,956 52 


7,421 42 

100,436 81 

2,821 50 

15,278 53 

6,466 57 

8,841 42 
4.549 60 
6,387 84 

19,754 53 

5,324 93 


i 


271 
273 
272 
272 

273 


12,948 39 

2,444 68 

1,400 00 

99S 77 

57 10 


2 
3 


52 3,936 80 
52 1,472 03 


245 
245 

244 

245 


356 29 
31 00 

1,998 19 


4 
5 

6 

7 


31 

54 237 09 

52 1,370 20 






272 
272 
272 


2,195 35 

2,997 03 

35 21 


8 


245 

244 
245 


555 02 
1,963 00 


9 
10 


21,511 91 


14,466 39 


23,076 53 




22,101 22 


177,283 15 





io> 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




1 

A. 188S' 


Expenditure on HARBOURS and BREAK! 

new; 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




0? 

1 


1878. 


1 




Gloucester 


$ cts. 
3,876 43 


II. 


$ ctsl 


fl 


Black River Pier. 


St. John 






3 


Campo Bello (Wilson's Beach) 

Clifton 


Charlotte 


1,600 00 


237 
236 


i,6oo 6o| 

4,565 75 1 


4 


Gloucester 


5 




Kent 




ft 


Dipper Harbour 

Grande Anse, Baie des Chaleurs 


St. John 

Gloucester, 


22,239 72 
3,998 98 






V 


236 


1,666 6bj 


8 




9 












in 




Albert 

do 


13,113 45 
3,000 00 
4,000 00 

14,583 24 
18,877 84 
35,493 81 
13,000 00 






11 


Hillsboro' 






1? 


Miramichi tug service 


Northumberland ... 






n 






14 


Quaco, Bay of Fundy 


St. John 






1 F > 


Richibucto 


Kent 

do 






IP. 


do tug service 


17 


Rocher Bay 


Albert 






18 






900 00 
15,464 93 






19 






236 


i,042 obji 


?0 


St. Andrews 


Charlotte 


?,1 


St. John Harbour 


St. John 


145,869 36 
2,500 00 


236 


80,155 oa! 


?? 


Tynemouth 


do 




Totals, New Brunswick 










298,517 76 




87,762 8<1| 











Amherst Harbour, Magdalen Islands 
Anse du Portage Slip and Wharf..... 



Anse St. Jean Pier. 



4 Bagotville Pier, River Saguenay. 

5 Baia St. Paul Pier 

6 Beauharnois, River St. Lawrence, 

7 Beloeil Piers and Booms 

8 Berthier (en bas) Pier 

9 Cap a l'Aigle Pier 



Carleton do 

Cedars do 

Chenal du Moine Pier. 



Chicoutimi Pier, River Saguenay. 
Coteau Landing Pier 



Eboulements Pier... . 
Etang du Nord Pier. 
Grenville Harbour... 



Carried forward. 



Gaspe 

Saguenay 



Chicoutimi. 



do 
Charlevoix... 
Beauharnois 

Montmagny . 

do y 
Charlevoix.. 



Bonaventure 
Soulanges...., 
Yamaska. ... 



Chicoutimi. 
Soulanges.. 

Charlevoix. 

Ga3pe. 

Argenteuil. 



10S 



14,283 21 



3,084 34 
25,621 03 



4,372 17 



10,041 75 
11,453 88 

13,207 57 



82,063 95 



236 



4,106 



46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No 


.10.) 


A. 188S 


WATERS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

BRUNSWICK. 


Year ended 30th June. 


Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


a 
52; 


ii. 


% cts. 


II. 


% cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


% cts. 


$ cts. 

3.376 43 
3,907 40 
2,807 11 
9,681 75 
941 76 

22,244 52 

7,156 28 

5 40 

1.770 60 

13,113 45 
3,000 00 
4,0C0 00 

32,572 67 
20,816 52 
38,447 22 
13,000 00 

3,130 00 

2,050 00 

22,084 97 

72 52 

256,150 99 
2,500 00 


1 


258 


3,907 40 










"286 
288 
286 


""207 ii" 
200 00 

941 76 


2 


259 


4,916 00 










4 










5 






245 


4 80 


"273 




p, 


•'58 


1,961 41 


195 89 






7 




245 


5 40 






8 







273 


1,393 78 


288 


376 82 


<•. 










M 



















1 1 


















]■) 


261 
2G4 


2,558 85 


243 

245 


4,084 68 


269 


273 21 


285 
285 
286 


11,072 69 
1,968 68 
1,000 00 


13 

14 






243 


753 41 


270 


1,200 00 


15 






16 


259 

261 

, 258 

"258 

| 264 


1,260 00 
400 00 
627 75 

16,687 99 


242 
245 


1,860 00 


273 
269 
269 

269 


10 00 

750 00 

2,000 00 

2,222 78 






17 






18 






285 
285 

285 


2,950 29 
72 52 

5,299 55 


1<» 


244 


5,916 26 


20 
21 


























12,624 55 








24,089 42 


463,359 59 





452 66 



4,151 65 



4,604 31 



242 



242 
246 



256 
242 



252 
356 



247 



2,160 84 



606 00 
4,515 83 



55 00 
92 63 



941 09 



5 40 



,376 79 



268 
269 
285 
269 
275 
269 
285 



267 

267 
285 
276 

269 



285 



1,500 07 

3,897 70 

13 00 

870 55 

134 05 



1,653 25 

1,137 91 
1,049 39 
1,927 97 

1,999 91 



1,028 68 
1,165 11 



16,377 59 



109 



282 
279 
302 

282 
281 
290 
302 
303 



279 
278 
282 
302 
292 
282 
302 
282 

302 

279 



584 43 

1,091 72 

2,204 59 
4,742 70 
1,386 58 

205 71 



1,293 00 

3,527 40 

2,711 62 

30 00 

824 30 
8 00 

272 97 
11,747 52 



30,630 54 



14,283 21 
584 43 

4,752 63 

9,186 63 

30,982 73 

6,772 96 

394 76 

9,024 15 

2,946 25 

4,665 31 

3,761 01 

1,957 97 

17,017 61 

11,461 88 

15,450 31 

12,912 63 

5 40 



146,159 87 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188! 



Expenditure on HARBOURS and BREAI 

QUEBEC-! 



Name of Work. 



Brought forward 



Grosse Isle Harbour 

Harbours Generally 

House Harbour 

Isle aux Coudres Pier 

Isle aux Grues do 

Laprairie, River St. Lawrence 



Les Ecureuils Pier. 
L 'Islet Pier 



Malbaie do 
Matane do 



Montreal Harbour 

Mooring Piers, Lachine Rapids. 



New Carlisle Pier 

Nicolet River (Harbour of Refuge)... 

Perce Breakwater (Examination and 

Survey) 



Piers below Quebec Generally 

Pointe St. Laurent Pier 

Quebec Harbour (Survey River St 

Charles) 

do 

Rimouski Pier 

Riviere Blanche Pier 



do du Loup do 



do Ouelle do 

Ste. Anne's Wharf, River Saguenay, 



St. Dominique Pier 

Ste. Famille do 

St. Jean Pier, Isle d' Orleans. 
St. Jean Port Joli Pier 



St. Thomas Pier. 
St. Timothee do . 

St. Zotique do . 



Tadousac Fish Dams., 
Trois Pistoles Pier 



Totals, Quebec. 



County. 



Montmagny., 



Gaspe (Magdelen Islands) 

Charlevoix 

Montmagny 

Laprairie 



Portneuf. 
L'Islet 



Charlevoix. 
Rimouski... 



City of Montreal. 



Bonaventure . 
Nicolet , 



Gaspe 



Montmorency. . 

City of Quebec, 
do 

Rimouski 

do 



T6miscouata. 



Kamouraska . 
Chicoutimi... 



Soulanges 

Montmorency . 

do 
L'Islet 



Montmagny.. 
Beauharnois 



Soulanges. 



Saguenay 

Temiscouata. 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts. 
82,063 95 



2,291 60 



6,412 04 
16,143 34 



860 95 



3,829 91 



6,458 02 



2,616 00 
1,953 81 

1,861 86 



4,622 78 



129,114 26 



225 



245 



236 



110 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



WATERS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

Concluded. 























Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


CD 

a 


II. 


$ cts. 
4,604 31 


II. 


$ Cts. 
8,376 79 


II. 

267 
269 


$ cts. 
16,377 59 

6,645 14 
1,319 09 


"J 

278 
282 

282 


$ cts. 
30,630 54 

3,415 19 
1,597 51 


$ cts. 
146,159 87 

10,060 33 
2,916 60 
2,291 60 
3,718 00 
2,636 18 
417 43 

1,571 13 
25/925 69 

17,937 04 
11,271 43 

747 25 
860 95 

4,220 20 

594 52 

499 43 

12,858 25 
1,266 13 

6,458 02 
46 50 

2.616 00 
5,101 73 

16,104 19 

12,848 53 
128 20 

1,952 74 

9,323 86 

470 93 

3.617 82 

5,256 96 
11 10 

1,070 75 

4,046 46 
3,500 00 


is 










19 










710 










267 


1,683 50 


278 
280 
290 
280 
282 


2,034 50 

2,636 18 

325 73 

1,571 13 


V 










n 










275 


91 70 


?,3 










u 




257 


6,058 92 


242 
242 
256 
242 


670 66 

1,014 93 
72 43 


285 


50 82 


a 5 




302 
282 
282 
292 


778 77 
1,199 00 

601 25 


w 


258 


100,00 00 


Tt 


269 


146 00 


?8 










99 














278 
282 
281 

282 

303 


4,220 20 
594 52 

499 43 

1,696 39 


30 














31 














37! 


257 

257 


1,988 42 
708 76 


242 

256 
242 


758 46 
100 55 


269 
285 
285 


3,078 04 
456 82 


33 








V\ 










269 


46 50 






3fi 














37 


257 


1,557 48 


240 
242 


713 37 










W 


269 
285 

269 


1,241 63 
2,444 09 


280 
282 
279 

303 
282 

308 
281 


4,360 00 

3,510 81 
128 20 

26 75 
4,999 78 


39 

40 
-11 




i 






269 

285 
285 
269 
267 

285 


2,830 67 

470 93 

10 00 

3,743 87 


4° 






242 


1,493 41 


i° 






44 


257 


1,044 56 


242 

280 


497 91 
1,513 09 


282 


65 35 


45 
4fi 






282 
282 
292 
280 
303 
279 


11 10 

1,070 75 

3,464 32 
3,500 00 


<17 














48 










285 


582 14 


49 








50 
















35,638 74 




17,323 93 




43,144 52 




72,937 40 


318,505 82 














111 











46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 1883, 


Expenditure on HARBOURS and BREAI 

ONT.i 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




g 


1878. 


1 


Bayfield, Lake Huron 


Huron 


$ cts. 

54,521 98 
11,962 60 


II. 

239 
239 


$ Ct: 

2,045 5<j 
2, 060 0(; 


■> 




Hastings 


3 


Bruce Mines 


Algoma 


■1 


Chantry Island, Lake Huron 


Bruce 


235,461 29 
73,036 32 

57,468 43 
400 00 






5 




Northumberland 


235 


""8,533 ! $1 


6 


Collingwood, Georgian Bay 


Simcoe 


7 


Colpoy's Range, Big Bay 


Bruce 






8 




Prince Edward 






9 


Goderich, Lake Huron , 

Hawkesbury, Ottawa River 


Huron 


467,396 10 






10 


Prescott 






11 


Harbours Generally 










12 


Inverhuron, Lake Huron 


Bruce 


6,093 60 

48,458 64 
14,814 40 






13 




do 


235 


9,421 4H 


14 


Kingston, Lake Ontario .. 

Little Current, Lake Huron 


City of Kingston 


IP 


Algoma 






lfi 




Grey 


22,899 19 


239 


250 C 


17 


Morpeth 


Bothwell 


18 








235 


5,000 '<■ 


19 




Halton 


588 20 

5,000 00 

10,367 55 


20 


Oshawa do 


Ontario 






21 




Grey 






2«j 


Penetanguishene 

Pickering » 


Simcoe , 






23 


Ontario 








9 1 


Picton 


Prince Edward 


6,000 00 

6,000 00 

8,595 97 
5,000 00 
2,658 50 


239 


i',5bo"c 


9 5 


Port Albert, Lake Huron 


Huron 


26 


Elgin 


235 
248 


1,459 4U 


27 




Durham 


28 




Norfolk 






•?9 


do Elgin, Lake Huron 




30 


do Hope, Lake Ontario 


Durham 


25,318 55 






31 


do Rowan, Lake Erie 

do Royal do 


Norfolk 






32 


do 








33 


do Stanley do 


Elgin 


8,158 00 






'-M 






35 


Presqu'Isle, Georgian Bay 


Grey 


26,950 12 

183,345 80 

6,000 00 
2,992 94 






^fi 


Rondeau, Lake Erie 


Kent 






37 


Saugeen or Southampton 


Bruce 






38 




Hastings 

Grey 






39 






1 


40 




Algoma 


a 5, 999 25 






41 


Tobermory 






12 


York 


20.919 05 


239 
235 
239 


6,139 |l 
4,139 |l 


,19 




Hastings 












1,316,406 48 


| 38,488 11 










(a) Further expenditure included 


m Pacific Railway. 
112 









4G 


Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 


A. 1SS 


3 


WATEKS for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

RIO. 






Year ended 30th June. 






Total 
for 15 Years 

to 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1 

to 


II. 

257 
263 


$ cts. 

4,950 00 
2,520 98 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


% cts. 


$ cts. 

61,517 55 

22,688 24 

1,581 33 

235,469 81 

92,161 89 

84,636 32 

900 00 

3,236 13 

471,531 16 

1,164 90 

10,561 33 

6,093 60 

78,049 68 
14,814 40 
12,415 25 

25,714 13 

514 40 

5,000 00 

588 20 

5,000 00 

55,781 17 

2,624 07 

4,999 00 

13.487 85 

9,521 31 

10,055 37 
5,000 00 
2,661 46 
3,180 97 

30,401 69 

150 00 

281 83 

8,758 00 

3,390 40 

26,981 34 

197,890 76 

8,559 60 
2,992 94 

3,469 98 

5,999 25 

349 20 

70,589 95 

6,418 54 


j 


246 


1,255 03 






276 

290 


4,949 63 
1,581 33 


2 






3 


264 


8 52 










\ 






264 

265 
266 


4,301 06 

7,990 00 
500 00 


274 
277 
278 


8,291 20 
8,566 10 


5 


257 


4.104 81 


241 


6,506 98 


6 

7 










290 
276 
290 
290 
278 


3,236 13 

2,805 06 

159 23 

6,194 43 


g 










274 
275 
267 


1,330 00 
1,005 67 
4,366 90 


9 










10 










11 










12' 


256 
264 


8,803 55 


241 


1,870 30 


265 


6,009 25 


275 


3,486 48 


13 
14 






246 
241 
246 


2,415 25 
672 33 


265 

275 
265 


4,816 22 

1,882 61 
421 80 


275 
278 


5,183 78 
10 00 


15 






]P< 


256 


92 60 


17 










18 


















19 


















20 


263 


6,589 77 


246 
246 


1.951 30 
1,624 25 


265 

275 


6,929 98 
999 82 


275 


29,942 57 


21 

99 


257 


4,999 00 






*>3 




1,335 25 






290 


468 00 


?4 


266 




?5 










TrG 


















?7 


264 


2 96 














9R 










276 

277 


3,180 97 
5,083 14 


90) 














SO 






246 


150 00 






SI 














S?| 










277 
276 


600 00 
3,390 40 


33 














34 






246 


31 22 






B5 






265 


5,069 96 


274 
290 
276 
278 


(a) 

9,475 00 

2,559 60 


36 










37 














38 














277 


3,469 98 


39 














40 














275 


14,280 49 


41 


256 
263 


11,746 88 
400 00 


241 
246 


10,315 29 
1,879 48 


266 


7,188 56 


42 
4 » 












48,403 67 




30,288 51 




55,292 79 




118,303 07 


1,607,183 00 






10a-8 


$300 


paid by Counc 


tlof( 

• 


bounty of Kent. 
113 











46 Victoria. Sessi 


onal Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 188! 


Expenditure on HARBOURS and BREA] 

MA 1 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

trom 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




o 




1878. 


1 






$ cts. 


II. 


$ clj 














BRITK 


i 








II. 




2 








223 


4,480 




Totals 










4,480 












HARB0U1 


1 


Harbours generally 






















Abstract Statement of Expenditure c 


i 






569,029 03 

56,011 53 

298,517 76 

129,114 26 

1,316,406 48 




33,872 4 
40,115 t 
87,762 I 
20,346 « 
38,488 4M 


■? 


Prince Edward Island 




3 






4 






5 






fi 


Manitoba 




7 


British Columbia 








""^ASO'M 


8 


Generally 










Totals 












2,369,079 06 




225,066 Ji 









Expenditure on IMPROVEMENTS 

NO\i 



1 


Annapolis River 

East River, Pictou 


Annapolis 








? 


Pictou 


342 73 






3 


Partridge Island River 


Cumberland 






4 


Sissiboo River 


Disrbv 


2,500 00 








Totals 










2,842 73 



























m 




1 




Victoria 




II. 






? 


Miramichi do 


Northumberland 


2,955 48 
12,436 00 








3 


Albert 








4 


Richibucto do 










5 




24,985 46 


233 


2,903 




f> 




Sunbury 




7 
















Totals 














40,376 94 




2,903 
















114 

• 











46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



WATERS for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 

MB A. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


03 

a 

3 


II. 1 $ cts. 
....I 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 1 $ cts. 
1 


II. 1 $ cts. 
2881 223 39 


$ cts. 
223 39 


1 


1 






1 





COLUMBIA. 








* 














II. 




11. 

273 
273 


72 00 
939 61 


11. 

289 
289 


642 91 

1,785 99 


714 91 
7.384 85 


1 






228 


179 25 


2 














179 25 




1,011 61 




2,428 90 


8,099 76 












GENERALLY. 















289 


6,083 35 


6,083 35 


1 








^HARBOURS and BREAKWATERS. 






50,414 35 
21,511 91 
32,319 40 
35,633 74 
48,403 67 




18,831 62 
14,466 39 
12,624 55 
17,323 93 
30,288 51 

'179*2*5' 




37,215 66 
23,076 53 
8,045 66 
43,144 52 
55,292 79 

""i,oii*6i' 




51,240 09 

22,101 22 

24,089 42 

72,937 40 

118,30- 07 

223 39 

2,428 90 

6,083 35 


760,603 20 

177,283 15 

463,359 59 

318,505 82 

1,607,183 00 

223 39 

8,099 76 

6,083 35 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 








8 




















188,288 07 




93,714 25 




167,786 77 




297,406 84 


3,341,341 26 




RI 

sec 


\TERS for t 

>TIA. 


he 


underment] 


Lone 


d Years. 











IL. 
243 



1,333 77 



1,333 77 



II. 
291 



2,000 00 



2,000 00 



II. 

283 



2,500 00 



2,500 00 



1,333 77 

312 73 

4,500 00 

2,500 00 



8,676 50 



BRUNSWICK. 


















II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 

286 
288 


1,037 06 


1,037 06 

2,955 48 

12.436 00 

998 09 

47,304 19 

814 58 

2,000 00 


1 














•> 


















3 






227 

227 

227 


998 09 

4,421 89 
100 00 










4 


244 


7,229 37 


269 

273 


4,109 14 


285 
288 
288 
285 


3.655 18 
714 58 

1,000 00 


5 


273 


1,000 00 


1 














7,229 37 




5,519 98 




5,109 14 




6,406 32 


67,545 40 




1 


10 a— 8£ 








115 











4u Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



Expenditure on IMPROVEMENTS of RIVER 



II 
A. 18831 

=3 

RIVER | 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




a 


1878. 


1 


Berthier (e?i haut) 


Berthier 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ ct 


o 




Gaspe .' 


792 20 
3,283 79 






^ 


Chateauguay 

Escoumains 

Gatineau 


Chateauguay 






4 


Saguenay 






'i 


Ottawa 


38,137 82 






8 


L'Assomption 

Ottawa , 


L'Assomption 






7 




2,559 37 
34,186 31 






R 


Richelieu 




239 


4,351 1 


9 


do Maintenance of Buoys 




10 


Riviere a la Graisse, Ri^aud 


Rigaud 


527 62 






11 


do du Lievre... 


Ottawa 






1? 


do du Loup (en bas) 


Temiscouata 








13 


do do (en hauf) 


Maskinonge 


2,000 00 






14 


do du Nord 








1^ 


Saguenay (Channel belovvChicoutimi) 

do (Enlargement La Grande 

Decharge, Lake St. John) 


Saguenay & Chicoutimi. 
do do 








16 








17 


Salmon, North Shore Ottawa River 
St. Francis 


Ottawa 








18 




14,218 51 
17.000 00 
13,752 37 






19 


St. Lawrence (Removal of Rock Cap 


Champlain andLotbiniere 






20 


do (Dredging at Contre- 






21 


do (Improving Channel be- 
tween Lake St.Francis 
and Montreal) 








22 


do (Dredging from Bou- 
cherville to Longue 
Pointe) 


Chambly and Hochelaga 
Quebec Harbour 








23 


do (Removal of Chains 
and Anchors) 

do (Maintenance of Buov3) 
St. Placide ..... 


49,039 52 


223 


12,000 cl 


?A 




W> 








H 


?J 


Yamaska 












Total< 












175,497 51 




16,351 ljjfc.. 








ontH 


1 


Detroit 




7,260 32 


II. 




?! 


Gananoque 


Leeds 






3 






17,527 12 
9,601 92 


239 
223 


i,499 eji 

8,000 (It*, 


4 


Neebish Rapids, St. Mary's River 




r> 






6 






5,368 53 

825 10 

8,265 16 

(a) 15,156 12 






7 


Salmon 


Hastings 






8 


Sydenham 








9 


Thames , 








10 


Trent.... 






1 




Totals 












64,004 27 




9,499 i\i s. 












116 









46 Victoria, 




Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 


A. 1883 


or the undermentioned years — 
IBC. 


Continued. 










Year ended 30th June. 








Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


II. 

268 
275 


1881. 


1882. 


a 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
4,189 67 


II. 
282 


$ cts. 
150 65 


$ cts. 

4,340 32 

792 20 

3,283 79 

1,189 80 

39,264 17 

5,714 55 

3,162 57 

46,657 22 

855 55 

6,401 76 

4,316 89 

693 44 

2,000 00 

1,627 51 

13,559 94 

6,303 16 

746 16 

14,218 51 

'17,000 00 

13,752 37 

3,691 30 

2.212 50 

93,816 98 

1,578 21 
1,719 51 
7,008 02 


i 










?, 


















n 










268 


1,189 80 






4 










290 
290 
281 
281 
303 
290 
292 


1,126 35 
1,496 04 
299 00 
799 20 
358 75 
1,816 02 
711 91 


R 






246 
227 

227 
227 
246 


2,518 15 

4 20 

415 54 

103 05 

2,465 22 


275 


1,700 36 


6 


273 
263 


300 00 
3,465 64 


7 


275 
285 
275 
276 
275 


3,439 41 

393 75 

1,592 90 

3,604 98 

693 44 


8 

9 






10 






11 










\9, 














13 






247 
246 


329 96 
4,599 14 


265 
275 


926 81 
3,327 95 


290 
280 
290 
280 
282 


370 74 
5,632 85 
6,303 16 


14 






15 






16 










275 


746 16 


17 














Ifl 


















lfl 


















fin 














290 
279 
292 

292 


3,691 30 

2,212 50 

10,041 11 
318 94 


ftl 














)0 




8,249 16 


247 
227 


6,601 35 

990 88 
1,719 51 


2'68 
269 
276 


7,885 84 
268 39 


23 

24 






•> r > 








281 


7,008 02 


W? 
















12,014 80 




19,747 00 




29,959 46 




42,336 54 


295,906 43 




10. 














(I. 




IL 




II. 




II. 




7,260 32 

245 17 

19,026 80 

36,171 85 
1,105 86 

10,898 34 

1,913 53 

8,265 16 

(«) 18,828 31 

1,897 43 


1 










275 


245 17 






2 


iU 


9,120 62 


227 




277 


500 00 


3 

4 




264 
275 


1,105 86 


5 




300 00 






290 


1,088 43 


6 








7 














8 


263 


549 75 


227 


3,122 44 










9 




264 


1,897 43 






10 



















9,970 37 




12,071 75 




3,545 08 


6,521 62 


105,612 77 








(a) 


Including $2,4C 


pai 


d by Counties I 


Cent 


md Lambton. 







in 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 1883J 


Expenditure on IMPROVEMENTS of EIVEES 

MAN] 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from ■ 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 






i 


1878. 


i 






$ cts. 


II. 


$ eta, 


?! 


Fairford or Partridge Crop River 








' 


S 


Rainy Lake and River 











4 






5,234 90 








Totals 










5,234 90 
















BRITISI 


1 












*> 








223 




89 7S 


^ 




' 


11 09 69 


-1 












Totals 












11,499 69 




89 75 

















] 


VORTH-WES' 


1 


Saskatchewan 








. 















Abstract Statement of Expenditure 



1 






2,842 73 

40,376 94 

175,497 51 

64,004 27 

5,234 90 






fl 


New Brunswick 




2,903 15 

16,351 12 

9,499 68 


3 


Quebec 




A 






5 


Manitoba 




fi 


North-West Territories 








7 


British Columbia 




11,499 69 




89 75 




Totals 






299,456 04 




28,843 70 









Expenditur; 
CONST RU< 
NOVA SCOTIA A3 



"Canada" 

"Cape Breton" 

" New Dominion ' ; 

" St. Lawrence " 

Tugs 

" George McKenzie ". 



Totals, N.S. and N.B. 



41,300 19 

17,884 38 

27,676 51 

114,911 23 

350 50 



202,122 81 



II 

238 



1,860 0C 



118 



6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 15S3 



mw BRUNSWICK. 



)Y the undermentioned years 

OBA. 


— Concluded. 










Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


3 

525 


[I. $ cts. 
244 1,500 00 


II. 

228 


$ cts. 
2,499 63 


II. 

273 


$ cts. 
19 00 


II. 

288 
288 


$ cts. 

160 00 
3,951 43 


$ cts. 

4,178 63 
3,951 43 
3,000 00 
6,234 90 


1 

2 


244 3,000 00 
244 (a) 1,000 00 










3 














4 
















5,500 00 


2,499 63 




19 00 




4,111 43 


17,364 96 




COLUMBIA. 


244 " 'flOof 






276 
273 

274 
273 


"670 00 ' 

7,635 53 
610 59 


288 


474 65 


474 65 
1,469 82 

?9,566 22 
990 84 


1 

2 


227 
228 


10,431 00 


"289 


' 380 25 


3 










710 07 




10,431 00 




8,916 12 




851 90 


32,501 53 




'ERRITORIES. 












288 


714 48 


714 48 


T 














|>n IMPROVEMETS of RIVERS. 






1,333 77 

5,519 98 

19,747 00 

12,071 75 

2,499 63 




2,000 00 

5,109 14 

29,959 46 

3,545 08 

19 00 




2,500 00 

6, 106 82 

42,336 54 

6,521 62 

4,111 43 

714 48 

851 90 


8.676 50 

67,545 40 

293,906 43 

105,612 77 

17,364 96 

714 48 

32,501 53 


1 


7,229 37 

12,014 80 

9,970 37 

5,500 00 




3 
4 
5 
6 


710 07 




10,431 00 




8,916 12 




7 


j 35,424 61 




51,603 13 


49,548 80 




63,445 79 


528,322 07 




>n DREDGES 
riON. 


• 

















II. 












II. 

289 


1,478 25 


42,778 44 
19,744 38 
30,826 51 
116,389 48 
350 50 
15,000 00 


1 














fl 


.1 












289 
289 


3,150 00 
1,478 25 


3 
4 


263 


15,000 00 














r, 

















15,000 00 












6,106 50 


225,089 31 




















(«) 


St. Andrews Rt 


ipids 


119 











10 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on DREDG-ES 

PRINCE 

















Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




1 


1878. 


1 


"Prince Edward" 




$ cts. 
23,582 07 


II. 1 $ cts 








1 


QU1| 


i 


u Nipissing " 






















on] 


1 


"Challenge" 




31,211 32 
6,847 05 






a 


Tug " C. W. Jones " or " Trudeau". 














38,058 37 
















BRITIsJ 


1 


"Douglas"; 




1,447 96 
6,250 00 






? 


Tuff " Georere" 










Totals, British Columbia..... 










7,697 96 
















Abstract Statement of Expenditure 


i 


Nova Scotia 




101,061 40 

23,582 07 

101,061 41 




930 0C: 


? 


Prince Edward Island 






? 


New Brunswick 




930 00 


4 


Quebec 






^ 


Ontario 




38,058 37 
7,697 96 






6 












Totals 










271,461 21 




1,860 (X 








DREDGES-; 


l 


Nova Scotia 




101,061 40 

23,582 07 

101,061 41 




930 <M 


7 


Prince Edward Island 




S 


New Brunswick 






930 o<; 


4 


Quebec. 




fl 


Ontario 




38,058 37 
7,697 96 






A 


British Columbia 










Totals » 






271,461 21 




1,860 0' 












120 






1 



4C 


Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No, 


10.) 


A. IS! 


33 


for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 

WARD ISLAND. 




• 

Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1 


H. 



% cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 1 $ cts. 
1 


$ cts. 
23,582 07 


1 












1 




BEC. 










273 


15,221 57 


289 


280 00 


15,501 57 


1 













ARIO. 



















31,211 32 
6,847 05 


7 


















2 
































38,058 37 





COLUMBIA. 



















1,447 96 
6,250 00 


1 


















2 




































7,697 96 























on DREDGES— Construction. 



15,000 00 



15,000 00 



15,221 57 



15,221 57 



BEPAIRS. 



3,053 25 



3,053 25 
280 00 



6,386 50 



120,044 65 
23,5S2 07 

105,044 66 

15,501 57 

38,058 37 

7,697 96 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


309,929 28 





II. 

245 
245 
245 
245 
245 
U45 





II. 


3,248 70 


274 


1,624 35 


274 


1,624 36 


274 


1,243 73 


274 


884 84 


274 


5,158 65 


274 


13,784 63 







II 


1,879 59 


287 


1,253 06 


287 


1,879 58 


287 


5,928 27 


287 


1,382 10 


287 


1,775 07 


287 


14,097 67 





6,065 00 
1,000 65 
6,065 00 
2,213 07 
3,949 54 
2,113 65 



21,406 91 



11,193 29 
3,878 06 
9,568 94 
9,385 07 
6,216 48 
9,047 37 



49,289 21 



121 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Expenditure on DKEDGING 



Name of Work. 



Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island. 

New Brunswick 

Quebec 

Ontario 

British Columbia 



Totals 



County. 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts. 

81,243 99 
31,940 92 
91,488 10 
16,570 88 
22,258 88 
56,771 09 



300,273 86 



II. 



239 
239 
239 
239 

239 



1878. 



$ cts. 

25,958 79 

12,011 18 

23,327 89 

4,519 84 

9,220 85 

541 64 



75,580 19 



Expenditure onj 
CONSTKUcj 
QUE 



1 


Saguenay District Works.... 










2 


St. Maurice «do 


St. Maurice and 


Cham- 


145,863 34 

23,423 09 

28,716 94 

318 00 

2,500 00 

19,478 54 

3,037 35 

10,466 48 




; 




Ottawa River (^ of Expenditure) 


?> 








4 


Gatineau do 




5 


Coulonge do 








6 


Black do 


do 






7 


Dumoine do 


do 






8 


Riviere des Prairies (removal of 
obstructions, &c) 








9 


Riviere des Prairies (Sault au Re- 
collet Pier) 


do ... . 


















233,803 74 
















ONTA 


10 


Ottawa River Q of Expenditure).... 

Madawaska River 

Petawawa do 

South Nation do 




23,423 09 
1,350 00 
7,713 00 


II. 




11 








11 


do 






1°. 










14 


Newcastle District Works 


Victoria, Ontario, 
boro', Hastings, 
umberland 


Peter- 
North- 


5,043 20 


238 


591 28 




Totals Ontario 








37,529 29 




591 28 S 




Grand Totals Quebec and Ontario 






271,333 03 




591 28 










122 







16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned Years. 












Year ended 30th June. 


Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


s 


II. 

263 
263 
263 
263 
263 
263 


$ cts. 

28,822 72 
9,164 07 

28,002 03 

6,919 05 

8,743 96 

920 35 


II. 

246 
246 
246 
246 
246 
246 


$ cts. 

33,862 28 

11,050 63 

15,630 19 

(a) 


II. 

274 
274 
274 
274 
274 
274 


$ cts. 

22,000 00 
8,798 53 

10,508 03 

2,377 64 

2,167 03 

222 00 


II. 

287 
290 
290 
298 
290 
290 
290 


$ cts. 

26,061 78 
8,355 92 

11,324 94 
9,215 76 
1,311 48 
8,341 54 


$ cts. 

217,949 56 
81,321 25 

180,281 18 
39,603 17 
46,928 78 
76,395 01 


1 

2 
3 
4 


3,226 58 
9,598 39 


5 
6 


82,572 18 




73,368 07 




46,073 23 




64,611 42 


642,478 95 




SL] 
TIC 

BEC 


[DES and ] 
AST. 


BOC 


)MS. 















265 



400 00 



400 00 



II. 



245 



245 



11,074 50 



409 50 



11,484 00 



275 
276 
276 



6,677 33 
509 84 



7,187 17 



II. 
291 



291 
292 
291 



2,418 50 



5,300 08 
217 50 



7,936 08 



2,418 50 



168,915 25 

24,150 43 

29,526 44 

318 00 

2,500 00 

19,478 54 

3,037 35 

10,466 48 



260,810 99 



RIO. 



II. 




II. 




II. 
276 


509 84 


II. 

291 
291 


217 50 
4,317 81 


24,150 43 

5,667 81 

7,713 00 

488 45 

6,279 58 


10 










11 














1? 






245 


488 45 










13 










271 


645 10 


14 






















488 45 




509 84 


5,180 41 


44,299 27 




, m 











400 00 




11,972 45 




7,697 01 




13,116 49 


305,110 26 





(a) Included in Harbours. 



123 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1S83 



Expenditure on SLIDES and BOOMS 

STAFF AND 
QUE 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30tk June, 

1877. 




03 


• 


1878. 


1 


Saguenay District Works- 




$ cts. 

400 23 

7,442 43 

14,396 77 


II. 


$ eta. 


9 


Staff 


do 


246 

246 


882 85 


3 




do 


597 60 




Totals 








22,239 43 




1,480 45 




St. Maurice District Works- 
Collection, &c 

Staff 


St. Maurice and Cham- 




4 


3,987 44 

136,453 26 

63,647 78 


246 
246 
246 


550 00 


^ 


do do ... 
do do ... 


12,759 50 
6,232 87 


6 


Repairs 




Totals 




204,088 48 




19,542 37 




Ottawa Works — 




7 


87,956 95 


245 


9,954 19 




Repairs, viz. : 

Ottawa River 'Q of expen- 
diture)... 




8 


53,533 79» 
21,962 17 
13,850 15 
18,269 59 
10,992 14 


245 


1,159 93 


<H 


Gatineau River 


Ottawa 


10 


Coulonge do 






1 1 


Black do 


do 






JH 


Dumoine do 


do 








Totals, Repairs 








118,607 84 




1,159 93 




Riviere des Prairies— Sault au Recol- 
letPier 






13 


1,891 13 








Grand Totals, Quebec... 










434,783 83 


32,136 94 



ONTA 



1 


Ottawa District Works — 

Staff (J of expenditure) 




87,956 95 


245 


9,954 18 




Repairs, viz. : 

Ottawa River Q of expen- 
diture) 






2 


53,433 80 
53,812 02 
25,220 42 


245 
245 
245 


1,159 93 


3 


Madawaska River 


Renfrew 


567 06 


4 


Petawawa do 


do 


1,455 32 


5 


South Nation do . 






Totals, Repairs 












132,466 24 


3,182 31 




Newcastle Works — 

Collection, &c , ( 


Victoria,Ontario, Peter- ") 
boro', Hastings and [■ 
Northumberland J 




6 


67 20 
12,996 87 
45,136 48 


246 
246 
246 


16 22 


7 


Staff i 


2,366 45 


8 


Repairs ( 


5,963 11 




Totals 






58,200 55 




8,345 78 




Grand Totals, Ontario.. 








278,623 74 




21,482 27 



124 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1SS3 



for the undermentioned years — Continued. 
EEPAIES. 

BEC. 





Year 


ended 30th June. 








Total 
for 15 Years 

to 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882.' 





II. 

271 

271 


$ cts. 

""753*05 

5,491 02 


II. 

"255 

255 


$ cts 

""71005" 
4,611 74 


II. 

"285 
285 


$ cts. 

"853" 68* 
6,210 39 


II. 

303 
303 


$ cts. 



1,438 58 
5,064 21 


$ cts. 

400 23 
12,080 64 
36,371 73 


1 
2 
3 




6,244 07 




5,321 79 




7,064 07 




6,502 79 


48,852 60 




272 
271 
271 


559 00 

13,355 19 

4,291 19 


256 
255 
255 


773 52 

14,823 01 
8,497 07 


286 
284 
284 


578 50 

14,993 41. 

3,831 27 


304 
301 
301 


710 00 

17,768 48 

9,167 21 


7,158 46 

210,152 85 

95,667 39 


4 

r, 

6 




18,205 38 




24,093 60 




19,403 18 




27,645 69 


312,978 70 




271 


10,318 37 


254 


8,732 64 


284 


9,543 03 


302 


11,051 61 


137,556 79 


7 


271 
271 
271 

271 


1,831 76 
269 39 
288 09 
340 27 


247 
254 
254 
254 
254 
255 


2.290 93 

1,294 60 

699 02 

749 31 

225 01 


284 
284 
284 
284 
284 


1,076 54 
744 87 

2,427 10 
382 85 

1,127 46 


302 
302 
302 
302 
302 


3,828 92 

1,128 92 

677 73 

587 56 

2,192 05 


63.721 87 
25,399 95 
17,942 09 
20,329 58 
14,536 66 


8 
9 
10 

11 

1*> 










2,729 51 


255 


5,258 87 




5,758 82 




8,415 18 


141,930 15 








493 22 






302 


301 38 


2,685 73 


n 












37,497 33 




43,900 12 




41,769 10 




53,916 65 


644,003 97 





271 


10,318 36 


254 


8,732 65 


284 


9,543 03 


302 


11,051 61 


137,556 78 


1 






254 
254 
254 


1,592 39 

2,361 70 

738 72 


284 
284 
284 


1,076 54 
1,994 25 . 
2,851 22 
122 19 


302 
302 
302 
302 


3,828 92 

4.398 22 

'990 53 

528 66 


61,091 58 

63,977 66 

31,721 10 

650 85 


•> 


271 
271 


844 41 
464 89 


3 

4 
5 
















1,309 3d 




4,692 81 




6,044 20 




9,746 33 


157,441 19 
















303 
303 
303 


77 93 

582 50 

3,028 53 


161 35 
19,327 10 
61,163 24 


ft 


271 
271 


2,238 21 
5,984 78 


255 
255 


614 07 
1,050 34 


285 


529 00 


7 
R 












8,222 99 


1,664 41 




629 00 




3,688 96 


80,651 69 






19,850 65 




15,089 87 




16,116 23 




24,486 90 


375,649 66 





125 



16 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188! 



Expenditure on SLIDES and BOOMM: 

STAFF AN1IEF 

GENEijij,: 



Name of Work , 



Generally 



County. 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts. 



1878. 



2481 



ctf 
48 5: 



Abstract Statement of Expenditure on SLIDE d 



Quebec .... 
Ontario ... 
Generally 



Totals 



434,783 83 
278,623 74 



713,407 57 



32,136 9 

21,482 2 

48 5: 



53,667 7; 



Expenditure on EOAD md 

NOV KM 



1 


Mail Road between Liverpool and 




1,509 92 












1 




NE 


m 


1 


Apohaqui Bridge 


King's 


2,368 34 


















Qt 


:EC 



Gatineau Bridge 

Gulf Road 

Isle aux Noix (roadway and bridging) 
Metapedia Road 



Ottawa Union Suspension Bridge (6) 
Petite Nation Bridge 



7 Portage du Fort Bridge 

8 Port Lewis and Huntingdon Road.... 
9! ttestigouche Road 

10 Temiscouata do 
ILGenerally 



Totals, Quebec. 



Ottawa 

Rimouski & Bonaventure. 

St. John's 

Bonaventure 



Ottawa and Carleton. 
Prescott 



Pontiac 

Huntingdon 

Rimouski & Bonaventure. 
Temiscouata 



272 10 
10,000 00 



19,729 70 



685 86 

(a) 

17,066 20 

12,093 25 

8,335 82 

20,991 16 

3,127 00 



95,719 61 



II. 



240 



245 



500 



107 3 



607 



(a) Including $4,000 contributcdby the Local Government of Ontario, also $1,500 bj r the municipali 
(6) Proportion of expenditure. 

126 



|46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1S83 



'for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 
REPAIRS. 

ALLY. 




Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882 . 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


03 

a 


in. 


$ cts. 


II. 1 $ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
48 52 


i 






1 












and BOOMS— STAFF and REPAIRS. 







37,497 33 
19,850 65 




43,900 12 
15,089 87 




41,769 10 
16,116 23 




53,916 65 
24,486 90 


644,003 97 

375,649 66 

48 52 


l 

2 
























57,347 98 




58,989 99 




57,885 33 




78,403 55 


1,019.702 15 




and BRIDGES. 

SCOTIA. 
















1,509 92 


1 


















BRUNSWICK. 


















2,368 34 


1 





















BEC. 


II. 




II. 




II. 




II. 




272 10 
10,000 00 

838 67 
20,453 50 

6,388 94 
685 86 

(a) 
17,466 20 
12,093 25 

8,335 82 
26,039 83 

3,127 00 


1 


















2 










276 


838 67 






3 










291 
291 


223 80 
2,456 40 


I 


271 


154 98 






276 
284 


251 67 


5 






fj 






292 


400 00 


7 














g 


















9 






247 


899 09 


276 


1,100 43 


292 


3,049 15 








11 























154 98 




899 09 


2,190 77 




6,129 35 


105,701 17 




i 










127 











4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A, 188a 



Expenditure on EOADS and BRIDGES 

ont 



Name of Work. 



De3 Joachims Bridge. 
Dunnville do 

Fort William Road... 



Ottawa Union Suspension Bridge (b) 

do Chaudiere Bridge 

Red River route and transportation 
service— Construction (6) 



Red River route and transportation 
service — Staff and repairs (6).... 

Windsor and Scugog Roads 

York Roads 



To.a.s, Ontario. 



County. 



Renfrew and Pontiac , 

Monck , 

Algoma 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts. 



Ottawa and Carleton. 



2,573 65 
209,195 38 



3,443 49 
20,000 00 

452,415 21 



521,778 01 

581 65 

1,644 96 



1,211,632 35 



1878. 



245 



239 



$ cts. 



107 37 



3,103 81 I 



3,211 18 



MANI 






Boats for transportation service 

Fort Garry Road 

do Bridge (over Red River). 
Red River route and transportation 

service — Construction (6) 

Red River route and transportation 

service — Staff and repairs (6).... 



Totals, Manitoba. 



72.193 01 

226,513 67 

2,967 10 

64,630 75 

74,539 71 



440,844 24 



239 



443 40 



443 40 



Abstract Statement of Expend 



Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 



Totals 



1,509 92 

2,368 34 

95j 719 61 

1,211,632 35 

440,844 24 



1,752,074 46 



607 37 

3,211 18 

443 40 



4,261 95 



Expenditure on TELEGKAPH LINE! 

CONSTRUi 

NOV. 






Land and Cable Telegraph Lines 
(Canso to Halifax, Meat Cove to 
Sydney, Low Point to Lingan)].... 



(ft) Proportion of expenditure. 



128 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 
ARIO. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 
for 15 Fears 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


s 

£1 

a 

55 




$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 

266 


% cts. 
750 69 


II. 

277 


$ cts. 
157 62 


% cts. 

908 31 

2,573 65 

209,195 38 

6,432 78 
20,000 00 

452,415 21 

526,496 64 

581 65 

1,644 96 


1 


















3 


?71 


154 98 






276 
284 


251 67 


291 
303 


2,475 27 


4 








% 


















6 


264 
*6f> 


271 26 


247 


T02 23 


278 


641 33 






7 








g 
















9 






















426 24 




702 23 


1,643 69 




2,632 89 


1,220,248 58 





TOBA. 



















72,193 01 

226,513 67 

2,967 10 

64,630 75 

74,983 11 


1 


















•J 


















3 


















4 


















t 


































441,287 64 























ture on ROADS and BRIDGES. 



















1,509 92 

2,368 34 

105,701 17 

1,220,248 58 

411,287 64 
























154 98 

426 24 




899 09 
702 23 




2,190 77 
1,643 69 




6,129 35 
2,632 89 


1 






— 
















581 22 


1,601 32 




3,834 46 


8,762 24 


1,771,115 65 





for the undermentioned years. 
TION. 

8COTIA. 



II. 

248 



15,695 85 



II. 

241 

275 



II. 

245 
246 
291 



34,770 03 



67,945 88 



129 



10 a— 9 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 1883 


I 


Expenditure on TELEQRAPH LINES 

CONSTRUC 

NEW 


; 

: 




Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July. 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 






* 


% 

a 


1878. 




1 


Land and Cable Telegraph Lines 
(proportion of expenditure), Grand 
Manan to Campobello and East 
Port 




$ cts. 




$ ctg 


















QUI 


i 


1 


Land and Cable Telegraph Lines, 
Lower St. Lawrence (proportion of 












2 


Telegraph Lines, North Shore of St. 
Lawrence (Baie St. Paul to Chi- 














Totals 


































m 


MAN 


■ 


1 






72 00 




















BRITIS] 


'' 


1 






9,044 00 


273 


19,797 22 












GENE 


liiL 


1 


Telegraph and Signal Service Gener- 
ally 


























Abstract Statement of Expenditure oi 


1 


i 














'> 














ft 














4 






72 00 
9,044 00 






■ 


5 


British Columbia 






19,797 22 




4i 










Totals 










. 




9,116 00 




19,797 25 


^ 














130 








s 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A, 1833 



for the undermentioned years. 
TIOTX— Concluded. 
BRUNSWICK. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


3 




$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 
241 


$ cts. 
13,840 00 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
13,940 00 


| 

















BEO. 







248 


5,241 76 


241 
275 


147,748 01 
12,940 51 


245 
291 


3,351 63 
11,676 83 


156,341 40 
24,617 34 


1 
2 


















5,241 76 




160,688 52 




15,028 46 


180,958 74 













TOBA. 



15,695 85 



5,241 76 



20,937 61 



17,480 00 

13,940 00 

160,688 52 



56,328 76 



10 a— 9J 



248,437 28 

~131 



34,770 03 



15,028 46 



4,709 51 
7,254 27 



72 00 1 



C0LUM3IA. 














275 


56,328 76 


291 


4,709 51 


89,879 49 


1 












ALLY. 














291 


7,254 27 


7,254 27 


1 
















TELEGRAPH LINES— Construction. 



67,945 88 

13,940 00 

180,958 74 

72 00 

89,879 49 

7,254 27 



360,050 38 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 




A. 188! 




Expenditure 


on TELEGRAPH LINES 

WORKIN( 

NOVj 




Name of Work. 


1 
County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




1 

C 


1878. 


i 


Land and Cable Telegraph Lines 
(proportion of expenditure) 




$ cts. 


II. 


$ cJ 
















PRINC 


i 






6,813 31 


247 


1,946 '<M 








NB1 


3 


Land and Cable Telegraph Lines 






















Q^j 


4 


Land and Cable Telegraph Lines 






















BRITia 


*> 


Telegraph Lines 




191,223 95 


247 


37,148 >| 
39,095 4l 




Grand Totals, Working Expenses 






198,037 26 






Expenditure a 
CONSTRll 

NOV! 


1 


Anet Island 




218 03 
6,905 80 

292 00 
28 81 

121 67 
2,768 00 

138 30 

39 13 

4,667 57 

3,221 02 






d 


Arichat 








3 


Harrington 








4 


Battery Point (or Lunenburg) 








fi 


Bird Island...... 








8 


Black Rock Point 








7 


Boar's Head 









fi 


Cape St. George 









M 


Cape St. Mary 




:::::' 




10 


Cariboo Island.. 




11 


Devil's Island 




310 14 

324 60 

12,295 09 

486 43 

3,389 84 






1? 


Ego: Island 








13 


Little Hope Island 








1 1 


Meagher's Point 








15 


Moser's Island 










Carried forward 











35,206 43 




| 












132 









46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1SS3 



for the undermentioned years — Concluded. 

EXPKNkE>3. 
SCOTIA. 





Year ended 30th June. 








Total 
















for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




187 . 




1880. 




1881. 






1882. 


d 

a 




















» 


1. 1 % 


cts. 


II. 1 % cts 


II. 


% 


cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


% cts. 




















304 


2,163 79 


2,163 79 


i 











EDWARD ISLAND. 



II. 

273 



1,946 66 



II. 

257 



1,946 66 



II. 

286 



1,946 66 



304 



1,946 66 



272 



28,270 73 



257 



35,578 30 



37,524 96 



286 



29,801 83 



31,748 49 



305 



38,646 87 



49,248 68 



16,546 61 



BRUNSWICK. 














304 


2,163 78 


2,163 78 


3 
















BEC. 








1 










304 


4,327 58 


4,327 58 


\ 


"1 












COLUMBIA. 



361,120 42 



386,322 18 



LIGHTHOUSES. 
TIOK 

SCOTIA. 



133 



218 03 


1 


6.905 80 


2 


292 00 


3 


28 81 


4 


121 67 


5 


2,768 00 


6 


138 30 


7 


39 13 


8 


4,667 57 


9 


3,221 02 


10 


310 14 


11 


324 60 


12 


12,295 09 


13 


486 43 


14 


3,389 84 


15 



35,206 43 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188$ 



Expenditure on LIGHT HOUSES 
CONSTRUCTION 

NOVA SCO 



Name of Work. 



Brought forward. 



Parrsboro' 

Peggy's Point 

Pomkett Island 

Port Hood Wharf.. 

Port Medway 

Pubnico 

Ram Rock Beacon. 



Totals. 



County. 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th Jrine, 

1877. 



$ cts. 
35,206 43 

1,254 45 

3,010 84 

1,590 43 

47 56 

68 13 
24 51 

39 96 



41,242 31 



1878. 



Cape Jourimain 

Maisonette 

Portage Island and Preston's Beach. 

Shediac Beacon Light 

St. John Beacon 

St. John River Beacon Light , 



Totals. 



4,060 34 

216 65 

850 00 

400 00 

272 78 

2,751 40 



8,551 17 



Bicquet Island 

Cap Rosier 

Paspebiac 

Point St. Laurent. 



Totals. 



48 00 

80 00 

216 81 

15,979 70 



16,324 51 



Byng Inlet 

Clapperton Island 

False Duck do 

Gibraltar Point 

Gull Island 

Killarney (Leading Light) . 

Little Current 

Michael's Point 

Point Pleasant 

St. Ignace 

Sulphur Island 



Totals. 



357 69 


605 20 


800 00 


55 00 


192 80 


660 20 


660 20 


454 94 


357 72 


605 03 


2,359 20 



7,107 98 



1 Cape Beale. 



134 



2,362 54 



46 Victoria. 




Sessional 


Papers (No. 


10.) 


A. 18S3 


for the undermentioned years — Continued. 

—Continued. 

TI A— Concluded. 


Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


I 


II. 


% cts. 


II. 


?' cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
35,206 43 

1,254 45 
3,010 84 
1,590 43 
47 56 
68 13 
24 51 
39 96 


1 


















?, 


.... 
















3 


. 
















4 


















5 


















6 


















7 


















8 


— 
































41,242 31 






















SRU 


NSWICK. 



















4,060 34 
216 65 
850 00 
400 00 
272 78 

2,751 40 



8,551 17 



IEC. 



















48 00 

80 00 

216 81 

15,979 70 


1 


















a 


















S 


















4 




































16,324 51 






















[JHO. 


















357 69 

605 20 

800 00 

55 00 

192 80 

660 20 

660 20 

454 94 

357 72 

, 605 03 

2,359 20 


1 


















? 


















3 


















4 


















5 


















6 


















7 


..;. 
















8 


.... 
















q 
















10 


















11 


































7,107 98 




_ 



















0LUMBIA. 


















... 
















2,362 54 


1 


. 




























135 











16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Abstract Statement of Expenditure 





Name of Work. 


County. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 






6 

s 


1878. 


i 






$ cts 

41,242 31 
8,551 17 

16,324 51 
7,107 98 
2,362 54 


II. 


$ cts. 


') 










3 










.1 








5 










Totals 








75,588 51 



















Expenditure on MISCELLANEOUS 


1 


Surveys and Inspections — 




27,785 28 

1,237 20 

33,487 56 

47,318 88 

125,638 31 


II. 

240 
240 
240 
240 
240 


2,794 80 
3,494 76 
5,589 58 
2,534 92 
13,090 68 


•> 


Prince Edward Island 




■} 


New Brunswick 




4 






*> 


Ontario 




« 


Manitoba 




7 






681 99 
369 50 






8 


Briiish Columbia 








q 


Generally , 






Totals, Surveys 












236,518 72 


27,504 74 i 




Survey Coasts Capes Tormentine 
and Traverse — 
Prince Edward Island 




TO 








11 


New Brunswick 












Totals 




















Arbitrations. 






240 




n 


53,276 11 


6,883 85 I 




Tug Service between Montreal and 
Kingston — 
Quebec 




13 


48,151 43 
48,151 41 




14 


Ontario 










Totals, Tug Service 

Agent and Contingencies, B.C 










96,302 84 












15 


5,055 35 


247 


2,687 55 




Relief to Fishermen, Labrabor 




16 










Sundries — 

Stationery, &c 










17 


1,365 70 


245 
246 


2,790 52 








Grand Totals. Miscellaneous 


392,518 72 


39,866 66 


k— 







136 



46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 


10.) 


A. 1833 


011 LIG-HT HOUSES— Construction. 


[ — 

Year ended 30th June. 


Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1 

3 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

41,242 31 
8,551 17 

16,3 '4 51 
7,107 98 
2,362 54 


1 


















2 


















3 


.., 
















4 



















5 




































75,588 51 






















for the undermentioned years. 


II. 

264 
264 
264 
264 
264 


7,983 91 
1,683 30 
4,130 79 
7,759 78 
11,860 09 


II. 

247 
247 
247 
247 
247 


4,185 56 

3,002 28 

2,620 44 

13,963 59 

10,116 48 


II. 

276 
276 
276 
276 
276 
276 


237 ?0 

87 80 

150 00 

8,284 92 

10,916 40 

1,087 50 


II. 




42,987 35 

9,505 34 

45,978 37 

96,909 71 

173,781 51 

4,056 84 

681 99 

1,452 02 

19,270 34 


1 






2 






3 


292 
292 
292 


17,047 62 
2,159 55 
2,969 34 


4 
5 
6 










7 










276 

276 


260 63 
3,764 14 


292 

292 


821 89 
4,061 69 


8 






247 


11,444 51 


9 








33,417 87 




45,332 86 




24,789 19 




27,060 09 


394,623 47 




?,65 


2,500 00 
2,500 00 














2,500 00 
2,500 00 


10 
11 




































5,000 00 


248 












5,000 00 




264 














7,261 22 


10,035 38 


277 
278 


9,697 53 


293 


3,901 61 


91,055 60 


1 


















48,151 43 
48,151 41 


1<* 


















14 
































96,302 84 




272 


















2,495 70 


256 


2,818 85 


285 


1,690 90 


303 


2,195 84 


i6,944 19 


15 










277 


437 24 






437 24 


16 








270 

271 


2,056 00 












6,211 22 


17 













50,230 79 




58,187 09 


36,614 86 




33,157 44 


610,575 56 














137 











46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Statement showing Amounts contributed by Municipalities, &c, towards 

Statements, from 1st July, 



32 



Name of Work. 



Public Buildings — 

Quebec Citadel "Cliff" (Corporation of the City of Quebec) 

do Fortifications (Her Majesty the Queen's Gift) 

Ottawa Drill Shed (Corporation of the City of Ottawa) 



Totals, Public Buildings. 



Harbours — 

Bayfield (Municipality of Stanley) 

Cobourg (Commissioners, Harbour Trust, Cobourg). 

Collingwood (Northern Railway Co.) 

Goderich (Municipality, Township of Goderich) 

Meaford ( do St. Vincent) 

Rondeau (County Council, Kent) 



Totals, Harbours. 



Rivbrs— 

Napanee, Ontario. 
Salmon do 



Totals, Rivers. 



Roads and Bridges— 

Portage du Fort Bridge (Grant, Ontario Government). 

Grand Totals 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



cts. 



10,000 00 
25,507 49 
28,268 26 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 



83,775 75 



5,000 00 
2,400 00 



7,400 00 



5,500 00 



96,675 75 



1878. 



cts. 



138 



16 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



the Construction of the undermentioned Works, and included in previous- 
1867, to 30th June, 1882. 





Year ended 30th June. 




Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


6 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 


$ cts. 


II. 

247 
246 


$ cts. 

2,500 00 
2,433 33 




$ cts. 


■ $ cts . 

2,500 00 
2,433 33 
5,000 00 


1 












*? 


276 
.... 


2,050 00 


228 


2,950 00 






ft 








2,050 00 




2,950 00 




4,933 33 






9,933 33 


























10,000 00 
25,507 49 
28,268 26 
10,000 00 
10,000 00 
300 00 


A 


















fi 


















f. 


















7 


















8 


" 












274 


300 00 


fl 




























300 00 


84,075 75 


































5,000 00 
2,400 00 


10 


















11 


— 
































7,400 00 






































5,500 00 


lfl 


: 


















2,050 00 


2,950 00 




4,933 33 




300 00 


106,909 08 





139 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1S83 



Comparative Statement of Expenditure on PUBLIC 



Name of Work. 



Railways — Oonstructiou 

do Working Expenses. 

Canals — Construction 

do Staff, Repairs, Ac 



Totals, Railways and Canals. 



Public Buildings— Construction 

do Repairs, Ac 

Harbours and Breakwaters 

Improvements of Rivers 

Dredges — Construction 

do Repairs 

Dredging 

Slides and Booms— Construction 

do do Staff and Repairs. 

Roads and Bridges 

Telegraph Lines — Construction 

do Working Expenses. 
Lighthouses — Construction 



Miscellaneous — 

Surveys 

Survey Coasts Capes Tormentine and Traverse. 

Arbitrations 

Tug Service between Montreal and Kingston .. 

Relief of Fishermen, Labrador 

Agent and Contingencies, B.C 

Sundries 



Totals, Public Works. 
Grand Totals 



Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 



$ cts. 

33,476,607 70 

10,059,936 93 

10,646,249 18 

3.353,120 32 



57,535,914 13 



4,917,495 77 

1,601,384 55 

2,369,079 06 

299,456 04 

271,461 21 



300,273 86 

271,333 03 

713,407 57 

1,752,074 46 

9.116 00 

198,037 26 

75,588 51 



236,518 72 



53,276 11 
96,302 84 



5,055 35 
1,365 70 



13,171,226 04 



70,707,140 17 



1878. 



$ ctaj; 

2,643,741 7a! 

2,032,873 OH 

3,843,338 62 

310,299 23 



8,860,252 6ffl 



518,908 71 

282,380 if 

225,066 21 

28,843 71 

1,860 



75,580 
591 
53,667 
4,261 91 



i 



39,090 4 



27.504 7 
"6,863 j| 



2,687 £ 
2,790 ty 



1,270,122 | 



10,130,374 1 



(a) Including $ 9,933 33 contributed by Municipalities, &c, see page 139. 

(6) do 84,075 75 do do do 

(cj do 7,400 00 do do do 

(>/) do 5,500 00 do Local Government, Ontario, see page 139. 

Total... . $106,909 08 



(<?) Shows only expenditure incurred through Public Works Department, see page 173. 



140 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



WORKS and BUILDINGS for the undermentioned years. 



Year ended 30th June 






Total 
for 15 Years 

ended 

30th June, 

1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


o 

a 
1 


$ cts. 

2,507,053 71 

2,233,496 34 

3,064,098 61 

335,402 06 


$ cts. 

6,109,599 14 

1,851,489 26 

2,123,366 34 

379,503 55 


$ cts. 

5,577,236 73 

2,220,421 39 

2,100,242 78 

383,963 35 


$ cts. 

5,176,832 81 

2,311,423 22 

1,670,268 74 

446,969 14 


$ cts. 

55,491,071 82 

20,709,640 19 

23,447,564 27 

5,239,257 67 


i 

2 
3 

4 


8,140,050 72 


10,463,958 29 


10,281,864 25 


9,605,493 91 


104,887,533 95 




374,109 76 

351,077 47 

188,288 07 

35,424 61 

15,000 00 


445,344 26 

296,603 62 

93,714 25 

51,603 13 

' 13,784*63 
73,368 07 
11,972 45 
58,989 99 
1,601 32 
20,937 61 
37,524 96 


512,882 31 

215,975 34 

167,786 77 

49,548 80 

15,221 57 

14,097 67 

46,073 23 

7,697 01 

57,885 33 

3,834 46 

248,437 28 

31,748 49 


544,032 73 

309,189 18 

297,406 84 

63,U5 79 

6,386 50 

21,406 91 

64,611 42 

13,116 49 

78,403 55 

8,762 24 

61,762 27 

49,248 68 


(a) 7,312,773 62 
3,056,610 29 

(b) 3,341,341 26 
(c) 528,322 07 

309,929 28 

49,289 21 

642,478 95 

305,110 26 

1,019,702 15 

(d) 1,771,115 65 

360,050 38 

386,322 18 

(6)75,588 51 

394623 47 

5^000 00 

91,055 60 

96,302 84 

437 24 

16.944 19 

6,212 22 


5 

6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


82,572 18 
400 00 

57,347 98 
581 22 

19,797 22 

30,667 39 


11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
1« 
17 


33,417 87 
5,000 00 
7,261 22 


45,332 86 


24,789 19 


27,060 09 


18 
19 


10,035 38 


9,697 53 


3,901 51 


20 
?1 


1; 




437 24 
1,690 90 




22 


2,495 70 
2,056 00 


2,818 85 


2,195 84 


23 
24 










1,205,496 69 


1,163,631 38 


1,407,803 12 


1,550,930 04 


19,769,209 37 




9,345,547 41 


11,627,589 67 


11,689,667 37 


11,156,423 95 


124,656,743 32 

















141 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 181 



<3-ener.il Abstract of Expenditure on PUBLIC WORKS and BUILDINt 



Works. 



Intercolonial Railway— Construction 

do Working Expenses 

Government Railways, Maritime Provinces— Con- 
struction m""i" 

Government Railways, Maritime Provinces— Work- 
ing Expenses 

Coteau Landing Railway Bridge 

Pacific Railway— Construction 

do Working Expenses 

Canals—Construction 

do Staff and Repairs 



Totals, Railways and Canals 



Public Buildings — Construction 

do Repairs, &c 

Harbours and Breakwaters 

Improvements of Rivers 

Dredges — Construction 

do Repairsj 

Dredging 

Slides and Booms — Construction 

do Staff and Repairs 

Roads and Bridges 

Telegraph Lines— Construction 

do Working Expenses 

Lighthouses — Construction ... 

Miscellaneous, viz :— 

Surveys 

Survey Coasts, Capes Tormentine and Traverse 

Arbitrations 

Tug Service between Montreal aud Kingston 

Agent and Contingencies, British Columbia .... 

Sundries , 



Nova Scotia. 



$ cts, 

6,637,722 09 
4,800,301 44 

1,801,461 89 

1,406,933 37 



496,797 80 
23,771 21 



15,166,987 80 



Entered 
Confederation. 



1st July, 1873. 



P. E. Island. 



$ cts. 



352,255 49 
1,539,556 31 



1,891,811 80 



164.110 00 

64,817 31 

760,603 20 

8.676 50 

120,0*4 65 

11,193 29 

1217,949 56 



Totals, Public Works. 
Grand Totals 



J. 509 92 
66,945 88 

2,163 79 
41,242 31 

42,987 35! 



75,253 68 

19,879 55 

177,283 15 



23,582 07 

3,878 06 

181,321 25 



New 

Brunswic 



$ el 

ll,475,28cj| 
8.402, 




44,38 



16,546 61 



1,502,243 76 



16,669,231 56 



9.505 34 
2, 500 00 



409,749 71 



2,301,561 51 



21,570,22(1 



1,248,67* 

46,820 

463,35!i» 

67,54.'M) 

1 05, 04 a 

9,56M 

1180,2811 






2,36 
14,94i 

2,1678 

8,55." 

45,97 i. 
2,50* 



2,197,7» 
23, 768,01 il 



a Including $1,786 20 charged to " Consolidated Fund." See Public Accounts 1881-82, Parti., 
h, c, d, «,/— For remarks, see pages 140 and 141. 

f Rave been unable to apportion this expenditure to the several services on account of which it(ts 
* Includes only such of the expenditure for Dredging as could not be apportioned to any spi* 1 

The above Statements, which are a compilation both from the "Public Accounts " and the BJJli 
in the Public Accounts for 1881-82. 

Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, 20th January, 1883. 



142 



46 Victoria. 



•sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



from 1st July, 1867 (date of Confederation), to 30th June, 1882. 





Ontario. 


Entered Confederation. 


Miscellaneous 

not 
Apportioned 

to 
any of the 
Provinces. 


Total 

to 

30th June, 

1882. 




Quebec. 


15th July, 1870. 


20th July, 
1871. 


M 




Manitoba. 
$ cts. 


North-West 
Territories. 


British 
Columbia. 


$ cts. 

8,351,014 34 

3,418,578 72 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 

26,464,017 42 

16,620,888 18 

2,978,406 66 

3,770,344 14 

522 00 

a 26.048,125 74 

318,407 87 

23,447,564 27 

5,239,257 67 


1 












2 












?> 














4 


522 00 












5 




13,116,950 42 

73 ,5*1 0,2*23 68 
3,(64,657 S3 


5.641,181 85 
318,407 87 


2,715,811 86 
""32,67565 


4,574,181 61 




b 


M "9,353,693" 94 
2,095,077 47 


""9, 885* 6 7 
55,751 16 


7 

8 




9 


5,959.589 72 


2,748,487 51 






23,218,786 47 


29,691.831 93 


4,574,181 61 


65,636 8?. 

104,633 33 

667 05 

6,083 35 


104.887,533 95 




1,747,702 46 
353,308 05 
318,505 82 


3,157,545 30 

2,497,058 41 

1,607,183 00 

105,612 77 

38,058 37 

6,216 48 

*46,928 78 

44,299 27 

375,649 66 

1,220,248 58 


326.247 47 

53,' 194 16 

223 39 

17,364 96 


228,, 35 40 
. 6.9< 8 65 


260,473 98 

14,051 21 

8,099 76 

32,501 53 

7,697 96 

9,047 37 

f76.395 01 


b 7,312,773 62 

3,056,610 29 

c 3,341,341 26 

d 528,322 07 

309,929 28 

49,289 21 

642,478 95 

305,110 26 

1,019,702 15 

e 1,771,115 65 

360^50 38 

386.322 18 

J 75,588 51 

394,623 47 

5,000 00 

91,055 60 

96,302 84 

16,944 19 

6,649 46 


10 

LI 
13 


295,906 43 

15,501 57 

9,385 07 

*39,603 17 

260,810 99 


714 48 


13 
14 









15 






16 








17 


644,003 97 
5,701 17 








48 52 


18 


72 00 






19 


0,958 74 




89,879 49 
2,362 54 
1,452 02 


7,254 27 


20 


4',327 58 






21 


16,324 51 


7,107 98 
173,781 51 






2? 


96,909 71 


4,056 84 


681 99 


19,270 34 


23 

94 












91,056 60 


a 5 


48,151 42 


48,151 42 








26 






16,944 19 




»7 






28 














4,137,537 90 


9,327,841 53 










19,769,209 37 






39,019,673 46 


6,802,036 18 


2,984,828 03 


5,454,207 09 


300,861 51 


124,656,743 32 





Falio 295. 

been;incurrecU 
work. 



of this Department, have been,^in part, summarized by the Deputy Minister of Finance to be embodied 

O. DIONNE, 

Accountant. 



143 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1885 



Expenditure on Account of WORKS authorized by Special 





Name of Work. 


Amount 
Authorized. 


Expenditure 

from 

1st July, 1867, 

to 

30th June, 

1877. 




a 

.a 
S 


1878. 


1 


St. Lawrence River, deepening between Quebec 
and Montreal — 

36 Vic. cap. 60 $1,500,000 00 

45 do 44 . 280,000 00 


$ cts. 

81,780,000 00 

1,825,000 00 
500,000 00 

250,000 00 


$ cts. 
858,000 00 
(a)723,000 00 


IX. 
IX. 


$ ts. 
130,000 00 
75,000 00 






•2 


Quebec Harbour Improvement — 

36 Vic. , cap. 62 $1,200,000 00 

43 do 17 250,000 00 




45 do 47 375,000 00 


3 


Levis Graving Dock — 

38 Vic, cap. 56 


4 


Esquimalt Graving Dock, B.C. — 
37 Vic, cap. 17) 




43 do 15 J 

Totals 










4,355,000 00 


1,581,000 00 




205,000 00 | 







(a) Exclusive of the sum of $1,140, being amount of a cheque issued in 1873, and now cancelled. 

ERRATA. 





Line or Item. 


Page. 


From top 

of 

Page. 


From 
bot- 




tom of 
Page. 


17 


Item 16... 


, 


17 


do 16... 




17 


do 10... 




21 


do 2... 




38 


do 5... 




45 


do 2... 


11 


45 


do 2... 


11 


45 


do 11... 


2 


46 




1 
5 


68 


Item 7... 


73 


3rd line... 




86 


Item 14... 




87 


do 14... 




88 


do 27... 




88 


do 2... 


13 


108 


do 7... 


12 


108 


do 12... 


7 


U2 


do 35... 




112 


do 35... 




112 


do 43.., 




117 


do 3... 




117 


do 18... 




138 


do 11... 





Instead of 



1877. 
Quebec Post Office $11,186 95 

Total. 

do 105,088 00 

Montreal Post Office 460,426 38 

1877. 

Fort Pelly Barracks 15,000 00 

Chicoutimi River, Saguenay Pier 

1877. 
Chateauguay River $1,602 99 

Total. 

do 3,283 79 

St. Francis River 14,218 51 

$2,000.00 

Salmon River 

1st July, 1870 

$460,426.38— 1st Column 

$490,593.36— Total do 

$105,088.46— 1st and last Column , 

Belleville, Hastings East 

Beloeil, County of Montmngny 

Chenal du Moine, Yamaska 

Presqu'Isle, Georgian Bay 

do County of Grey 

Trenton, County of Hastings. 

Total. 

Chateauguay River $3,283 79 

St. Francis River 14,218 51 

Salmon River 



Read 



Montreal Post Office $11,186 95 

Quebec Post Office $93,901 45 

Montreal Post Office 471,613 33 

Buildings at Fort MacLeod, &c. 
Chicoutimi Pier, Saguenay River. 

St. Francis River $1,602 99 j 

$ 1,680 80. 

15,821 50. 
2,400 00. 
Thames River. 
15th July, 1870. 
$471,613 33. 

501,780 31. 
93,901 45. 
Belleville, Hastings West. 
Beloeil, County of Vercheres. 
Chenal du Moine, Richelieu, 
Presqu'Isle, Lake Ontario. 



do 
Trenton 

Total. 
$1,680 80. 
15,821 50. 
Thames River. 



East Northumberland. 
do 



144 



4b Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Acts of Parliament, from 1st July, 1867, to 30th June, 1882. 



Year ended 30th June. 


Total 

for 15 years 

ended 

30th June, 1882. 




1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1 

55 




$> cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 




$ cts. 


$ cts. 




XIII. 


178,000 00 


XVII. 


140,000 00 


•..«••••• 





XIX. 


194,000 00 


1,500,000 00 




XHI. 


150,000 00 


XVII. 


200,000 00 


XVII. 


202,000 00 


XIX. 


55,000 00 


1,405,000 00 




XIII. 


50,000 00 


XVII. 


75,000 00 


XVII. 


175,000 00 


XIX. 


50,000 00 


350,000 00 


3 










XVII. 


9,891 00 


XXIII 


[37,769 22 


47,660 22 


4 




378,000 00 




415,000 00 




386,891 00 




336,769 22 


3,302,660 22 





145 



4C Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



APPENDIX No. 2, 



REPORT ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. 
BY THOMAS FULLER, CHIEF ARCHITECT, 



Chief Architect's Office, 

Ottawa, 30th December,~1882. 

Sir, — Pursuant to instructions contained in your letter of the 26th August, 1882, 
I have the honor to transmit a report descriptive of the several public buildings of 
the Dominion, and of other works which have come under the control of this office, 
embracing especially the period from the 1st July, 1867, to the 1st July, 1882. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

THOS. FULLER, 

Chief Architect. 
F. II. Ennis, Esq., Secretary, 

Department of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



10 a— 104- 



!G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1SS3 



PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 



HALIFAX. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

This building occupies a frontage of 125 feet on both Cheapside and Georgij 
streets and 55 feet on Hollis street and Bedford Eow, and comprises basement, grounc 
iirst and second floor. 

The basement contains the heating apparatus ; the Post Office Department 
occupies nearly one half of the building from ground floor upwards, the Custom! 
lonss rooms and Collectors office take up the remaining portion of the ground flooi 
and on the succeeding floors are the Inland .Revenue, Eeceiver General's offices an<j 
Provincial Museum. 

The walls are of cut stone and the roof of wood covered with slate. 

The style of architecture is Eenaissance simply treated and the favorable pos:| 
tion of the building gives it prominence. 

The building is heated by steam, and supplied with gas and water from th| 
city services. 

Architect Mr. D. Stirling- 

V- PENITENTIARY. 

This prison was transferred to the Dominion by the Provincial Government cl 
Nova Scotia at the Union. 

The building and yard cover a superficial area of 2,423 square yards. The prisol 
consists of ninety cells in three ranges of thirty each, with administrative offices, dinin| 
hall, Warden's quarters, etc., attached. 

The blacksmiths' shop, tailors' shop and carpenters' shop and a warehouse anj 
store room are in tbe yard and are constructed of wood. 

The building ceased to be used for penitentiary purposes on the transfer of tb| 
prisoners to the Maritime Penitentiary at Dorchester, ]ST. B., and was proclaimed b{ 
Order in Council to be no longer a penitentiary. 

DRILL SHED. 

There is an Infantry drill shed 110 feet by 58 feet, an artillery drill shed 
feet by 58 feet, and five armories which together are 2tf feet by 54 feet, all in gc 
condition and situated on a lot 232 feet by 152 feet, fronting on Spring Garden Roi 

LAWLORS ISLAND QUARANTINE STATION. 

This station is near the entrance of the harbour, about four miles from the Cil 
of Halifax. 

This Island is 147 acres in extent, partly wooded and is easily accessible^by boat 
being about 200 yards from the east shore. 

The Island is divided into throe districts,'the sick, the convalescent' and 
healthy. 

The buildings are of wood on stone foundations, and comprise two hospital 
each 40 feet by 20 feet, one store shed 30 foot by 20 feet, a steward's reside/tee, ou 
■buildings, etc. 

The wharf is of wood. 

148 



1 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883- 

PICTOU. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

This building is situated at the steamboat landing on the Pictou Ride of the* 
ictou Extension Bailway. Contract for construction was entered into during 1874-^5, 
id completed and the building occupied in 1876-77. 

It covers an area of 2,750 square feet and is three stories in height. 

The external walls are brick with stone dressings, on stone foundations, and the 
)f is of wood. 

Basement is appropriated for tide waiters room and water closets, the ground 
>r*for Customs long room, Collector's office, Locker's room, and Weights and 
[easures offices, and the^first floor shipping office and Inland Eevenue offices. 

Building heated by stoves. 

Architects, Messrs. Stirling & Dewar. 

QUARANTINE STATION. 

Is situated on Pictou Harbour, on a lot known as the Marine Hospital and 
Quarantine grounds, and is 35 acres in extent. 

It consists of a two storey hospital, 40 feet by 70 feet, and a steward's house, 
>th of wood, also a one storey pest house of stone, consisting of a ward and a nurses" 

LUNENBURG MARINE HOSPITAL. 

In 1878-79 a plot of land, two acres in extent was acquired facing Lunenburg 
[arbour, and fronting roads to Battery Point and Blue Rocks, the construction of the 
tilding commenced in the same year and completed in 1880-81. 

The hospital is on the cottage principle, and is constructed of wood on a stone 
mndation. 

The wards are one story in height and the house steward's residence two stories, 
le place is L shaped, with the residence at the angle, and has two wards, one con- 
ining six beds and the other four ; heated by stoves ; plans and specifications pre- 
'ed by this Department. 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building, 90 feet by 45 feet, situated on a lot bounded on the north by 
Townsend street, on the east by Hopson street and the south by Cumberland street, 
and is in a good state of preservation. 



I 



SYDNEY. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 



0^1 The building is situated at Battery Point and covers an area of 2,200 superficial 
feet, is constructed of wood on a stone foundation, with a cellar under. It is L shaped 
and affords accommodation, in one wing for the administrative portion, and in the 
; other an hospital ward for twenty patients. 

Heated by stoves. 

Plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 

YAEMOTJTH. 

BUKER'S ISLAND QUARANTINE STATION AND MARINE HOSPITAL. 

Bunker's Island has a superficial area of 32 acres, and has no buildings except 
those existing at time of purchase. 

* 149 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Thsre is a steward's house of wood, one and a-half stories in height, with two 
rooms on each floor. It was built forty years bince and is in a dilapidated condition. 
There is also a good frame barn. 

BELLTOWN, (COUNTY OF KING'S.) 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden shed, 90 feet by 45 feet, situated on one-quarter acre lot, the property of 
the Dominion Government. 

Building in a poor state of repair. 

WINDSOK (HANTS COUNTY). 

DRILL SHED. 

Shed 120 feet by 50 feet including an armoury, situated on the road leading to 
Fort Edward, and is in a fair condition excepting the roof, which requires repairs. 

BIVEK PHILIP (CUMBERLAND COUNTY). 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building, 75 feet by 40 feet. 

AMHERSTj(CUMBERLAND COUNTY). 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building 80 feet by 45 feet, situated on a lot 100 feet by 60 feet. 
Prince Arthur street; built in 1872, and now dilapidated. 

MACCAN AND RIVER HBBERT (CUMBERLAND COUNTY). 

DRILL SHED. 

Shed, 80 feet by 40 feet, situated at the corner formed by roads from Mace* 
Station, Joggins Mines, Lower Cove, Han owfield and River Hebert. Building in ne< 
of repairs. ^ 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND, 



OHARLOTTiSTOWN. 

DOMINION BUILDING. 

■ This building is in the public square facing Richmond street and flanked bj 
Market street on the ii*_>ht, and the Provincial Parliament House (Colonial Building; 
on the lefr, having Grafton street in rear. It covers an area of 5,560 square feet- 
and consists of a basement, ground, first and second floor. The basement is devotee 
to heating service, and caretakers' room, the .around floor to the Post Oflice an*j 
Savings Bank, the first and second floor to the Custom House and keepers' apart, 
ments. 

The walls are of brick, covered with mastic and on a stone foundation, and thj 
floors and roof are of wood. 

Previous to the union of Prince Edward island with the Dominion, this buildinj 
was occupied by the (-iovernrnent of that Province. 

Heating is bv steam. (Jas is supplied from the City service. 

150 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers p'j. 10.) A. 1883 



DRILL SHED. 



A wooden shed 180 feet by 60 feet, with an armoury 75 feet by 20 feet, situated on 
Kent and West Streets, and in a good condition. 

QUARANTINE STATIOW. 

This depot is situated at Southport, and consists of a single 1J storey wooden 
lilding with stone foundations. There is a parlour, a small ward, and a kitchen on 
le ground floor ; in the attic there are two wards, and a keeper's bedroom. 
Heated by stoves. 

GEORGETOWN. 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building, 80 feet by 40 feet, requiring repairs. 

SOUBIS. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

A site was purchased to the north of the town and the hospital erected during 
W5-76. 

The building is of wood. The main floor contains nurses' rooms, a kitchen, a 
scullery, a larder, a pantry, an entrance hall, and a ward for eight beds. On the first 
floor are three bedrooms. 

Warmed by stoves. 

Drawings prepared by this Department. 



PEOVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 
FBEDERICTON. 

POST OFFICE. 

This building has been erected upon ordnance property at the corner of Queen 
land Carleton Streets. 

Works were commenced during 1878-79 and the building was completed and 
occupied in 1880-81. 

The external walls are of brick with stone dressings, on a foundation of stone ; 
nternal walls of brick and wood. 

The building consists of basement, ground, first and attic floors. 

The basement contains furnaces, fuel and store rooms. The ground floor is 
pccupied as a Post Office, the first floor as Custom House and Inland Eevenue Offices, 
and the attic floor as caretakers' apartments. 

The Weights and Measures Offices and the Examining Warehouse are in a 
detached one storey building in rear. 

The main building is warmed by hot air furnaces. 

Water supply from well in basement. 

Plans, &c, prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Mi*. D. E. Dunham. 

STONE BARRACKS. 

A group of buildings situated between Queen Street and the River St. John, 
which were transferred to the Dominion Government by the War Department on 
the 9th March, 1871, and comprising the following, viz. : 

151 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 






1. Officers 7 Quarters. — A stono three storey building, 93 feet 6 inches by 35 feet, 
with a slate roof, and a verandah on the west side the entire height of the front, built to! 
accommodate 10 officers and now considerably out of repair. Attached to this are officer 
and stores and in connection with it various detached outbuildings. 

2. Soldiers' Barracks.— A stone three storey building, 161 feet by 28 feet, witBl 
elated roof, and a verandah on one side the entire length and height ot the building,; 
now slightly out of repair. Built to accommodate 192 men. 

3— Guard House.— A one storey stone building 40 feet square, with a wooden roofj 
4 — Armoury. — A wooden two storey building, 36 feet by 22 feet. 

PARK BARRACKS. 

This was transferred to the Dominion Government by the War Department 9th.] 
March, 1871, and is situated on the corner of George and .Regent streets, comprising 
the following, viz. : 

I— Soldiers' Barracks.— A wooden two storey building, 113 feet by 31 feet. 

2 — Guard House. — A wooden one storey building, 26 feet by 20 feet, and ii 
need of ropair. 

3 — Officers' Quarters. — Thirty-seven feet by 22 feet, now in fair condition. 

4 — Magazine. — A one storey stone bomb-proof building, 24 feet square, and] 
somewhat out of repair ; adjacent to this is a sifting room, 8 feet 4 inches square, o:| 
brick, with slate roof and stone steps, and in good condition. 

In addition to the above there are the following buildings, now much dilapidated 

5— Gun Shed. 

6 — Engine House. 

7 — Cook House. 

8 — Artillery Quarters. 

Also wood shed, latrines, ball alley, &c. 

ST. JOHN. 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 

The building formerly used as a Custom House which was destroyed by fire 20tl) 
June, 1877, was situated on a lot of land between Prince William Street, Water Stree 
and Murder Hill. It was commenced in 1840 and occupied in 1842, and was originall; 
a private enterprise, but was finally purchased by the Dominion Government on th 
4th February, 1870. 

Instructions were issued for the construction of a new Custom House on th 
original site in August, 1877, and contracts for the foundations immediately entere« 
into; and in the following year contracts for the superstructure; and the building; 
completed and occupied in 1880-81. 

The frontages on Prince William and Water Streets are 200 feet each, and o 
Murder Hill ninety feet. The style is classic in character. The elevations o:| 
Prince William and Water Streets are three and four stories in height respective! 
with mansard roof. 

The elevation on Prince William Street is relieved by slightly projecting centr 
and pavilion. The sky line of this elevation is broken by a central dome and th; 
roofs. f«*f^ 

The Water Street elevation has a central and two end projections, giving thj 
plan of building the form of a letter E, the central projection being carried one store 
higher. 

The foundations are of granite, and the walls above are faced with native san(< 
stone in ashlar, the various heights of floors being marked by moulded strings an! 
cornices. 

The projections on Prince William Street contain the entrance. On this facadj 
the pilasters which divide the wall surface into bays are carried from the grounj 
level to the underside of main cornice in three orders. 

152 



: 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883" 



The main doorway is boldly treated, being carried up through two stories. 

The windows generally have moulded imposts and arohivolts, with carved, 
keystone. Each end elevation has a square tower, placed at junction of higher and 
lower — level roofs, the lines of which are carried up to a height of 120 feet, finished 

i ; with balconies, on one of which is a signal apparatus, and on the other a time ball. 
The frame of roof is iron with wood sheathing, the slopes covered with slates 
and the decks with asphaltum. 

The sub-basement is occupied by heating apparatus, fuel, dredge- warehouse, 
stores, etc.; the upper basement by tide-waiters', appraisers' rooms and sailors' hall. 

On ground floor are the Customs long room, Collector of Customs and staff, 
Clearance offices, Weights and Measures rooms, Excise, Agriculture and Steamboat 
Inspection, the first-floor containing Marine and Fisheries, Public Works and Gas In- 
spection, and in attic are the apartments of caretaker, etc. 

The building is divided into three sections, separated by brick walls reaching 
from foundation to roof. 

Safes of brick are constructed for the use of the various Departments occupying 
the building. Heating is by steam ; gas and water supplied by the city services. 

Local Architects — McKean and Fairweather. 

POST OFFICE. 

In 18*72 a lot of land was acquired, 50 ft. 6 in. by 90 ft., facing on Prince 
William, Princess and Water streets, and adjoining the property of the Bank of iNew 
Brunswick, and a Post Office erected thereon which covered the entire plot. 

Its construction was commenced in 18*71-72 and completed and the building 
occupied in 1875-76. 

The style adopted was Italian ; the outer walls facing on streets were of stone 
and the remaining walls brick, it consisted of a sub-basement, basement, ground, 
first, second and attic floors, all occupied by the local Post Office. Local Architect, 
Mr. M. Stead. 

The above building was destroyed by the great fire of St. John, on the 20th June, 
1877, and immediate steps were taken to replace it by a new building on the original 
site. 

Contracts were entered into for this work in 1877-78 and the building completed 
and occupied in 1880-81. 

The plans of the burned building, being considered suitable, were but slightly 
altered, the elevations being somewhat varied from the original ones, but the same 
character retained. • 

The external walls are of the same material as those of the original structure. 

The floors are of iron joist ing with brick arches between, levelled up with con- 
te and covered with wood. The internal walls are of brick, and the roof of wood 
vered with galvanized iron and slates. 

The style is Classic in character, the walling above basement is faced with ashlar; 
oulded cornices divide the various stories, that beneath the attic having elaborate 
brackets, medallions and panels. The principal entrance is on Prince William 
street front, the centre of which projects slightly and contains three doors for public 
entrances to Post Office. 

Above this entrance the wall is divided by pilasters and crowned by an orna- 
mental clock pediment relieving the roof. 

Building heated by steam. Gas and water supplied from the city services. 

Architect, Mr. M. Stead. 

SAVINGS BANK. 

This building is situated on a lot 100 feet by 55 feet, at the intersection of 
Princess and Canterbury streets, which was the site of the previous building 
lestroyed by fire on 20th June, 1877. 

153 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10,) A, 1883 



The contract work was commenced in 1878-79 and completed, and the building 
occupied in the year following. 

The building is 50 feet by 41 feet; the walls fronting on streets are of stone with 
brick backing and the remaining walls are of brick. 

The architectural treatment is Italian in character. The walling is coursed 
ashlar on a rock faced basement. The main fronts are divided into bays by pilasters 
in two orders, the lower, which is Corinthian, extends through ground and first floors, 
the upper is composite with appropriate strings entablature and balustrading. 

The roof is of wood covered with asphaltum. 

The basement contains the caretaker's living rooms and accommodation for the 
heating apparatus. On the ground floor are the Manager's rooms, banking room, 
and a large vault; on first and second floors are the remaining offices. 

Heating by steam. G-as and water supplied irom the city services. 

Local Architects, Messrs. McKean and Fairweather. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This building is in course of erection in the grounds connected with the presen 
Marine Hospital, a dilapidated wooden structure, which it is intended to replace. 

The portions under contract are the administrative block, having basement, t 
storeys and attic, and one ward of two storeys and a basement. The foundations ar 
stone, the walls brick and the floor and roof wood ; the roof being covered with sla 
on slopes and galvanized iron on flats. 

In the basement will be a boiler room, a fuel cellar, a kitchen, a larder, a pantry 
storage baths, etc. The ground floor is to have a waiting-room, a surgery, conval 
©scents' dining and sitting rooms, nurses rooms and a ward 28 feet by 48 feet; the 
second floor is to contain surgeon's, matron's, steward's and nurse's rooms and a ware 
similar to that on ground floor. The attic will be devoted to bedrooms, etc. 

The plans admit of the addition of two extra wards, making, when complete ilia 
T shaped plan. 

Architect, Mr. D. E. Dunham. 



: 



PENITENTIARY* 

Originally this was used as a prison by the City of St. John and later by th 
Government of New Brunswick; at the Union of the Provinces it became the pre 
perty of the Dominion Government, by which it was used as a Penitentiary for ~Ne*\ 
Brunswick, and on the erection and occupation of the Maritime Penitentiary at Doi, 
Chester, N. B., it ceased to be a penitentiary. 

It is situated about two. miles from the City of St. John, on the opposite side c 
■Courtenay Bay. 

The inclosure is 821 feet long (east to west) and 454 feet wide (north to south] 
containing about nine acres. The fence is of wood and in a dilapidated condition. 

The prison proper is 120 feet long by 44 wide, and 32 feet in height to eavej 
with walls of granite and roof of wood covered with slates. It contains ninety cells i 
three tiers of thirty. The cells are placed back to back, 15 on each side on the thrtl 
storeys, and the whole surrounded by a corridor, communication being had by gaj 
leries and staircases. The cells are of granite, and the floors, galleries and gallerj 
stairs of wood. The floors, galleries and staircases are much worn. Attached 1 
this building is a wooden storehouse 44 feet by 28 feet, shingled externally. 

In the rear and at right angles to the granite prison building, to which 
is connected by a two story passage, is the female prison, a brick two storey buildi: 
108 feet by 43 feet with a slated roof, and containing two tiers of brick cells, twenty 
each tier with the Matrons quarters. It is in good condition. 

The workshop is 103 feet by 28 feet, and three storeys and abasement in heigli 
It is of brick with wood floors, and covered with a wooden flat gravelled roof. 

154 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 






The basement was used as an engine room, and the remainder for workshops ; 
with a lean-to boiler house in rear 36 feet by 14 feet. 

The Warden's quarters are in a building having basement, two full storeys, and 
attics, it is 33 feet 6 inches by 37 feet, has brick walls and wooden floors, and wooden 
roof covered with slates. The building is in fair condition. 

Adjoining the Warden's quarters, in a row of 6 tenements, are the guards dwell- 
ings 93 feel four inches long by 32 feet wide, they are of brick, two storeys in height 
with flat gravelled roof, and are in a good state of preservation. 

There is a wooden_barn adjacent to the prison building, 78 feet by 30, which is in 
a serviceable state. 

The porter's lodge at entrance to inclosure is a one story wooden cottage, 23 feet 
by 20 feet 6 inches. 

The dryhouses, latrines, guards outlooks, etc, are wooden buildings, much 
dilapidated. 

\ MILITARY BUILDINGS, LOWER COVE. 

1. Store Building and Offices. — This has a frontage of 103 feet on Sydney street 
by a depth of 38 feet, its external walls are of grey and red sandstone with granite 
quoins to angles and openings. There are two storeys with wooden floors and roof. 
The resident officer in charge of the military stores has his quarters in the southern 
md. 

2. Officers' Quarters. — A freestone building 140 feet by 40 feet. 

3. Soldiers' Barracks. — Two wooden two storey buildings on stone foundations, 
>ne 300 feet by 35, and the other 180 feet by 38 feet. 

4. Hospital. — A main building 35 feet square with an annexe 18 feet by 40 feet. 

5. Recreation Boom. — 70 feet by 30 feet. 

6. Troopers' Stables. — In two parts, one 75 feet by 25 feet, and the other 90 feet 
>y 25 feet. 

7. Officers' Stables. — 30 feet square. 

8. Armourer's Shop and Gate house. — 65 feet by 20 feet. 

9. Commissat iat Offices. — 30 feet by 35 feet. 

10. Gun Sheds. — Two in number, one 120 feet by 30 feet, and the other 110 feet 
>y 25 feet. 

11. Queen's Stores— 100 feet by 40 feet. 

12. Store Building— 100 feet by 20feet. 

13. Guard Boom. — 40 feet square. 

14. Orderly Room. — 30 feet square. 

15. Brick Magazine. — 19 feet by 10 feet, now in a good state of preservation. 

16. Expense Magazine. — A wooden buildirg covered with zinc, 13 feet by 10 feet, 
olerably well preserved. 

17. Side Arms Shed- — A wooden building 21 feet by 10 feet. Dilapidated. 

18. No. 3 Shed. — A wooden structure, 12 feet by 6 feet, and in a good state of 
reservation. 

The above were transferred by the Imperial authorities to the Dominion Govern- 
ment on 20th June, 1872. 

During the great fire of St. John, 20th June, 1877, Nos. 2 to 14, inclusive, 
ogcther with latrines, ablution rooms, lock up, and various other small wooden 
fractures not enumerated above, were burned. 

19. Drill Shed. — This building, which was erected in 1879, is of wood, on a stone 
)undation, with a gambrel roof, the upper slopes of which are covered with gravel 
nd the lower with slate ; it is 200 feet in length by 80 feet in width. On the northern 
:de is the caretaker's quarters, 24 feet square, one storey in height. In the rear 
p a lean-to, containing twelve compartments, 8 feet by 16 feet each, for armouries. 



MILITARY BUILDINGS, FORT HOWE, PORTLAND. 

1. Stone Magazine. — This is of stone, with roof covering of slate ; it is 54 feet by 
7 feet, and 22 feet from ground line to apex of roof, the length being exclusive of 

155 



4G Victoria. Sessional Tapers (No. 10.) A. 1885: 



porches at both ends, each of which projects 3 feet, and the width exclusive of 
butresses, three on each side, 4 feet wide, with a projection of 4 feet 5 inches. 

The building is in a good state of preservation. Adjacent to it is a wooden fill 
ing shed 10 feet by 10 feet 6 inches. The yard is enclosed by a split cedar palisade, 
which is in good order. 

2. Brick Magazine. — A brick building, 60 feet by 23 feet and 12 feet high, with a 
low pitch roof, covered with gravel, and having at one end a wooden porch covered 
with zinc. It stands parallel and adjacent to the last described. State of preservatioi 
good. 

3. Caretaker's Quarters. — A wooden one storey building, 16 feet square, of on 
room, with lean to sheds on two sides and a small porch ; now in a bad state of repair 

MARTELLO TOWER, CARLETON HEIGHTS. 

This is a circular building, 30 feet in height and 50 feet in diameter at base, 
situated on Charlotte street, east of its junction with St. John street. The wall is o: 
granite boulders, laid in mortar, three stages in height, viz., a stone vault resting or 
the wall and on a central stone pier; above is a bomb proof chamber having twi 
gun-ports and one doorway with a vaulted brick ceiling which springs from the wal 
and from a central brick pier; a temporary flat roof rests on the parapet of gun dec" 
and is a protection from the weather. The whole is in an excellent state o| 
preservation. 

PARTRIDGE ISLAND QUARANTINE STATION. 

A new signal station was erected on the Island during X&iZ-TS, which command! 
a view of the Bay of Fundy for many miles and communicates with the station at thj 
Custom House in the city of St. John. 

All the quarantine buildings, fencing and wharf are of wood aud have from timl 
to time received slight and essential repairs. 

Heating by stoves. 

DOECHESTEE. 

PENITENTIARY FOR THE MARITIME PROVINCES. 

It having been decided to close the Provincial Penetentiaries throughout the Mi 
time Provinces, and erect a General Penitentiary in some central locality, Dorches 
in the County of Westmoreland, N. B , was selected, and a site containing 6l9 ac 
of land was purchased within three-fourths of a mile from Dorchester Corner, 
the road to Memrameo )k. 

A contract was entered into on 3rd October, 18^6, for the construction of a c 
wing, the guard's hall, and the administrative block, the latter for the official staff 
the prison ; the building being planned to allow the addition of two cell wings wh 
required, which will radiate from the guards' hall. 

The external walls of building and the cells throughout are of stone and 
partition walls brick, floors of cell wing, boiler house and guards' hail are stone, 
the remainder wood ; the roofs are of wood, covered on slopes with slates and 
vanized iion on decks. 

The basement has kitchen, offices for Deputy Warden, Matron and prison eel 
age, dungeons, baths, fumigating closets, boiler house, &c. 

On the ground floor are the Warden'^, Deputy Warden's, Accountant's, Surgeon 
Chief Keeper's and Storekeeper's offices, guard room, Deputy Warden's quarters, Gua 
hall (now used as a dinning room) and cells. On the first floor are the Deputy Warde: 
and Matron's quarters and two chapels (with Chaplain's room) for Church of Englai 
and Church ot Eome ; on the second floor are the female cells, storage, &c. The 
are 120 cells in four tiers, thirty in each tier, placed back to back with corridors 
ton feet wide on each side and end, directly lighted from the outside walls. The up 

156 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



tiers having galleries projecting from face of cell, which are continued around the 
Guards' hall, and communicate with the chapels, and are reached by staircases. 

The Guards' hall is 40 feet by 60 feet, and 04 feet high exclusive of the lantern 
in roof. 

The administrative block is 116 feet in length, by 102 feet in depth, the cell 
wing and Guards' hall are together 140 feet long, the cell wing being 48 feet in 
width, and the Guards' hall 64 feet. 

The above was completed, and occupied as a prison in 1878-79. The water supplied 
by the well sunk during the progress of the building having been found unsuitable 
.for domestic purposes, an abundant supply was obtained from a spring about 1 J miles 
listant from the prison. 

A large tank and tank-house were constructed at *the source of the spring and 
the water carried to the penitentiary by a 6 inch cast-iron pipe, from which it was 
distributed to the prison, the buildings in yard and the residence of the various 
jfficers. 

A plot of land, 17 acres in extent, immediately surrounding the penitentiary, 
was enclosed by a picket fence or palisade (of logs) 14 feet in height, with guard's 
'ook-out, towers and platforms at angles and at entrance gate. 

The water service, the fence and the present system of drainage have been 
principally executed by convict labour. 

The wooden building used as a farm house before the property was acquired by 
he Government, was repaired and altered for the residence of the Warden. 

In 1880-81 a contract was entered into for the construction of 15 double cottages 
or guards' dwellings, a workshop, a bake-house, a laundry, an hospital, an ice-house 
ind four root-houses, all constructed of wood, with the exception of the cottages and 
: root-houses, these are all on stone foundations. 

Each guard's cottage contains on the ground floor a parlour, a kitchen and a 
: cullery, on the first floor three, and in the attic two, bedrooms. The laundry has a 
Ivash room a drying room and an ironing room on ground floor, with mending rooms 
|)ver. 

The hospital consists of two wards of ten beds each, and kitchen, dispensary, 
burgeon's and nurses' rooms. 

The present accommodotions for prisoners having been found inadequate, a con- 
ract was entered into on 23rd November, 1880, for an additional cell wing, similar 
n construction and materials to the former one, and to contain 200 cells ; also a 
etached boiler house. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

ST. ANDREW'S. 

FORT TIPPERARY. 

This fort with appurtenances was transferred to the Dominion Government, 9th 
larch, 1871. 

The buildings comprise the following, viz. : — 

1. Magazine. 

2. Barracks. 

3. Sergeants' Barracks. 

4. Store. 

5. Kitchen. 

6. Outbuildings, &c. 
In addition to Fort Tipperary, and on the same date, West Point Block Rouse and 

's Point Block House were transferred to the Dominion Government. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

In 1872-73 a contract was entered into for the erection of an hospital, to replace 
ie former one which had been destroyed by fire, and was completed in 1873-74. 

157 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



It is built of wood on a stone foundation and has accommodation for 24 patients, 
and rooms for staff in charge. Heating by stoves. 
Architects, Messrs. Stirling and Dewar. 

DRILL SHED. 

A one and a-half storey building, 40 feet by 30, on Block 2, part of Public Square 
intersected by Water street . 

CHATHAM. 

POST*OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 

This building was acquired in 1872-73 and altered to adapt "it to the use of Postal] 
Customs and Inland Revenue local services. 

It is a two storey and a-half building of stone, roofed with wood covered witl 
slate, and is situated centrally on south side of Water street. 

The Post Office is on the main floor, and the Custom House and Inland Revenue 
on the floor above. 

It is heated by stoves. Plans, etc., for alterations prepared by this Department 

MIDDLE ISLAND QUARANTINE STATION. 

This station, which is situated about two miles below the town of Chatham, oi 
the Miramichi, is 78 acres in extent, and is easy of access from the main shore. Ther<| 
is an hospital 21 ft. by 24 ft., and a Caretaker's dwelling 27 ft. by 33 ft., the latte! 
two storeys in height; both buildings are of wood on stone foundations. 

Buildings warmed by stoves. Plans and specifications prepared by this Depart 
ment. 

MIRAMICHI. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

A 1^-storey building, measuring 40 ft. by 100 ft., situated at Douglastowr 
between and parallel to the Newcastle road and Miramichi River. 

The walls and chimneys are of sandstone and the roof of wood. The groum| 
floor contains two wards, an hospital parlour, a wash-room, a kitchen and a pantry 
in the attic are the caretaker's quarters. 

Heating by stoves. 

NEWCASTLE. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

A stone building, 30 ft. by 30 ft., covered with slate, formerly used as a Custor 
House, was purchased by the Dominion Government in 1872-73, and various sligl 
alterations and repairs effected to make it suitable for Customs Department. 

Warming by stoves. 

SACKYILLE. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This depot consists of an hospital (originally a dwelling house) and seven 
of land, the latter a part of Lot No. 31, Palmer's Plain. It was acquired in 181 
Heating by stoves. 



158 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 



QUEBEC, 

CITADEL. 

The following buildings, together with appurtenances, &c, were delivered over 
by the Imperial authorities to the charge of the Dominion Government on the 
second of December, 1871. 

1. Officers' Quarters. — A stone building, 340 feet by 50 feet, two storeys and 
basement, with wooden floors and roof, the latter covered with tin ; the first floor 
being ceiled with bomb-proof arches; accommodation for 37 officers; in a fair state 
of preservation. 

2. Manns Barracks. — A stone, two storey building, with tin covered roof; size 
125 feet by 40 feet, having on the first flat a reading room and librarian's quarters, 
and on the second flat a school room and quarters for 35 men . 

3. Manns Store and Shot Shed. — A stone two storey building; roof covered with 
tin; size 125 feet by 40 feet. 

4. Armoury and Gun Carriage St ore. —A stone two storey building with tin covered 
roof; size, 180 feet by 40 feot. 

5. Hospital (infection). — A wooden building on a stone foundation, two stories in 
height, with tin covered roof. The lower flat is the steward's quarters, and the upper 
ithe female hospital. Size, 40 feet by 20 feet. 

6. Hospital (bomb proof). — A stone building, two stories in height, with roof 
covering of tin; accommodation for 14 patients, hospital, sergeant's quarters, surgery 
and kitchen. Size, 120 feet by 40 feet. 

Attached is a stone one story dead house with tin roof covering. 

7. Military* Store or Cavalier. — A stone two story building with tin covering to 
roof; size, 230 feet by 40 feet. 

8. Magazine A. — A stone one storey building with roof covering of tin i size, 100 
feet by 60 feet ; capacity, 4,610 barrels. 

9. Magazine B.— Is one story, of stone, with tin covering to roof; 60 feet by 40 
feet; capacity, 2,388 barrels. 

10. Old Provost Prison and Staff Sergeant's Quarters. — A stone building with tin 
covering to roof, 50 feet by 60 feet, having 4 cells and quarters for 3 staff sergeants. 

11; Officers' Stables. — 80 feet by 20 feet, a stone building, one story and hay loft, 
with tin roof covering ; accommodation for 10 horses and harness rooms at ends of 
stables. 

12. Observatory. — A stone two story building, (with a tin roof,) 20 feet square, 
having time ball, &c. 

13. Defensible Guard Houses.. — Four in number ; (1) one at South Ravelin, (2) 
)ne at West Ravelin, (3) one ot North Ravelin and (4) one at King's Bastion. 

14. Artillery Store Shed.. — A wooden building, one storey, with tin roof covering, 
10 feet by 20 feet, 

15. Casemates. — These are situated in Dalhousie and Richmond bastions num- 
bering from 1 to 9 and having a capacity for 702 rank and file, they are of stone, 
)ne storey and bomb-proof. 

16. Engine House. — A stone one storey building with tin roof covering. Size 30 
eet by 1 8 feet. 

17. Stable and Coach House. — A wooden one storey building with accommoda- 
ion for 5 horses. 

18. Armourers Shop.. — A stone one storey building, 15 feet by 20 feet with a tin 
covered roof. 

19. Tenialle.— Between Diamond and Dalhousie Bastions. It is a one storey 
>omb-proof building 170 feet by 20 feet with quarters for 8 staif sergeants. 

20. Casemated Stores.— A stone building 150 feet by 30 feet. 

159 



! 

4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



21. Drill Shed. — A wooden building 80 feet by 22 feet with roof covering of tin. : j 

22. Ablution and Wash House. — A woodea building, 40 feet by 25 feet one storey I 
and basement, and with tin covering roof. 

23. Artillery Stores. — A stone two storey building 20 feet by 15 feet with tin 1 
roof covering. 

24. Ablution House. — A stone 'one storey building, 40 feet by 15 feet, with roof 1 
covering of tin. 

25. Wash House and Sergeants' Mess Kitchen. — A one storey wood and brick ji 
building, 40 feet by 15 feet, with tin roof covering. 

26. Casemates used as a Canteen. —Stone bomb-proof compartments 50 feet by 35 f* 
feet. 

2*7. Jebb's Redoubt. — Built of stone, two storeys, with accommodation for twoB 
officers, one staff sergeant and forty-seven men, and containing a cook-house and out-|l 
buildings. 

28. Artillery Casemates. — One storey, stone, bomb proof, with accommodation forH 
fifteen men. ' 

In addition to the foregoing there are small magazines, one in each ravelin,* 
latrines connected with the various outbuildings, fuel sheds, privies, &c. 

Wells and Tanks. — Numbered one to thirteen with a total capacity of 586.093J 
gallons. 

The condition of the casemates and walls ef the Citadel was found to be sucl 
that in 1872-73 and following years, extensive repairs were made to prevenl 
them from falling into utter ruin, and also to make the casemates fairly nabitable 
one of the most important works was the roofing of the casemates in wood whicl 
protects the walls and vaulting from rain and frost and provides a shed, for drill pur j 
poses, over. 

A portion of the officers barracks, Citadel, was altered and made suitable for aj 
summer residence for His Excellency the Governor-General. 

A balcony or promenade was laid down in King's Bastion,behind the old officer^ 
stables &c, (No. 11 ante) and the latter having been removed a wooden receptioi 
room, 60 feet by 40 feet, was erected, using a part of the old wall as a foundation. 

The reception room is on the first floor, communicating with the drawing-rooi 
of His Excellency's quarters, and the lower story is utilized for cloak room, wate! 
closets and men's bedrooms. 

Stabling for His Excellency's horses has been provided in old storehouses betweeij 
Mann's and Diamond Bastion's. 

The wells and tanks of Citadel have been cleaned and the drains put in workinj 
order. 

ARTILLERY BARRACKS. 

This property, which was given over in charge of the Dominion Government b 
the Commandant E. E. in Canada, 2nd December, 18*71, covers an area of 13 acre 
3 roods and 2 perches. 

1. Officers', Married Soldiers' and Soldiers' Quarters. — A stone building 31 feet 
40 feet, 2 storeys ; basement and attic ; roof covered with tin. 

2. Latrines.— A brick 1J storey building, with tin-covered roof, 40 feet by 
feel. 

3. Offices and Stores. — Stone, 2 storeys and attic, 60 feet by 4t) feet. 

4. Stores and Latnnes. — Wooden buiiding. 

5. Store Shed and Cooperage. — Stone, 1 story, roof covering tin, 120 by 20 feet. 
H. Work Shop.— 2 storeys, stone, with tin-covered roof; size, 99 feet by 20 fet 

7. Cook-house. — Of stone, 1 storey, with tin-covered roof; size, 36 feet by 20 fe< 

8. Latrines and Lavatories. — One storey, stone and wood, roof covered with til 
50 feet by 15 feet. 

9. Wash-house and Latrines. — Stone and brick, 1 storey, roof covered with tin. 

10. Guard-room, lock-up, cells and Staff Sergeants' quarters. — A stone, 2 -storey arj 
attic building, with tin covering to roof, 80 feet by 30 feet. 

160 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 18S3 



11. Canteen, Officers' Mess, Officers' Quarters and Barrack Boom. — Stone building, 
with tin-covered roof, 3 stories and basement ; size, 76 feet by 40 feet. 

12. Mess kitchen, Sergeants' kitchens and Cooks' quarters, — A stone 1 storey build- 
ing, with tin-covered roof; 76 feet by 40 feet. 

13. Billiard Boom. — Wooden building, one storey, attached to officers' quarters, 
20 feet by 30 feet. 

14. Gunners' Stores. — A stone 1 storey building, roof covered with tin, 20 feet by 
20 feet. 

15. Gun shed—Oi wood, 70 teet by 20, covered by a tin roof. 

16. Coach house and loft — A wooden building 20 feet square, with tin roof 
covering. 

17. Stables and coach house. — Of stone, 40 feet by 20 feet, with tin roof covering. 

18. Armourer's shop. — A wooden building, 15 feet by 20 feet, one storey, with tin 
roof covering. 

19. Fire engine house. — Stone building, 18 feet by 20 feet, one storey in height, 
h sheet iron roof covering. 

20. Artillery stables.— Of wood, one storey, 70 feet by 20 feet, roof covered with 
shingles ; accomodation for 25 horses. 

21. Married officers' quarters. — A stone building, one storey, 40 feet by 18 feet, 
srith latrines attached, roof covered with tin. 

2.S. Kitchen and married officers' quarters. — A wooden one storey building, 18 feet 
square, with tin covered roof. 

23. Stable and Fuel Shed. — A wooden one storey building, 20 fe t by 14 feet, 
•oof covered with tin. 

24. Coal Shed and Latrines. — Wooden buildings, with a stone ashpit attached to 
rmer. 

25. Stone Magazine D. — Situated in Lower Park St. John Bastion. A stone 
storey building, 45 feet by 30 feet, roof .covered with tin. 

Zo. Ordnance Stores. — A stone building having a ground floor and attic, 220 feet 
>y37 feet, roof covered with tin.. 

27. Married Soldiers' Quarters, Glacis. — A stone building, 157 feet 5 inches by 40 
t, having a detached wash house (of wood) 64 feet by 23 feet. 

The buildings above doscribed, excepting Nos. 3, 4, 5, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 
!7, were coverted into a cartridge factory during 1880-81 and 1881-82. 

JESUIT BARRACKS, MARKET SQUARE. 

Transferred to the Dominion Government by the War Department, 2nd Decern- 

These premises, at the time of transfer, comprised a quadrangular barrack build- 
ig, facing on Market Square, a bakery and fuel yard facing on St. Ann street, and 
,ariou8 stone buildings, etc., as follows : - 

1. Barruck Building. A quadrangular building, 200 feet by 190 feet (enclosing 
court yard 135 feet by 115 leet) ; stone walls throughout and with tin roof covering. 

The east wing was two storeys in height and accommodated two officers, four 
jrgeants and 115 men. 

The north wing had four storeys, basement and attic, with accommodation for one 
icer, five non-commissioned officers and 214 men. 

In the south wing were two storeys, basement and attic, affording accommodation 
>r one officer, one sergeant and 133 men. An extension of this wing, which was two 
oreys and attic in height ; accommodated two sergeants and 138 men. 

The west or rear wing was two storeys, a basement and an attic, and provided for 
7e sergeants and 175 men. 

The total barrack accommodation as above was for three officers, seventean non- 
)mmissioned officers and 775 men. 

2. Cook-houses. These ware in rear of above and in a one storey stone building, 
\Q roof of which was covered with tin ; size, 72 feet by 32 feet. 

161 
10 a— 11 



T 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883) 



Attached to this and constructed of the same materials, was the wash-house, 3$S 
feet by 36 feet. 

3. Coach house, Stables and Hayloft. A one storey stone building in rear o 
barrack building; with tin roof covering ; size 40 feet by 16 feet, stalls for four horses! 

4. Commissariat Meat Store. A wooden building on a stone foundation, witq 
wooden roof, and in the rear of the barracks ; size 16 feet by 37 feet. 

5. Straw Store. — A building adjoining and similar to the last described ; s; 
77 feet by 37 feet 

6. — Expense Magazine. — On Market street, with a capacity of eighty barre 
and 65,000 rounds. 

The above, comprised in Nos. 1 to 6, inclusive, were demolished in 1878-79. 

In addition to these are tanks Nos. 1 and 2, the former with a capacity 
127,600 gallons, and the latter a capacity of 5,477 gallons. 

The following buildings are on the St. Anne street front : 

7. Bakery. — A one storey and basement stone building, (with tin covered roo: 
92 feet by 48 feet. 

8. Issuer's Quarters. — Attached and similar to No. 7 in construction 
number of storeys ; size, 27 feet by 17 feet, with a wooden kitchen and fuel shed. 

9. Barrack Offices and Stores. — A stone building, two storeys and basement, wi 
a tin covered roof; size, 90 feet by 35 feet. 

10. Guard Boom, Lockup and Armourer's Shop. — Two one storey stone buildi 
one on each side of gateway, 25 feet by 40 feet, with roof covering of tin. 

11. Engine House. — A one storey stone building, with a tin covered roof, i| 
accommodate two fire engines ; size, 18 feet by 13 feet. 

officers' barracks and garrison hospital, mount carmel. 

These were transferred by the War Department to the charge of the Dominic 
Government, 2nd December, 1871. 

1. Officers' Barracks and Mess Kitchen. — A stone building with two storeys ar 
basement, and roof covered with tin, having accommodation for twelve officers; si 
95 by 45 feet. 

2. Officers' Mess Boom and Beading Boom. — Two storeys, of stone, roof cover| 
with tin ; size 54 feet by 30 feet. 

Purveyors Stores Offices, etc. — Of stone, two storeys, 90 feet by 30 feet, 
covered with tin. 

Attached to Nos. 1, 2 and 3 are latrines, ashpits, etc., etc. 

4. Garrison Hospital. — Three storeys, basement and attic ; a stone building 
tin covering to roof; size 190 feet by 40 feet. The accommodation as follows :• 
In basement, warming apparatus, kitchen and medical stores; on ground floor,surgei 
library, staff sergeants' quarters ; on first and second floor, in each, accommodatij 
for fifty patients, staff sergeants' quarters, lavatories, etc., etc. 

5. Cook house.— A one storey stone building with tin roof covering ; 35 feet by 
feet. 

6. Dead-house. — A stone building 17 feet by 12 feet; one storey in height 
with roof covering of tin. 

7. Guard-house. — Of stone with tin covering to roof; one storey in heigl 
size 16 feet by 22 feet. 

In connection with Nos. 4, 5, and 7 there are latrines, straw stores and shed. 

GUARD HOUSES, MAGAZINES AND FORTIFICATION WALLS. 

These properties were transferred to the charge of the Dominion Governmc 
2nd December, 1871. 

1. Guard House, Carronade Battery. — A stone ons storey building, 30 feet sqi 
with tin covered roof. 

2. Hope Gate, Guard House and Barracks. — A two storey building, with |« 
covered roof; the lower storey (stone) consisted of an ablution room, a cook-hoift 

162 

1 



n 



!46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

=— — 

and a guard room ; the upper storey (wood) accommodated a staff sergeant and 
thirty-3even men. It was demolished in 1874. 

3. Palace Gate Guard House. — A stone building, with basement and ground 
floor ; roof covered with tin. Occupied as a guard, and married soldiers' quarters ; 
demolished in 1874. 

4. St John's Gate Guard House.— & stone one storey building, 25 feet by 15 feet, 
with a tin covered roof. It was demolished in 1881. 

6. Magazine "F," Grand Battery, also Ordnance Storehouse, &c. — Magazine " F " 
is a stone building, 30 feet by 20 feet, covered with tin, having a capacity of 350 
barrels ; storehouse is 60 feet by 25 feet, two stories, with attic and basement. 

7. Grand Magazine " B" {Hotel Dieu). — Built of stone, roof covered with tin ; 
130 feet by 25 feet, with a capacity of 4,832 barrels. 

8. St John's Gate. — This was widened at the expense of City Corporation of 
Quebec; commenced 1863, completed 1867. 

9. Cooperage, Sifting Room and Artillery Store {Hotel Dieu). — Size, 20 by 15 feet. 

10. Magazine, Sifting Room, &c. (Esplanade). — A stone building, with roof covered 
iivith tin ; size 40 feet by 25 feet. 

KENT AND ST. LOUIS GATES. 

During 1878-79 contracts were entered into for the erection of two new gates — 
'- bne, St. Louis, on the site of the old gate of the same name, and the other connecting 
Souvelle and Ursule streets, known as Kent Gate. 

The architecture is castellated, adapted to harmonize as far as practicable with 
,he fortification walls. 

Each gateway consists of two archways, one over the roadway and one of foot- 
)aths, and the other over the remaining footpath. 

The arches are stone, the hanches being filled with concrete, levelled up with 
isphaltum, and covered with wood-block pavement, forming with the ramparts of 
Jihe fortification walls a continuous promenade. 

The front and rear walls have embattled stone parapets corbelled outwards. 
To each gate is a flight of stone steps from street to level of ramparts. 
Each gate has a square stone tower with pyramidical roof over the smaller 
archway, and stone circular corbelled turrets, two on St. Louis Gate and one on Kent 
rate. A contribution by Her Majesty the Queen has been made towards the erec- 
ion of the later, which is named after Edward, Duke of Kent. 

The greater portion of the fortification walls have been put in a fair state of 
lir. 

DUFFERIN TERRACE. 

The Corporation of the City of Quebec having extended Durham Terrace along 
le wall above Champlain street to its termination under King's Bastion, on tempor- 

wooden supports, the Dominion Government repaired the battery wall beneath 
nd carried jt upwards to terrace levol, where it serves as a permanent support. 

Champlain Street Cliff. 

Owing to the shaly nature of the rock exposure of Citadel Hill, on Champlain 
reet, which, through the action of the weather, was loosened, and threatened to 
ndanger the lives of those residing immediately below, it was considered advisable 
3 obtain the properties in danger, and, having demolished the buildings, erect a 
taining wall at foot of cliff. At the same time advantage was taken to widen the 
eet at this point, where it was especially narrow, which prevents loose stones fall- 
g from the cliff, doing injury to property, passers or residents. 

COMMISSARIAT PREMISES, ST. LOUIS STREET. 

These were delivered to Dominion Government by the War Department on 2nd 
)ecember, 1871. 

163 
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4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A, 1883| 



1. Commissariart Offices. — A stone building two storeys and attic, 66 feet by 40 
feet, with a wing in rear 45 feet by 24 feet. 

2. Engine House and Fuel Shed. — A stone one storey building with tin roof cover- 
ing, 65 feet by 25 feet. 

3. Stables. — A stone one storey building with roof covered with tin, size 45 feel 
by 22 feet. 

MILITARY PRISON, ST. LOUIS BASTION. 

The charge of this property was transferred by the Imperial authorities to the 
Dominion Government on the 2nd December, 1871. 

1. Casemates of Bastion. — Contains dormitories for 60 m en, 6 cells, wash roon 
and watch room. 

2. Chief Warder's Quarters.— A. stone building 50 feet by 25 feet, one storey ai 
with tin roof covering. 

3. Warder's Quarters, Office and Store Boom. — A stone one storey building, 
feet by 20 feet, with roof covered with tin. 

4. Warder's Quarters, Cook House, etc. — A two storey and attic stone building, 5| 
feet by 30 feet, with roof covered by tin. 

5. Shot Shed. — A wooden one storey building 100 feet by 18 feet, containing 
shot shed and accommodation for drilling prisoners. There is also a small shed i 
the rear for breaking stone, also privies, and a tank capable of containing 14, 0C 
gallons of water. 

Engineer's Yard, St. Louis Street. 

One of the properties delivered over to the charge of the Dominion Governmei 
by the Imperial authorities on 2nd December, 1871. 

1. Royal Engineer's^ Office. — A stone building, 100 feet by 25 feet, one storey ij 
height and with tin covering to roof. 

2. Office Keeper's Quarters. — A stone building, 30 feet by 40 feet, with woodeji 
roof. 

3. Carpenter's Shop. — Wooden, on a stone foundation, 130 feet by 40 feet, 
covered with sheet iron. 

4. Old Stables.— Of wood, 30 feet by 20 feet. 

5. Smith's Shop. — A stone one storey building, 80 feet by 20 feet ; roof cover*; 
with sheet iron. 

6. Tank. — Capacity, 5, 803 gallons. 

FULMINATE BUILDINGS, COVE FIELD. 

A group of five detached one storey buildings, four of wood and one of brick (o:l 
with tin roof covering,) surrounded by a wooden fence, situated between the Laboi™ 
tory Buildings and Martello Tower No. 1. 

Erected in 1881-82. 

SIFTING SHED. 

A wooden one story building, adjoiniug the Fulminate Buildings ; erected 
1880-81. 

LABORATORY BUILDINGS, COVE FIELD, 

These are 10 in number, 8 of which are wood, one of stone and one of bri« 
seven have roofs covered with tin, one with lead, and two with shingles; these 
detached one storey buildings; a number of these were transferred by the War Dej 
ment in 1871 to the Dominion Government, which erected additional buildings 
made alterations to those existing during 1880-81. 

In connection with these is a wooden one gtorey Koepers* Cottage. 

164 



16 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



CLERK OP WORKS, QUARTERS, COVE FIELD. 

This is a one storey wooden building, adjoining No. ,2 Martello Tower, transferred 
m 1871 with the other War Department properties. 

MARTELLO TOWERS. 

These were transferred, by the War Department to the charge of the Dominion 
Government in 1811, and comprise Nos. 1 and 2 between Grand Allee and Diamond 
.Barbour, and Nos. 3 and 4 on upper and lower sides of St.' John street. 

They are circular, built of stone, three stages in height, the second stage having 
[vaulted ceiling, which springs from the walls and from a central pier; the third 
jtage is the gun deck and is roofed temporarily to protect the masonry from damage 
)y the weather. 

Nos. 1 and 4 are each 9,275 feet cube with a capacity for eight men. Nos. 2 and 
\ are each 10,932 feet six inches cube and has a capacity for 10 men. 

ARMOURY AND GUN SHED. 

This structure has been fully described in the Eeport of the Commissioner of 
JiPublic Works for 1867. 

queen's wharf buildings. 

These are situated on Cul de Sac Street, between the old Custom House and the 
3hamplain Market, and were transferred to the Dominion Government in 1870-71. 
Chey comprise the following, viz. : 

1. Queen's Stores, North and South Wings. — A stone building, three storeys and 
cellar (the south wing having an attic in addition), 250 feet by 42 feet; now under 
he charge of the Marine Department Ageocy. 

2. Military Stores. — A wooden one storey building, 150 feet by 39 feet, with a 
in covered roof, used by the Marine Department Agency as workshops. 

3. Cottage. — One storey, of stone, 23 feet by 29 feet, having a sheet iron covering 
fc'io roof, a wooden kitchen attached and now occupied by the store-keeper of the 

Marine Agency. 

4. Fuel Sheds, Latrines, cfce. 

WATER POLICE STATION. 

This building, which was fully described in the'Eeport of the Commissioners of 
Public Works, 1867, is now occupied by the Marine Department Agency. 

THE OLD CUSTOM HOUSE. 

This building, which was fully described in the Report of the Commissioners of 
. j?ublic Works, 1867, is now in use for the following public purposes : 

The Department of Marine and Fisheries occupies two rooms and the large store 
•oom on the upper storey as offices. 

The Government Immigration Office also occupies two rooms on the upper story. 
Che shipping master's office, two rooms on the ground floor, river police office, four 
•ooms on ground floor and a lock-up in the basement. 

The building is in fair preservation. 

The wooden building on the wharf is partly used as a smithy and store house for 
he Government steam vessels, and a portion is divided off for the shelter of Immi- 






CUSTOM HOUSE. 



This building has been fully described in the report of the Commissioners of 
?ublic Works, 1867, since which date essential and ordinary repairs have been exe- 
Juted. 

The attics have been recently converted into caretakers' quarters. 

165 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188& 



POST OFFICE. 

In 1869-70 a plot of land on the corner of Buade and Dufort Streets, adjoining 
the old Post Office was acquired, with a view of facilitating the entrance and exit of 
the public to and from the building. 

The construction of a new building was contracted for and commenced in 1870-71 
and completed and occupied in 1872-73. 

The building is 95 feet by 68 feet, three storeys and basement. The external 
walls are of grey cut limestone, interior walls of brick and roof of wood covered witb 
tin. 

The portion of the basement, which is excavated, is occupied by the caretaker 
and for heating apparatus. 

On the ground floor is the Post Office proper. 

The first floor contains the Post Office, Inspection Offices and the second floor is 
unfinished. 

Warming is by hot water. Water and gas are supplied from the city services. 

Architect, Mr. P. Gauvreau. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This building was fully described in the Eeport of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, 1867 ; repairs and renewals to keep the building in a good condition have 
been done, and a new system of drains has been laid down. 

OBSERVATORY. 






This building has been fullv described in]J the Report of the Commissioner of 
Public Works, 1867. 

The Director's residence, situated at Bonner's Hill, was erected during 1873-74. 
It is built of wood, 34 feet by 30 feet, on a stone foundation, is 2J storeys in height 
and has separate outbuildings for the accommodation of various instruments. 

Warmed by stoves. Architect, Mr. P. Gauvreau. 



IMMIGRANT SHED. 



This building was fully reported upon in the Eeport of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, 1867, since which date it has received essential repairs only, and is now oc- 
cupied as a smithy by the Marine Department Agency. 



DRILL SHED. 

This building was fully described in the Report of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, 1867. 

LEVIS. 

LEVIS FORTS. 

Transferred by the War Department to the charge of the Dominion Governmen| 
in 1871. 

Fort No. 1. — A stone fort with 11 casemates for 12 men each. 

Forts 2 JSo. and 3. — Brick casemated forts, each with same accommodation aj 
No. 1. 

Engineers' Camp. 



1 



Is situated on the road between the Government Wharf and Fort No. 1, and 
gnrrendered by the War Department to the Dominion Government in 1871 ; th 
buildings are of wood, one storey in height, and compriso the following : 

166 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



1. Officers' Quarters and Kitchen. — Size of officers' quarters, 140 feet by 25 feet, 
and of kitchen in rear, 95 feet by 25 feet. 

2. Soldiers' Barracks. — Four buildings ; size of each, 120 feet by 20 feet. 

3. Canteen. — TO feet by 40 feet. 

4. Offices.— 50 feet by 20 feet. 
5 Workshops. — There are two, size of one 140 feet by 25 feet, and of the other 

45 fret square. 

6. Cook House. — 55 feet by 20 feet. 

I. K C. Officers' Mess.— 50 feet by 20 feet. 

8. Store House. — 50 feet by IT feet. 

9. Theatre.— T5 feet by 33 feet. 

10. Hospitals. — Two buildings, one 50 feet by 20 feet, and the other 28 feet by 20 
feet. 

II. Magazine. — 20 feet by 15 feet. 
12. Guard House and Cells.— 50 feet by 20 feet. 
13/ Stables.— 35 feet by 30 feet. 

14. Dead House. — Fifteen feet by 10 feet. 

15. Butcher.— 25*feet by 20 feet. 

16. Wash House.— 30 feet by 10 feet. 
Also latrines, sheds, etc., etc. 

SPRUCE CLIFF HOUSE. 

This is a stone Villa, two storeys, basement and attic, situated on the road from 
the Levis Ferry to Fort No. 2. 



ni 






TEMISCOUATA BARRACKS OR FORT INGAL. 



This property was transferred by the Imperial Authorities to the Provincial 
Government of Canada in 1856. 

CHICOUTIML. 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is in course of construction on a plot outside and abutting on the 
town line at the rear of the college. 

The basement walls are stone, those of the superstructure brick and the roof of 
wood. The administrative portion, which is central, consists of basement and two 
upper storeys, and the wards which are lateral of a basement and one upper story 
each. Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

GEOSSB ISLE. 

QUARANTINE STATION. 

This depot has been fully described in the Eeport of the Commissioner of Public 
Works lc67. 

A residence for the medical superintendent and an extension to the pier were 
completed during 1871-72. 

A contract was entered into in 1872-73, for the construction of boatmen's dwell- 
ings, two sheds, a Catholic chapel and an immigrant shed, all but the last named have 
been completed and occupied. 

They are of wood on stone foundation, the dwellings being 114 feet long by 26 
feet, the chapel 40 feet by 26 feet with a sacristy 14 feet by 12 feet, and a porch 7 feet 
by 8 feet, and the stables 22 feet by 32 feet and 24 feet by 20 feet respectively. 

The hospitals at the eastern end of the Island were destroyed by fire on the 3rd 
September, 1878. 

167 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



During 1881 a contract was mado for an hospital to contain eighty patients, 
construction was commenced in the same year and finished in the year following. 

It is located at the east end of the Island, is constructed of brick with hollow 
walls and is roofed with wood. 

There are two wards on he ground floor, 60 feet by 25 feet each for twenty 
patients, also surgeon's room, nurses waiting room, kitchen, stores, pantry, living 
room, and convalescents' day room, and on the first floor two wards as on the ground 
floor, three bed rooms for staff, nurses room, day room, and rooms for linen, stores, etc. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

THEEE KIVERS. 

OLD BARRACKS. 

This building, with the military fuel yard, &c, were handed over to the Pro- 
vincial Government of Cauada by the War Department, in 1856. 

A two storey and attic stone building with wooden floors and roof, 90 by 44 feet, 
with two wings, one 24 feet by 15 feet, and the other 18 feet by 15 feet. 

During the present fiscal year and the preceding one, alterations have been 
carried on for the conversion of this building into a Custom House and Inland 
Revenue Offices. 

Architect for alterations, Mr. O. Z. Hamel. 

CUSTOM HOUSE AND INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

It is erected on a portion of the Platon property facing Notre Dame street, and 
covering an area of 1 ,474 square feet. 

The foundations and basement walls are of stone, and the remaining walls of 
brick ; the roof is of wood. 

It consists of a basement, first and attic floors, and contains an examining ware- 
house in basement, and on the first floor a Custom House and Inland Kevenue offices. 

Building heated by stoves. Architect, Mr. H. M. Perrault. 

SOEEL. 

BARRACKS. 

This property was handed over to the Provincial Government of Canada by the; 
War Department, in 1856. It is now under lease to theKichelieu Company, to which j 
the barrack buildings were sold, June, 1874. 

1. Expense Magazine (formerly a windmill). — Acircular stone building three store] 
in height and 30 feet in diameter. 

2. Soldiers' Quarters. — A wooden two storey building, 120 feet by 25 feet. 

3. Prison Cells. — A brick one-story building, 25 feet by 20 feet. 

4. Cook house. — A brick one storey building, 30 feet by 20 feet. 
The following Nos. 5 to 13, are one storey wooden buildings. 

5. Soldiers Barracks— Two buildings, one 110 feet by 25 feet, and the other 
feet by 25 feet. 

6. Offices, etc. — A building 40 feet by 25 feet. 

7. Soldiers 1 Quarters — A building, 100 feet by 30 feet. 

8. Engine House and Commissariat Store. — A building, 50 feet by 20 feet. 

9. Cook-House.—K building, 30 feet by 25 feet, 

10. Guard- Room.— A. building, 30 feet by 20 feet. 

11. Canteen. — A building, 50 feet by 30 feet. 

12. School House. — A building, 20 feet by 15 feet. 

13. Armourers' and Tailors' Shop. — A building, 30 feet by 15 feet. 

168 



:46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



CHAMBLY. 

BARRACKS, FORT, ETC. 

These properties were transferred by the Imperial Government to the Provincial 
jiovernment of Canada, in 1856. 

1. Officers' Quarters. — A wooden building resting on a stone foundation, 192 feet 
>y 54 feet. 

2. Guard House.— Stone, 48 feet by 51 feet. 

3. Infantry Barracks. — Stone, 199 feet by 36 feet. 

4. Commissariat Storis. — Two ranges of buildings, one of stone, 145 feet by 36 
eet, the olher of part wood and part stone, 224 feet by 32 feet. 

5. Commissary's Quarters. — A stone building, 44 feet by 33 feet, with a wing 26 
eet by 15 feet. 

6. Bakery. — A stone building 39 feet by 24 feet, with a wing 13 feet by 25 feet. 
All the above Nos., 1 to 6 were sold on the 14th of June, 1876. 

7. Fort Chambly or Portchartrain. — This is a quadrilateral fortress of rubble 
masonry, with dressed quoins to angles and openings. 

The works were commenced in 1709 and completed two years later, in accord- 
ance with the plans of Chief Engineer Ch:.nssegros de Lery. 

Originally it bad four bastions, measuring from salient point of one to another 
.78 feet, the bastions being 35 feet in height, and the curtain 30 feet in height by 106 
eet in length. The walls are about four feet in thickness, loop-holed for musketry. 

At present there are only three of the outer walls standing, that next the river 
laving been undermined and demolished by the action of the ice; slight repairs are 
!>eing made to the remaining walls , and the debris of the fallen wall piled against 
ihe river bank to prevent further encroachment of the river during the spring 
reshets. 

ST. [JOHN'S. 

POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE. 

This building has been erected on a lot having fifty-two feet six inches frontage 
j»n Richelieu street, and which extend back to Chambij- Canal grounds; construction 
yas commenced in 1877-78, and completed 1879-80. 

The walls are brick, on stone foundations ; the roof is of wood covered with 
lates and deck covering of galvanized iron. 

The basement is used for storage of fuel, heating apparatus, water closets, &c. 

On the ground floor is the Post Office, and on the first floor the Custom House. 

The building is warmed by hot water. 

Water is supplied from the city service. 

Plans, &c, prepared by this Department. Superintending Architects — Messrs. 
lutchison and Steele. 

BARRACKS. 

This group of buildings, which is situated between the Montreal and Champlain 
Railway, and the Eichelieu Eiver, was handed over to the Provincial Government 
if Canada by the Imperial authorities 1856. 

1. Officers' Quarters. — A two storey brick building 180 feet by 50 feet, and on a 
tone foundation. 

2. Barrack Buildings.— Three, each 150 feet by 40 feet, two storeys built of 
>rick, with stone basement. One of these has been since burned. 

3. Magazine. — A stone building 70 feet by 40 feet. 

4. Hospital.— A brick two storey building on a cut stone basement, 60 feet by 
feet with a detached dead-house. 

5. Commissiariat Store. — A brick two storey building, with a stone basement 50 
eet by 30 feet. 

169 



i 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 || 

= 1 

6. Guard-house. — A stone building 60 feet by 40 feet, since burned. 

7. Cook-house. — An octangular building 50 in diameter having brick walls and 
stone basement. 

8. Stables. — A brick structure 40 feet by 20 feet. 

9. Pontoon Shed. — Of wood 90 feet by 40 feet, and now in an utterly dilapidated j 
condition. 

ISLE AUX NOIX. 

PORT LENNOX. 

This property was transferred in charge to the Provincial Government oil 
Canada in 1856. The fortress is a quadrilateral earthwork, having bastions at angles 
and a ravelin on south-west side, and having earthworks, revetments, entrance gate- 
ways and bridges much out of repair. 

The following are the buildings enclosed in the Fort, viz: 

1. Barrack Building. — A two storey, bomb-proof stone structure, 240 feet by 4(f 
feet, having on the ground floor a reading room, a recreation room, eleven rooms foij] 
married quarters, an infants' school and an adults' school, while on the first floor 
quarters for five sergeants and 156 men. 

2. Officers' Quarters. — Of stone, 80 feet by 35 feet, two stories in height. 

3. Orderly Boom and Barrack Sergeants' Quarters. — Similar to officers' quarters. 

4. Magazine. — Built of stone, 100 feet by 40 feet, situated in the north bastion^ 
now in a fair state of repair ; adjacent are a cooperage and a sifting room, of stone 
each 25 feet by 20 feet. 

5. Commissariat Stores and Artillery Stores. — Two stone buildings, each 60 fe&\ 
by 40 feet and two storeys in height. 

The above buildings, Nos. 1 to 6, inclusive, have roofs covered with tin. 

6. Cookhouse and Cellars. — Casemates 170 feet by 30 feet, situated at the nortl 
east entrance, and now much out of repair. 

EOBINSON, COMPTON COUNTY. 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building 132 feet by 60 feet, with stone foundations — the latter out of 
repair — situated on Lot 20, Victoria Eoad Eange, which is one acre in extent* 

SHEEBEOOKE. 

DRILL SHED. 

A shed 130 feet by 60 feet, situated on Montreal street, somewhat out of re] 

IMMIGRATION SHED. 

In a wooden one storey building 60 feet by 30 feet on a pile foundation, and 
situated in the immediate vicinity of the Grand Trunk Eailway station. It w£ 
erected and occupied in 1871-72. 

Heating is by stoves. Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

ST. EEGIS. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

This building was described in the report of the Commissioners of Public Worl 
1867. 

Slight and essential repairs have been executed from time to time since 
date. 

170 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

DUNDEE. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

This has been fully described in the report of the Commissioners of Public 
Works, 1867. 

Minor essential repairs have been executed since that date for the preservation 
of the buildings. 

LAPRAIRIE. 

BARRACKS. 

This property, which was transferred from the Imperial to the Canadian Govern- 
ment on 5th November, 1856, consisted of 42 acres, 1 rood and 8 perches, and the. 
following buildings, viz., 

1. Officers' Quarters. — A wooden building on stone foundation, two storeys, 
accommodation for three field and twenty-seven other officers. 

2. Barrack Building. — Accommodation for 150 infantry, 50 cavalry and 64 horses. 

3. Barrack Building.— Accommodation for 11 staff sergeants and 230 men. 

4. Hospital and Regimental Store Attached. — Accommodation for fifty men. 

5. Barracks.— Similar to No. 2. 

6. Guard Room. — For 100 men and 6 horses. 

Also a magazine, an engine house, a guard house, workshops, cook-house,, 
farrier's shop, loose boxes, infirmary for horses, barrack store, forage barn, three cook- 
houses, privies, ashpits, wells, &c. 

With the exception of officers' quarters, magazine, hospital, engine house, and 
guard house, the brildings were sold by the Dominion Government in 1859. 

In 1861 the officers' quarters were burned. 

ST. YINCENT DE PAUL. 

PENITENTIARY. 

The works in connection with this Institution executed previous to Confedera- 
tion, were described at length in the Report of the Commissioner of Public "Works 
for 186Y, under the title of the Reformatory Prison of Lower Canada ; all the works 
spoken of therein as in progress, were carried on to completion with the exception of 
the north pavilion and one of the dormitory wings. 

The prison building completed as above, afforded the following accommoda- 
tion. 

The central block contained the Deputy "Warden's residence, the offices of War- 
den, Deputy "Warden, Secretary, Chief Keeper, the surgery, and on the fourth storey 
the three water tanks with a capacity of 2,000 gallons each. 

In the south wing was the dining hall, school room, kitchen, pantry and drying 
room ; in the north wing, the Protestant Chapel, wash-house, &c. 

The south pavilion had a vegetable cellar in basement, fifteen punishment cells 
on ground floor, and the Catholic Chapel on the first floor. The south dormitory 
contained in the basement ten dungeons, and in the upper storey three tiers of forty 
cells each, making a total of 130 cells in the dormitory. 

The brick building in yard, 39 feet by 25 feet, is used as a tailors' and shoe- 
makers' shop. 

The bakery is in a wooden building 30 feet by 20 feet. 

The stone two storey building, 73 feet 6 inches by 29 feet 6 inches, is used as a 
workshop. 

The Protestant Chaplain's dwelling is an old two storey stone building, 38 feet 
by 32 feet, outside the walls, to the southward. 

m 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The Warden's residence is an old stone building 45 feet by 37 feet 6 inches, 
situated between the Terrebonne Eoad and River des Prairies, one-quarter of a mil© 
from the prison, on a lot of ground 2^- acres in extent. 

The pumpy house is a one storey stone building 37 feet by 25 feet, with roof 
covering of metal, and is located mid-way between the Warden's residence and the 
river. In it is a pump for the water service of the prison building, officers' quarters 
and other buildings connected with the Institution. 

The Engineer's residence is a one and a half story brick building, 36 feet by 35 
feet, formerly the pump house, which was converted first into a Chief Keeper's dwel- 
ling and subsequently into one for the Engineer. 

All the above works were accomplished previous to the 19th May, 1873, on which 1 
date the institution was first opened as a penitentiary. 

A range of guards' dwellings, 163 feet by 30 teet, two storeys in height, with four 1 
kitchen wings, 22 feet by 13 feet, was commenced in May, 1874, and carried.!} 
on under the direction of the Board of Prison Inspection until the close of the same 
year ; in June, 1875, this Department assumed control and the building was com- 
pleted in the foliowing November. It is a wooden structure, veneered with brick, 
resting on a stone foundation. 

A general plan for the extension of the prison was approved of in 1877. This 
comprised a guards hall 67 feet square, at the further end of the cell wing, from 
which three new wings (each 126 feet by 47 feet) radiate, forming, with the original 
cell wing, a plan in the form of a Greek cross, of these the south wing was completed 
in 1879,and the north wing is now nearly finished. These, with the original cell wing 
give 444 cells. 

The cells in the new wing are 8 feet by 4 feet, and 8 feet in height, and havt 
external walls of cut stone and internal walls of brick, the floors of the cell corridon 
are of limestone flagging, those of south wing cells being of cement, and of the north 
wing oak. The roofs of the new wings are wood, covered with metal. 

In 1876 the north pavilion was finished, and occupied as a Roman Catholic 
Chapel, and the south pavilion arranged as an extension of the south cell wing,giving 
an additional sixty cells. 

In 1879 an addition of 83 feet by 40 feet was made to the Roman Catholic 
Chapel, new seating executed in ash, the ceiling elaborately ornamented in plaster 
and the chancel windows filled with stained glass. This building has accommodation 
for 500 convicts. 

There is in course of erection a stone three storey dining hall 127 feet by 68 feet 
arranged to admit of future extension; the walls are to be lined with brick, the floors 
constructed with iron joists and brick arches covered with oak flooring. 

The basement will contain a kitchen, scullery, stores, wash house, and baths, the! 
dining hall is to occupy the principal floor, and a drying room the uppermost storey;: 
in locating the dining hall it was found that the boundary wall required extension 
and an additional 100 feet on the north side was enclosed by a temporary woodenf 
fence. 

The barn and root cellar is a stone building 81 feet by 41 feet, about J mile from! 
the prison (erected in 1877), and has a root cellar in the basement, the walls oij 
which are lined with brick and the floor of cement. 

The farm buildings and stables ; were destroyed by fire in September 1877, and 
temporary wooden stables with briak lining 49 feel, by 28 feet, to accommodato 14j 
horsesj also a carriage house, 41 feet by 36 feet, were completed in November follow} 
ing, at the same time a wooden piggery with a capacity for 80 hogs, was constructed, 
50 yards outside the boundary wall. 

The stone cutters' shed being too small and inconveniently located, a wooden 
-building 125 feet by 40 feet, with a capacity for 80 workmen, was erected in 1878.^ j 

The smithy being too small and unsuitable, a wooden building, with inside 
lining of brick, and with a capacity for four fires, was erected in 1877. 

An oven being required, an addition of 30 feet by 12 feet was made to the bake- 
house during 1881-82. 

172 



I 



: 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



A building for the storage of powder, etc., has been recently erected at the 
quarry, and is of stone, lined with brick. 

During the past year a wooden building, one and a half storeys in height, 
| thirty feel square, has been erected within the boundary wall for Storekeeper's and 
Clerk of Works' offices, and for storage of hardware. 

A wooden stable and carriage house, 30 feet by 18 feet, has been built at a dis- 
tance of fifty yards outside the boundary for the Deputy Warden, and at the same 
'distance is an implement-shed of wood, 76 feet by 3 i feet. 

The brick yard is one quarter of a mile northward of the prison, and the bricks 
,used in construction of the prison works are made by the convicts. An addition to 
the brick shed, 60 feet by 40 feet, was erected in 1878. 

The main drain, which is in progresses to run northward a distance of 750 
yards into a creek which empties into the Ottawa Eiver. Commencing at the prison, 
(for 140 yards lineal, the excavation is in solid rock and the remainder through clay. 

Water is supplied to the prison buildings, guards' dwellings, stables, etc., from the 
tanks in main building. Hydrants are placed in front of prison for fire protection ; 
iwood sheds and outbuildings in the rear. 

As no building stone was to be had on the penitentiary property, a farm of 65 
acres, with a good quarry thereon, was purchased, and all the stone used for building 
purposes at the prison has been obtained thereat. 

The lime kiln is situated fifty yards northward of the prison, and has a capacity 
; of 1,000 bushels. 

A tramway with a 3 feet 6 inch guage, If miles long, to connect quarry with 
prison yard, was built in 1878. 

MONTREAL. 

POST OFFICE. 

The building is situated on the corner of St. James and St. Francois Xavier 
streets, extending back to Fort fication lane and adjoining the Bank of Montreal. It 
covers the entire lot, occupying an area of 11,804 square feet. 

The contract for construction was entered into in 1872-3, and the works com- 
pleted in 1876-7. 

The building has a basement, a first, a second and an attic story. The basement 
contains heating furnaces aud fuel rooms, rooms for receiving and despatching mails, 
.water- closets, etc. The ground floor is the Post Office, on the second floor are offices 
ifor Post Office Inspector and district offices of the Militia Department. 

The walls are built of local limestone with brick backing. The ground and first 
floors are constructed of iron joists and brick arches. 

The roof is of wood, covered with slates on slopes and galvanized iron on flats. 

The style of architecture is Italian Renaissance. The front on St. James street 
consists of a main or central feature with two slightly recessed wings; above St. 
James street level it is divided horizontally by moulded cornices into two heights, 
the lower being a continuous facade formed of piers and columns with entrance doors 
and windows between ; the upper portion is divide! into similar bays by Corinthian 
columns and pilasters; the bays are divided horizontally by a string course between 
first and second floors. The main cornice is highly enriched, and above is an attic 
with mansard roof,having on St. James street a central dome in two stages, the upper 
arranged as a clock tower and the whole surmounted by ornamental cresting. 

The two remaining street elevations are similarly treated, but much plainer than 
3t. James street front. 

Heating is by hot water ; gas and water supply connected to city services. 

Architect, Mr. H. M. Perrault. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

The former Custom House (described at length in Report of the Commissioner 
)f Public Works, 1867,) having been found inadequate to the rapid increase of busi- 
ness, a more commodious building became necessary. 

173 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1888 



Tho building known as the Eoyal Insurance block, fronting on corner oj 
Common and Commissioner streets, was offered to the Dominion Government in 
186S-69, and in consequence of its being centrally situated and otherwise suitabld 
and also of the delay which would arise from the erection of a new building it wai; 
purchased in 1869-70. 

Extensive alterations were made to the interior during 1870-71, to render ij 
suitable for a Custom House. 

The building is of local limestone, with floors and roof of wood, the latte:, 
covered with zinc; and it consists of three floors, with basement and attics. 

The basement contains boilers, fuel, etc. On the ground floor are surveyor 
landing waiters, gaugers, tide waiters, etc. On the first floor is the long room, th< 
collector's office, shipping office, clerks, etc. On the second keepers' rooms, watej 
closets, &c, &c. 

There are brick vaults provided for the various branches. 

The building is warmed by steam, and supplied with water and gas from th 
city services. 

EXAMINING WAREHOUSe. 

Is situated on the corner of Common and McGill streets. Works were con 1 
menced during 1874-75 and completed in 1877-78, at which latter date the buildin; 
was occupied. 

It is irregular in outline, and covers an area of 23,800 square feet. It ij 
four storeys in height, covered by a flat roof. 

The ground plan is divided into four by three parallel tramways reaching fronj 
street to street, and from street to lane. The interior of the three lower storeys i 
divided into sections of 18 feet in width by brick walls parallel to the tramway; 
with arched openings at regular intervals for communication and easy arrangement 
of goods. The attic floor is open, and the roof is supported on posts resting on tbi 
division walls of lower storeys. The outer walls are local limestone, the roof is ol 
wood covered with galvanized iron, and the joists and flooring are wood with space 
between joists filled with concrete, which is supported on corrugated galvanized iron 

Steam hoists are in use for elevating and lowering goods. 

Warming by steam, Gas and water from the city services. 

Architects, Messrs. Bourjeau and Leprohon. 

INLAND REVENUE BUILDING. 

This was formerly known as the Custom House, and as such was described in 
Eeport of the Commissioner of Public Works, for 1867. 

It was altered to suit the requirements of the Inland Revenue on its beii 
vacated by the Customs, in 1871-72. 

During 1881-82, the building was extended 26 feet towards the St. Lawrence, tl| 
extension being the width of the existing building. The original front was take 
down and rebuilt ; the remaining outside walls are in harmony with the origin;, 
work. 

Roof of wood, covered with tin. 

Gas and water from the city services. 

It is intended to erect a hot water apparatus for warming. 

GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM BUILDING. 

This building was described in tho Report of the Commissioner of Public Work ' 
1867. 

During 1871-72, the carotaker's rooms being required for museum purposes, 
two storey dwelling for the caretaker was erected in the rear. 

Museum building warmed by steam. 

Gas and water from the city services. 

This building has been recently sold to the Provincial Government of Quebec. 

174 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



MILL STREET IMMIGRATION STATION. 

This building is situated on the line of Mill street and fronting on the St. 
'., jawrence Kiver. It is built with stone foundation, brick walls and gravelled roof. 
Che central portion, which is used for immigrant offices, has two storeys, the upper 
>eiDg dormitories ; and two one-storey wings, which are used as kitchen and baggage 
i ooms. 

Constructed during 1871-7 2- Heating is by stoves. Gas and water from the 
' sity services. 

IMMIGRANT BUILDING. 

This depot is at the Tanneries, or a siding of the main line of the Grand Trunk 
Railway and consists of a dining hall, fifty feet by twenty-five feet; a 
►aggage room, sixty feet by thirty feet ; a wash-house, twenty-four feet by sixteen 
9et ; an office, a cook house and a water closet, all separate wooden one storey 
►uildings. 

Buildings warmed by stoves. 

QUEBEC GATE BARRACKS. 

The group of buildings known as the Quebec Gate Barracks, or Water Street 
Jarracks, was handed over to the Dominion Government on the 28th November, 
870, with the exception of the hospital and commissariat store, which were handed 
ver 1st February, 1871 ; shortly afterward they were all disposed of to the City 
Jorporation of Montreal, and have since been demolished. A description is included 
q the Eeport of the Commissioner of Public Works, 1867. The buildings trans- 
rred were principally of stone, and comprise the following, viz. : — 

1. Soldiers 1 Barracks. 
1. Married Quarters. 

3. Garrison Hospital. 

4. Commissariat Stores. 

5. Provost Sergeant's Quarters and Garrison Library. 

6. Barrack Offices. 

7. Barrack Stores. 

8. Ordnance Store and Cavalry Stables. 

9. Garrison Workshops. 

10. Guard House. 

11. Recreation Rooms. 

12. Officers Guard Room. 

13. Prisoners Rooms. 

14. Magazine. 

15. Cook House. 

16. Cavalry Stables. 

17. Infirmary Stables. 

18. Stables. 

19. Officers Stables. 

20. Wheeler's Shop. 

21. Farrier's Shop. 

22. Smithy. 

23. Gun Sheds. 

24. Wash House. 

25. Bakery. 

26. Brew House. 

27. Boat and Fuel Sheds. 

28. Oil Store, etc. 

Also latrines, fuel sheds, etc. 

175 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188) 



HOCHELAGA BARRACKS, 

These are a portion of the War Department Buildings in Canada surrendered ti 
the Dominion Government in 1870-71, and comprise the following, viz : 

1. Old Cavalry Barracks. — A brick building, two storeys in height, with accom} 
modation for 104 men, and the canteen in part of the lower flat of the building. 

2. Brick Cook House. 
No. 3 to 12, following, are of wood. 

3. Lock-up. 

4. Guard House. 

5. Smithy. 

6. Ablution Boom. 

7. Stables for Ninety-Seven Horses. 

8. Wheeler's Shop. 

9. Sadderly. 

10. Gun Stores. 

11. Gun Sheds. 

12. Harness Boom, etc. 
The prison establishment comprises Nos. 13 to 18 inclusive, attached to whic! 

are latrines, privies, etc. 

13. Chief Warder's Quarters.— A. two storey stone building. 

14. Warder's Quarters. — A one storey stone building. 

15. Lockups.— One, a one storey brick building, contains ten cells, and the o 
with two stories and forty cells* 

16. Prison Offices and Stores. — A three storey brick building, with cells for seven 
prisoners. 

17. Engine House. — A 1 storey wooden building. 

18. Store House. — One storey, built of wood. 
Nos. 19 to 24 inclusive are known as the Hut Barracks, all of which are one store 

buildings, and of wood with the exception of Nos. 23 and 24. 

19. Soldiers' Barracks. — A capacity for forty men. 

20. Clothing Store. 

21. Office and Orderly Boom. 

22. School Boom, Library and Beading Boom. 

23. Tailors' Shop. 

24. Cook House. 
On the 17th December, 1875, Nos. 4, 5, 7 and western half of No. 1 we 

burned. 

MILITARY BUILDINGS, ST. HELEN'S ISLAND. 

These properties were handed over to the Dominion Government by the Ws 
Department, on the 28th November, 1870. 

The island contains 123 acres, 3 roods, and 20 perches. 

1. Barracks.— A stone building 150 feet by 30 feet, two storeys, attic and bastj 
ment, the latter bomb proof, having the roof covered with tin, and providing aj 
commodation for eight officers, eight non-commissioned officers, and seventy-two ran] 
and file. 

Note. — This building was destroyed by fire in 1875. 

2. Barrack, Canteen and Meat Stores. — Of the same construction, materials an 
number of storeys as the last mentioned, 140 feet by 30 feet. 

3. Well House. — A one storey stone building, 12 feet square, with tin coverec; 
roof. 

4. Ablution Boom. — A brick one storey building with sheet iron roof covering 
20 feet by 10 feet. 

5. Expense Magazine.— A bomb proof one storey building 70 feet by 30 feet, witj 
a capacity lor 1,200 barrels, roof covering of tin j adjoining this is a cooperage an 
sifting room. 

17G 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 18S3 



6. Ordnance Stores. — Two wooden buildings, one 430 feet by 30 feet, two storeys, 
basement and attic, the roof covered with iron j the other 410 feet by 20 feet, one 
storey, and with roof covering of feR. 

7. Armouries. — Two in number, built of stone, measuring together 450 feet by 
25 feet, two storeys in height, and with roof covering of tin. It has a capacity on 
ground floor for 40,000 stand of arms, and provision for general stores above. 

8. Combustible Stores. — A stone two storey building, with a tin covered roof, 90 
feet by 25 feet. 

9. Combustible Store. — A stone one storey building, with roof covering of 
asphaltum, 25 feet by 30 feet. 

10. Grand Magazine.— One storey of stone 100 feet by 60 feet, with roof covering 
of tin, capacity 4,704 barrels. 

11. Old Guard Room. — A one storey wooden building, 25 feet square. 

12. Block Houses. — Two in number, each 20 feet square, built of wood. 

13. Straw House. — A stone one storey building covered with iron, 40 feet by 20 
feet. 

14. Cottages. — Two storey stone buildings, 90 feet by 30 feet with wooden roofs. 

15. Cottages and Workshops. — Of wood, two storeys, 140 feet by 25 feet. 

16. Root-house. — A stone building 25 feet by 20 feet, with a wooden roof. 

In addition to those enumerated are latrines, fuel sheds, stables, wash-house, etc., 
principally of wood and dilapidated. 

COUNTY OF AKG-ENTEUIL 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. St. Andrews. — A building 120 feet by 40 feet, with armoury attached, both 
dilapidated, erected on lot 60, concession 4, Township of Argenteuil. 

2. Carillon. — A building 60 feet by o0 feet, with a small armoury in very poor 
state of repair, situated on Centre street. 

3. Cushing. — Shed of wood, 100 feet by 40 feet, with a small armoury adjacent, 
ooth in good condition, located on the Carillon Koad. 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 



OTTAWA. 

i HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT. 

Works executed previous to Confederation were fully reported upon in the 
Report of the Commissioner of Public Works, 1867. 

It was directed by an Order in Council, dated 29th February, 1868, that the con- 
struction of the Parliament Library should not be proceeded with. During the same 
'ear the furniture of Houses of Parliament and Government Departments generally 
fas renewed. 

Gas supply of House of Parliament and Departmental, Buildings furnished by 
lie Ottawa Gas Company. 

In November, 18/0, a contract was signed for the completion of the walls of 
, jibrary building, and the materials for root arrived from England. 

In the following year a new Speaker's throne and reporters' gallery were erected, 
ud the contract for completing central tower was entered into. 

During 1873 the timber framing, etc., for Library roof was commenced by days' 
/ork, considering that it conld thus be more expeditiously performed. Tenders were 
jivited for slating, glazing, etc , for Library roof and for covering main tower. 

(The system of ventilation was re-arranged in 1ST 4. 
177 
10 a— 12 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The condition of steam heating boilers was such as to necessitate their removal 
and replacement by four new tubular boilers one of which was intended for the new 
Library building. Alterations of the Speaker's rooms and reporters gallery were 
made and the masonry of Library building completed during the same year. 

In the following year (1875) divisional walls in attic were built, and iron doors 
placed therein for protection against fire. Mains for fire service were laid in the 
basements, connected with hydrants placed at various points around the building, ex- 
ternally, for attachment of hose. 

In 1877 the new Library building was completed and occupied. 
It is floored with Canadian woods viz ; oak, ash, cherry and walnut. Book-cases| 
and fittings of pine, bookcases in three stories with eight divisions, the spaces \)Q-\ 
tween forming small alcoves enclosed with iron railing. 

The upper stories of bookcases have projecting galleries floored with glass, ancU 
iron railing. 

These galleries are reached by stone staircases. The offices of the Librarian] 
Secretary, etc., adjoin the Library proper. 

The rooms immediately south of main library, first occupied for offices con-' 
nected therewith, in 1877 were arranged for the accommodation of the Supreme 
Court, but on the conversion of the workshops into a Supreme Court building theu 
temporary quarters were converted into a Commons reading room and retiring room. 
for the members of the Cabinet and House of Commons. 

Upper stages of main Tower have been arranged to receive new clock which 
was put in place and in running order in 1879. 

During 1879-80 accommodation being inadequate, the reporters gallery was alteij 
ed and extended. 

An accidental fire took place in October, at the House of Commons, causi 
damage to ceiling, roof, furniture and walls of chamber. These damages were repair' 
ed and the chamber cleaned and decorated. 

EASTERN AND WESTERN BLOCK DEPARTMENTAL BUILDINGS. 

Works executed previous to Confederation are treated of in the report of th 
Commissioner of Public Works, 1867. 

During the fiscal year 1870-71 the attics over the Department of Agriculture 
were divided and finished as offices for the Census staff. 

In the two years following the remaining portions of the Western Block atti 
were converted into rooms for the patent models and for additional office room fo 
Department of Public Works, and a portion of the Eastern Block attic wasconve 
into offices for Department of the Interior. 

In 1873-74 two new tubular boilers were placed in boiler house of Eastern Block 
also two in the Western Block, as those previously in use were considered inadequai 
and their removal advisable owing to their condition. An iron staircase from fir 
floor to attic was erected adjoining the Council Chamber. 

During the same year the attics of Eastern and Western Blocks were divid 
into sections, by walls of brick, with iron doors to lessen risks in case of fire. 

Further accomodation being required, plans and specifications were prepai 
tenders were invited and a contract entered into during 1874-75 for the basement 
an extension of the Western Block, which was completed in 1875-76 and contrac 
entered into for the superstructure. This building was carried on continuously un 
completion in January, 1877, when it was partially occupied as offices. It covers 

i of 17,900 square feet, furnishing fifty-eight additional offices on the three upp 
floors, besides ten rooms in the basement. Central corridors on each floor, ten fe 
wide, running the entire length of the building. Entrances are provided on grout 
and basement floors. The main staircase is in rear of the principal tower. Extern 
walls are of stone, similar to original building, lined with brick, and with a cavil 
between outer and inner wall; internal or division walls of brick. Floors are co 

178 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



structed with iron joists and brick arches levelled up with cement and covered with 
wood. The floor levels of original building are maintained in the extension. 

The principal tower, which is 274 feet in height from ground to top of fi nial, 
is situated about the centre of the western front and contains the principal entrance 
and vestibule. 

The main roof framing is of iron, excepting necessary woodwork for securing 
roof boards; the decks are covered with galvanised iron and the sloping portions 
with slate. Heating is by steam (direct radiation). The gas and water supply ar© 
an extension of the original service. 

Duringthe completion ofthe extension, alterations were made in certain rooms 
of the original building which adjoined, and preparations were made to accommodate 
an hydraulic elevator which was fitted up in 1880. 

The vault accommodation of the Finance Department being found inadequate, a 
fire and burglar proof vault was constructed within the Eastern Block during 1880-81. 

Architect for the extension, T. S. Scott. 

GROUNDS, PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

During 1867-68 and 1869-70 the stone and the refuse building material arising 
I from the construction of the Public Buildings were removed; a walk was formed 

I around Barrack Hill, about 40 feet from summit, through the natural brushwood. 

In 1868-69 the Major's Hill and the Nepean Point properties wete transferred to 
this Department by Order in Council, and were fenced and otherwise improved. 

A fence wall has been constructed on lines of Wellington and Bank streets. 
^This fence or boundary wall is of stone, surmounted by cast iron railing and with 
wrought iron gates. 

A plan of laying out the grounds was adopted, and work connected with the 
Carrying out of the design (viz., grading terrace-wall steps, gas standards, summer 
[louse, roads, sodding, drains and footpaths) were executed. 

In 1 878-79 a propagating house for bedding plants required in decorating the 
grounds, was constructed on the north- western corner of the grounds, to which ad- 
dition has since been made. 

GOVERNMENT WORKSHOPS. 

The workshop for the Departmental staff of workmen being of a temporary 

Character, in 1873-74 a permanent building was commenced and was carried on to 

i jompletion and occupation in the autumn of 1875. It was of two storeys,of stone, with 

II wooden roof covered with slates and galvanized iron. 

Coal sheds, lumber sheds, and drying house were erected adjoining, and a wall, 
yith gates enclosed the workshop yard from the Public Grounds. The building was 
tted up with wood working machinery, and was used for its original purpose until 
une, 1880, when it was decided to close the building as a workshop. The machinery 
'/as disposed of by auction, and in 1880-81 a contract w^as entered into to convert this 
iuildmg into a Supreme Court, and a portion of the drying house in yard into # 

laboratory and photometric gallery for Department of Marine and Fisheries. 

I Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

NEW SUPREME COURT AND ART GALLERY. 

The building was originally constructed for Government Workshops and was 
inverted to its present uses and occupied during the year 1881-82. 

The external appearance was rendered more ornate by the addition of gabled 
\ Undows required for lighting the Court room. 

The ground floor contains Picture Gallery, public entrance, Barristers' rooms, 
Sees, vault, water closets, etc. 

The first floor contains Court room, Judges' Library, consulting and waiting 
Horns, and Picture Gallery. 

179 
10a—12J 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Heating is by steam. Gas and water supplied from the city services. 
Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

GOVERNMENT HOUSE. 

On the 7th of August, 1865, the land forming the estate attached to this resi- 
dence was leased by the Government from Thomas and Ann McKay, at an annual! 
rent of $4,000, for a period of twelve years, with power to purchase said lot at any! 
time within three years from the date of the lease, at the price of $70,000, or at anyl 
time during the remaining nine years, to be determined by arbitration. 

An additional lot on the river front, and known in tne locality as " the Bay,"' 
was leased on the 1st September, 1867, from the same parties, at an annual rent of 
$720, with the right to the Government to purchase at a price to be ascertained, hi 
case of dispute, by arbitration. 

In the spring of 1868 the Government decided on purchasing the whole pro 
perty, comprising the following lots, viz. : 

Acres. Roods. Perches 

The "KMeau Hall Domaine " 77 1 

"The Bay" 9 1 25 

■"The Triangle " t 19^ 

Making in all 87 3 44 r ^ 

•at the total price of $82,000, and on the 28th of July, 1868, the deed of sale wj 
executed. 

There was on the estate a stone dwelling, which was enlarged and convert 
into a commodious mansion. The grounds were fenced and laid out with ornament 
walks and gravelled roads, and planted with young trees and shrubs. A conserv 
tory, vinery, fiower garden, kitchen garden, cottage residence, stabling, coach hous 
guard hoube, lodge, and iron gates were also added, the greater portion of whk| 
were completed and the mansion furnished during the fiscal year, ended June, 186| 

During the same year a cottage lor the secretary, a new gate house, 
porters' lodge, and a gateway with stone pillars and iron gates at the principal ei 
trance to the grounds were erected ; also, a cottage for the gardener, fencing of riv 
front and kitchen garden, sinking wells for garden, and stable water supply, erecti 
outbuildings, &c. The secretary's cottage and the gate house are of brick, the lat 
with stone dressings, while the gardener's cottage is of wood, rough cast, all roo: 
in wood and on stone foundations. 

In the following year an addition was made to end of main corridor for a cons 
vatory and a portion of the original conservatory converted into a forcing house. Til 
back road to Governor's stables was changed in direction, elevated, levelled, macaJi 
raized and fenced. The water supply at this time was from wells for hard water, whir 
for laundry purposes river water had to be procured. 

t The Military secretary's house, one storey brick house, had an additional stonM 
added during 187--73, and in this and the following year a reception room anc* 
greenhouse were added to the main building, and the entire roof of the house re-Cf*< 
ered. In the lattei year the City of Ottawa water main was extended to GovernmM} 
House, and has supplied water for all purposes continually since then. 

In 1876-77 additional rooms were added to kitchen wing and Private Secretaiji| 
apartments. 

During 1877-78 a gasometer house, containing a gasometer with a capacityp| 
25,000 cubic feet was erected. Excavation had to be made in rock for tank which™ 
lined with brick in cement ; foundations of gasometer house are of stone, imt 
brick superstructure and roof of wood ; adjoining it is an engine and boiler house^r 
exhausting apparatus to fill gasometer when city pressure is insufficient. 

In 1878-79 a new laundry was erected, 26 feet by 44 feet, of brick on a safe 
foundation, with wooden roof, and containing on ground floor a wash-house, &$J' 

. « I 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



closet, aDd a laundry ; on first floor a kitchen, a living room, and three other 
rooms. It is supplied with water and gas. 

In 1819 80 the system of drainage was completely re-arranged ; a temporary 
cloak room was built, and additions made to skating rink, including a log cabin. 

Heating of Government House is by hot air furnaces. All works carried out 
under the immediate superintendance of this Department. 

POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE. 

The site was selected during the fiscal year 1871-72, being a portion of the Ord- 
nance property situated between the west ends of Sappers' and Dufferin Bridges; it 
is central and in close contiguity to the Public Buildings. 

In order to obtain a lane in rear, a strip of land was purchased from tbe Egan 
©state adjoining, containing 4,656 superficial feet. 

The work of construction were commenced in 1872-73 and the building completed 
and occupied in 1875-76. 

It covers an area of 10,440 square feet. The style of architecture is Italian in 
character. The external walls are ofBerea sandstone and are lined with brick. 

Floors, partitions and roof of wood ; roof covered with slates and galvanized 
iron. 

The basement and sub-basement are occupied as store-rooms, examining ware- 
house and boiler and fuel rooms. 

The ground floor contains the Post Office only; the Custom House and Inland 
Eevenue and the District Post Office Inspection occupying the first floor. 

The seeond floor accomodates the Ottawa Eivor Works office, Accountant of 
Penitentiaries and laboratory for the local Collector of Inland Eevenue. 

Brick safes are provided for the various departments on the several floors. 

The building has a steam heating apparatus. 

Gas and water are supplied from the city services. 

Superintending Architect, Mr. Walter Chesterton. 

GEOLOGICAL MUSEUM. 

The building, formerly known as the Clarendon Hotel, on the north east corner 
jaf Sussex and George street, was acquired for the purpose of a Geological Museum, 
and was altered, and occupied as such during the fiscal year 18H0-81. " 

The museum has a frontage on Sussex Street of 63 feet, and on George Street of 
1156 feet. 

The basement is^'divided into rooms for storing and unpacking specimens, as also 
| rooms for lavatories and heating apparatus. 

The public entrance to the ground floor is in Sussex Street. 

The ground floor contains drawing office, chemist's laboratory and office, safe, 
•eception room and offices of Director and Accountant.. 

The first and second floors are occupied by museum rooms and offices. 

A large part of the fittings of the former museum (Montreal) were re-used here. 
Building warmed by a hot water apparatus. Gas and water from city services. 

Plans, e^c, prepared by this Department and work carried out under its imme- 
diate supervision. 

GUN SHED. 

I This building which was described in the Eeport of the Commissioner of Public 
liVorks, 1867, is now used as a store house by the Department of Marine and Defence. 

COUNTY OF CAELETON. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

Ottawa. — In 1878-79 a site was chosen for this building on the eastern side of 
partier Square, and the building was contracted for in the same year and completed 
,n the year following. 

181 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The building is of brick, on a stone foundation, and roofed with wood. 

It consists of a large, central hall, 75 feet wide by 178 feet long, fifty feet from 
floor to apex of roof. Surrounding the hall on three sides, and communicating with 
same, are rooms for Field Battery, Cavalry, Garrison Artillery and Foot Guards, 
orderly rooms, quarter-masters' rooms, stores and museum ; over a portion of these 
are band rooms, reception rooms and stores. 

Heating is by stoves ; gas and water from the city services. 

Plans, &c ..prepared by this Department, and works carried out under its 
supervision. 

2. Kinburn. — A wooden shed, 80 feet by 40 feet, two storeys in height, with the 
upper storey for armoury, etc., 80 feet by 24 feet, the armoury being 78 feet by 12 
feet. It is situated on a part of Lot 12, Concession 6, in Township of Fitzroy, and is ! 
in good condition. 

COUNTY OF LANARK, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Carleton Place. — A wooden shed, 80 feet by 48 feet, with armory in roof, 20 
feet by 12 feet. Erected in 1867. 

2. Perth. — A wooden building, 150 feet \>y 80 feet, with armories and caretaker's I 
quarters attached, situated on lot 8, south side of Heriot street, and in need of repair? I 
built in 1868. 

COUNTY OF RQSSELL, ONT. 



DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Vernon. — A wooden building, 80 feet by 48 feet, with a lean-to armory 12 feet 
by 12 feet, situated on 6th con. road, Township of Osgoode. It was built in 1869, 
and requires repairs. 

2. Metcalfe. — The same size shed as Vernon, but armory 18 feet by 13 feet, 
situated on Byron street, and in excellent condition ; built in 1871. 

CORNWALL DRILL SHED. 

DRILL SHED. 

Shed 80 feet by 54 feet, of wood, with a lean-to armory and band room (the latter 
dilapidated), situated on south-west corner of lot 16, south side of Fourth street; 
erected in 1868. 

PRESCOTT. 

PORT WELLINGTON* 

This is a quadrilateral earth work 850 feet by 300 feet (with a salient angle in 
the centre of the north face; ei >urt yard containing a block houee, etc., 

and surrounded by a cedar pali-ade protected by a ditch on the eastern, western and 
southern faces. 

There is a stone caponier in the centre of the southern ditch and two open tra- 
verses at the northern ends of the eastern and western ditches. The gateway is on 
the north o eastward of the salient. 

The cou " y ird contains a two storey >ck house 50 feet square, and the 

following wooden buildings, viz.. : A guard house, a cook house, an armoury and j 
latrines. All ihe buil e in a fair state of repair. 

182 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers ( ' ' >. 10.) A. 1883 

^= r ' ^ =_j =: ' = 

COUNTY OF GRENYILLE, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. BvrritVs Rapids. — A wooden building 84 feet by 48 feet, with an armoury 24 
feet by 15 feet attached, situated on the Bank of the Rideau Canal and was erected in 
1869. 

2. Merrickville. — Same size as that at Burritt's Rapids, and situated near the 
Kideau Canal. It was erected in 1868. 

BROCKYILLE. 

grant's island block-house. 

This was transferred to the Provincial Government of Canada by the Imperial 
authorities in 1856. 

COUNTY OF LEEDS, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Gananoque. — A wooden shed 120 feet by 60 feet, with a lean to armoury 24 
feet by 16 feet, harness rooms, etc., 50 feet by 24 feet, constructed between the trusses 
of the roof. 

Erected on lots Nos. 3 and 4, sub-division of block O, in 1868, and now in good 
condition. 

2. Lansdowne. — An 80 feet by 48 feet shed with a lean-to armoury 24 feet by 16 
feet, situated near the corner of Centre street and concession road, and is in a poor 
state of repair. Built, 1868. 

KINGSTON. 

NAVAL RESERVE, AND ROYAL MILITARY COLLEGE. 

The naval reserve, Kingston, with the buildings thereon, were delivered over to 
the Dominion Government by the officer commanding R. E. in Canada, on the 24th 
January, 1871. 

At that date the following buildings, Nos. 1 to 31 inclusive, were in existence : 

1. Cottage. — One storey, of wood, (since demolished). 

2. Old Stable. — A one storey log building (since demolished). 

3. Carpenter's Shop. — One storey, wood (since demolished). 

4. Cottage and Shed. — Similar to No. 3 (since demolished). 

5. School — Similar to No. 3. (since demolished). 

6. Commodore's House. — A two storey wooden building (since demolished). 

7. Ice House. — Stone basement only; now in a bad state of repair. 

8. Cottage. — Wood, one storey (since demolished). 

9. Steam Furnace.— Stone, one storey (since demolished). 

10. Old Cottage. — Wocd, one storey (since demolished). 

11. Military Store llaster's Quarters. — Two sioreys and basement with wooden 
oof, converted into officers' quarters by the Dominion Government. 

12. Well House—One storey, stone, and in good repair. 

13. Log Stable. — One storey (since demolished.) 

14. Old Cottage, etc. — One storey, stone, now a wood shed and closets. 

15. Naval Cottages. — Numbered 1 to 9, of stone, with wooden roofs, and are now 
sed as servants' quarters; adjoining there are two wooden buildings, a fuel shed and 
carpenter's shop. 

The following (Nos.. 16 and 31 inclusive) were situated in the dock yard. 

16. Guard House. — Stone, one storey, with wooden roof, now in good state of 

Impair; attached to which is a one and a half storey stable, erected by the Dominion 
overnment. 

183 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883. 



17. Porter's Lodge. — Similar to No. 16 in all respects. 

18. Kitchen. — One storey, of wood, with roof covering of tin (since demolished). 

19. Store Rouse, etc. — Wood, one storey and loft (since demolished). 

20. Bouching 'Sheds. — Similar to No. 18 (since demolished). 

21. Foreman's Quarters.— Wood, one storey and attic (since demolished). 

22. Carpenter's Shop and Engine Mouse. — Wood, one storey and loft (since de- 
molished). 

23. Coal Store. — Stone, one storey and loft (since demolished). 

24. Smithy. — Stone, one storey, with tin covered roof, and has been converted' 
into a gymnasium by the Dominion Government. 

25. Boat-house and Store. — Wood, two storeys (sinceMemolished). 

26. Coal-house and Guard-house. — Wood, one storey (since demolished). 

27. Main Store-house or Frigate. — Stone building, 3 storeys, with basement and 
tin covered roof. Altered in 1874-75 for the purposes of a military school, andll ; 
occupied as such in 1876. 

Faint-house, Stores, etc. — Wood, one storey (since demolished). 

29. Laboratory. — A two story wooden building, now used as general storeM 
building. 

30. Tar-house. — Wood, one storey (since demolished). 

31. Old Magazine. — Stone, with wooden roof. 
In the vicinity of No. 11 (ante) a brick one and a half story building with aji 

wooden roof has been erected for officer's stables, and a similar building erected) f, 
adjacent to the Commandant's quarters. 

In 1876-77 a contract was entered into for a new College building, which wasf: 
completed and. occupied in 1875. It covers an area of 1,080 superficial yards, with alii j; 
frontage of 185 feet, and a depth of sixty-four feet. The building is plain in design 
the walls being of local stone, the cutting of which was executed by convict labor 
at Kingston Penitentiarjr. It is four storeys in height, with wooden floors and roofs 
the basement devoted to boiler and fuel rooms, cellars, kitchen, scullery, store rooms, 
etc.; the ground floor todining hall, library, day room, visitors' rooms, officers' room 
etc., etc. ; and the first floor to lecture, class and store rooms. 

The building is warmed by steam. 

Architect, Mr. E. Gage. 

During the demolition of part of Market Battery two of the lodges and gala 
houses were removed to the Naval Reserve and re-erected, fronting on the highway 

A brick dwelling, 54 feet by 40 feet, for the Commandant, was erected during 
1876-77 within the reserve, 

A wooden one and a half storey stable and wood shed, and also the following 
one storey wooden buildings, have been erected adjacent to the College : — 

1. Gun Shed. 

2. Boat House. 

3. Boat House. 

4. Engineers' and Coal Shed. 

5. Latrines. 

6. Ice House and Meat Store. 

7. Gate House. 
During this fiscal year a brick pump bouse, 30 feet by 26 feet, with engineer' 

residence over, was constructed. 

Trees have been planted and roads made good throughout the grounds. 



TETE DE PONT. BARRACKS. 



Transferred to the Dominion Government by the Imperial G-overnment on 
14th October, 1870. 

1. Soldiers' Barracks. — A range of two-storey wooden buildings, 190 feet by 
eet, is now used as a drill shed and officers' quarters, and is in need of repairs. 

184 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A, 1883 



2. Officers' Mess and Quarters. — A two storey stone building, 115 feet by 40 feet, 
with tin covering to roof. 

3. Soldiers 1 Barracks. — A brick two story building, with accommodation for two 
sergeants and forty-five rank and file, 50 feet by 40 feet, with wooden roofj now used 
as a canteen. 

4. Soldiers' Barracks. — A wooden two-story and basement building with accom- 
modation for two sergeants and twenty-two rank and file, size 40 feet by 35 feet. 

5. Soldiers' and Married Quarters, Guard Boom, etc.— A range of two-storey stone 
buildings, 200 feet by 40 feet, with tin covered roof, having accommodation for 
9 sergeants and 210 rank and file 

6. Provosts' Cells and Soldiers' Quarters. — A two-storey and basement stone build- 
ing, 120 feet by 40 feet, with tin covering to roof, having accommodation for four 
sergeants and nineteen rank and file, now used as a storehouse. 

7. Cookhouse. — A one-storey stone building, with tin-covered roof, 15 feet square,, 
now used as a coal oil store. 

8. Shot Shed. — A wooden building, since removed. 

9. Cook-house. — A one-storey stone building, with tin-covered roof, 50 feet by 20 
? eet, and now used as an engine house. 

10. Servants' Quarters. — Two one storey stone buildings with wooden roofs, each 
J5 feet by 20 feet. 

11. Commissariat Store. — A wooden building since removed and replaced by 
!j)ne of stone, which is used as quarter-master's store house. 

12. Ablution Boom. — A one storey stone building, 40 feet by 20 feet, with tin 
•oof covering. 

13. Boat house. — A wooden building since removed, and replaced by one in stone 
inside Queen's Wharf. 

14. Wash-house. — A stone one storey building, 20 feet by 15 feet, with a tin 
Covered roof. 

15. Expense Magazine. — A stone building, 18 feet by 12 feet, with tin roof 
[Covering, and having a capacity of 75 barrels. 

16. Old Stables. — Of wood utterly dilapidated. 

17. Fire Engine Souse and Meat Store. — A log building since removed. 

18. Barrack Offices. — A stone two storey building, 30 feet by 20 feet, with roof 
• »f wood ; now used by the Pembroke and Kingston Eailway. 

19. Barrack, Commissioner's^ Store, Stables and Coach-house. — A log building 
\ ince removed. 

20. Barn and Forage Store. — A one storey stone building, roof covered with tin. 
!1 his with No. 21 are leased as a lumber yard. 

21. Granary. — A wooden building. 

In addition to the .foregoing there are latrines, fuel shed, etc., attached to the 
arious buildings. 

22. Gun Shed. — A one storey wooden building erected by the Dominion Gov- 
rnment. 

FORT FREDERICK. 

This property was transferred by the War Department to the Dominion Gov- 
rnment on the 5th September, 1870. It consisted, in addition to the ramparts and 
T alls, of the following, viz : 

1. Tower Fort and Magazine. 

2. Stone Defencible Guard House. 

3. Stores, Cook-house and Wash-house. — Four wooden one storey buildings, one 
■ if which has since been removed. 

4. Latrines, etc, 

ARTILLERY PARK BARRACKS. 

This property was transferred to the Dominion Government of Canada on the 
9th of July, 1870. 

185 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1884 



1. Soldiers' Barracks.. — A two storey stone building, 150 feet by 30 feet, with 
tin covering to rogf, now in a fair state of repair ; attached to these is a cook- 
house and ablution room 30 feet by 20 feet, built of same material as barracks. 

2. Officers' Quarters. — A wooden one storey building, 50 feet by 25 feet, with j 
a kitchen, servants' pantry and latrines attached. 

2. Stables, Fuel-shed and Cow-house. — A dilapidated wooden structure. 

3. Engine house. — A one storey stone building, 25 feet by 10 feet, with roof | 
partially covered with tin and partially with shingles. 

4. Quarter -master's Store, Gun Shed and Battery Store. — A wooden one storey 
building, 100 feet by 25 feet, in good repair. 

5. Wheelers' and Collar Makers' Shop. — A brick one storey building, 50 feet byj 
-20 feet, with wooden roof. 

6. Armourers' Shop. — A brick one storey building, 25 feet by 18 feet, with! 
wooden roof, having a wooden shoeing shop attached, both now in an utter state of; 
dilapidation. 

7. Officers' Stables, Infirmary and Coach House. — A wooden building, one storey! 
and loft, 110 feet by 35 feet, in a fair stato of repair. 

8. Guard House and Cells. — A two storey building, part each of stone and brick,; 
40 feet by 20 feet, and with roof covering of tin. 

9. Commanding Officers' Stables. — Same materials and dimensions as ]$b. 7 ; now) 
in an utterly ruined condition. 

10. Latrines. — These are provided at various points. 

FORT HENRY. 

The buildings and fort were transferred to the charge of the Dominion G©vern-| 
ment on the 10th August, 1870, by the Eoyal Engineers Department. 

All the works included in Nos. 1. to 19. are of stone. 

Nos. 1. to 5. constitute the Advance Battery, each compartment of which is 3( 
feet by 19 feet internal dimensions. 

1. Fifteen Magazines. 

2. Two Shell Booms. 

3. An Artillery Store. 

4. A Commissariat Store. 

5. A Guar a* Boom. 
There is also in the Advance Battery a tank with a capacity of 13, 332 gallons! 

6. Officers' Quarters. — Ten rooms for quarters, an officers' mess, an ante-room an(j 
mess mate's room and a wine cellar, all excepting the last named being 27 feet by 11 
feet each, internal dimensions. 

7. Two Officers' Kitchens. — 16 feet by 8 feet each. 

8. Two Guard Booms. — Each 20 feet by 15 feet inside. 

9. Garrison Cells. — Two of which are 4 feet square, and two 12 feet by 9 feet 

10. Engineers' Store, Orderly Boom and a Commissariat Office and Store. — Each 
feet by 1 2 feet. 

11. Mess Kitchen, Commissariat Stores, a Bakery, a Barrack Store, an Ablutk 
Boom, Two Canteens, an Advance Store and an Engineers' Store. — Each 18 feet by 4j 
feet internal dimensions 

12. Vegetable Store and Begimental Store. — Each 40 feet by 22 feet. 

13. Artillery Store.— 40 feet by 12 feet. 

14. Three Magazines.— -One ol which is 32 feet by 19 feet, one 18 feet by 19 fee^ 
and the third 18 feet by 16 feet. 

Over one side of the fort there are, 

15. Soldiers' Booms. — Numbered from 1. to 18., each being 37 feet by 18 fee] 
internal dimensions. 

16. Staff Sergeants' Booms.-^-Two in number, 23 feet by 18 feet. 
In connection with and adjoining part of the outermost wall are — . 

17. East Branch Tower. 

186 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



18. West Branch Tower. 

19. Reverse Fire. 

20- East Reverse Fire. 

During 18*75-76 the walls and casements were roofed, with a wood block pave- 
ment, tarred and gravelled, to prevent damage by water, etc., and the walls pointed. 

ORDNANCE YARD (FORT HENRY.) \ 

This property was surrendered to the Dominion Government by the War De- 
partment in 18*70-71. 

1. Foreman of Stores' Quarters. — A two storey wooden building, with lean-tos on 
hree sides. 

2. Gun Sheds. — A wooden building on a stone foundation. 

3. Storehouses. — Three in number, two of two and a-half stories and one of one 
id a half. 



4. Guard House (now a Storehouse). — Wood, on a stone foundation. 

5. Officers' Stables. — Wood, on a stone foundation. 
Also various outbuildings, latrines, etc. 



FORT HENRY. 



These were transferred to the charge of the Dominion Government in 1870-71, 
ad consist of the hospital, a three-storey stone building, with tin-covered roof, and 
ve wooden one-storey cottages. 

CUSTOM HOUSE* 

A full description of this building was given in the Eeportof the Commissioner 
Public Works, 1867, since which date it has merely received essential repairs 
id renewals. 

POST OFFICE. 

This building was fully described in the Eeport of the Commissioner of Public 
orks, 1867, since which date essential repairs only have been executed in connec- 
|)n therewith. 

IMMIGRATION STATION. 

This depot is situated at the city end of the Grand Trunk Eailway. The build- 
jk is 60 feet by 37 feet, two storeys in height, built of wood, and resting on a stone 
hodation, the roof being coveted with gravei. 

The ground floor contains offices, dining room, kitchen, etc., and the upper floor 
jdevoted to dormitories. 

Constructed during the fiscal year 1871-72. 

Architect, Mr. John Power. 

DRILL SHED. 

§ wooden building 200 feet by 80 feet, with a wing in rear 30 feet by 20 feet for 
ker's quarters, and lean-to armouries 15 feet by 7 feet, all in want ot repair. 
ijis situated on Union Street and was built in 1864. 

PENITENTIARY. 

This institution is situated on King Street, at a distance of about two miles 
|m Kingston Market House, on the W. \ of Lot 21, Township of Kingston, which 
Mains 117 acres and was purchased in .833. It has a frontage on Lake Ontario, 
Hected by a breakwater, and with a wharf for six large vessels, the minimum 

187 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188& 



depth of water being 16 feet. The area of yard is 10 acres, 3 roods, and 14 perches, 
surrounded by a boundary wall of cut stone, 26 feet in height, with guard towers at 
angles and at West Lodge, and having the main entrance to enclosure on King's I 
Street. 

The main building or penitentiary was commenced in 1833, and is a cut stone 
building, in the form of a cross, with a rotunda at the intersection, 56 feet in diameter,! 
lighted from the roof; the northern wing is 140 feet by 64 feet 6 inches, three) 
storeys in height, with a cellar vaulted in stone, and contains offices of Warden,! 
Deputy Warden, Accountant and Chief Trade Instructor, Chief Keeper's hail, messj 
room, Deputy Warden's residence, Roman Catholic chapel, kitchen and female! 
prison, the last named being on the ground floor, having 62 cells, each of which is! 

8 feet by 2 feet 6 inches, and 6 feet 4 inches in height ; this wing is flanked on the* 
east by a female prisoners' yard, enclosed by a~stone wall, against which the wash-) 
house is built, and on the west by a similar enclosure for the Deputy Warden ; the! 
eastern, western, and southern wings are each three storeys in height, the eastern; 
and western measuring y5 feet by 64 feet 6 inches each, and the southern 85 feet by 
64 feet 6 inches, each wing containing 5 tiers of cells (each 8 feet by 2 feet 5 inches 
by 6 feet 4 inches), with 54 cells in a tior, making a total of 810 cells in the three 
wings. 

The south workshops are situated on the southern side of the yard, twtl 
storeys in height and in the form of a cross, with a square building at intersection! 
54 feet by 48 feet, having a cupola for ventilation, and two stone stairways leadim" 
from the centre upward to a stone gallery, which gives access to the workshops oi 
the first floor. The west wing is 140 feet by 54 feet, having on ground floor th 
foundry, moulding shop, engine room, boiler room, drying kiln, etc., and on the fii 
loor the foundry and finishing shops. The southern wing is TO feet by 60 feet an^ 
contains on the ground floor a foundry, blacksmith shop, brass moulding shoj 
etc., and on the first floor a drying room. The eastern wing is 140 feet by 54 fee 
with the stone cutters' shop on the ground floor, and on the first floor offices an| 
japanning and packing room. The northern wing is 70 feet by 60 feet, and contaii 
store rooms for heavy hardware. 

On the east side of the yard is the building known as " The east workshops] 
208 feet by 46 feet and three storeys in height, on the ground floor of which aij 
carpenters' and tinsmiths' shops, machine shop, engine roem and drying kiln, on tl 
second floor a carpenters' shop and paint shop, and on the third floor a tailors' ar 
shoemakers' shop. Adjoining this is a one storey building 107 feet by 40 feet ut 
as a blacksmiths' shop and wash-house. 

The north lodge is 79 feet by 46 feet, one arid a-half storeys in height, occupit 
as a store room, office, guards' room, and armoury. The west lodge, which is the i 
number of storeys, is- 53 leet by 40' feet, and is the residence of two officers. 

To the sonth of the east workshop is a half-storey stable and coach hous 
furnishing accomodation for sixteen horses and two carriages. 

In the south-east angle of the yard there is a coal house, capable of c^ntainh 
1,200 tons. 

The Warden's residence is situated on a lot of land 4 acres in extent, on 
elevatiou 6 irectiy opposite the entrance to the main prison (which it overlooks) anc 
64 feet by 44 feet, two storeys and basement, of dressed stone, with a vinery and grej 
house attached to it, the former 64 feet by 13 feet 6 inches, and the latter 53 feet 

9 feet 6 inches, while adjoining these buildings is a stable and coach house 53 feet 
24 feet, one and a half storeys in height, and a wood shed with Covered way, 60 f(j 
by 21 feet, the roofs of all these buildings being covered with metal. 

The Farmer's dwelling is about one half a mile north of the penitentiary, built 
stone, 30 feet by 30 feet, one and a-half storey high, roof covered with shingl<j 
adjoining it are three barns, two wooden and one stor.o, (with roofs covered wj 
shingles), the former each 48 feet by 36 feat, and the la; tor U0 feet by 40 feet, havi 
root cellars in basements. 

188 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The ice house, a one storey wooden building at wharf, is 53 feet by 31 feet, with a 
£lter house adjacent to it, 22 feet by 22 feet. 

The coal store is a one storey wooden building, on wharf, 56 feet by 26 feet. 

The sawmill is at the north of wharf and of wood, one storey, 80 feet by 20 feet. 

In 1867 an additional lot, one-third of a mile from the prison, adjoining the peni- 
tentiary property, and containing 17 acres, 1 rood and 39 perches, was purchased 
from the Bank of Upper Canada for quarry purposes. Between the quarry and 
stonecutters' shop at prison, a tramway was erected for conveyance of material. In 
the quarry is a lime-kiln, with a capacity of 1,200 bushels, and adjoining it a wooden 
lime-house 40 feet by 40 feet. 

By Order in Council, 17tb November, 1874, all the above buildings and properties 
were placed under the charge of this Department, by which the following works have 
>been designed and executed. 

The hospital is to the eastward of the prison, two storeys and basement, 124 feet 
■by 60 feet, with cut stone walls and metal roof covering ; the basement contains 
heating apparatus, fuel room and dead house ; the ground floor — guard room, bath, 
room, store room, kitchen, and twenty four cells, each 9 feet by 5 feet, by 14 feet in 
height; and, on the first floor are the surgery, the keeper's room and twelve cells. 

Eastward of the prison is the dining hall, a cut stone building, two storeys and 
basement, with the roof covered with metal, 125 feet by 66 feet; in the basement are 
the bakery and storerooms, on the ground floor the dining hall, and on the first floor 
the Protestant chapel and schools ; adjoining is a kitchen, one storey and basement, 
54 feet by 32 feet, containing in basement the steam cooking apparatus, and the 
ground floor the kitchen. 

The lunatic asylum for convicts is a three storey cut stone building, with roof 
covering of metal, the north half of which is 170 feet by 53 feet. The basement con- 
tains fourteen solitary cells, boilers for heating the building and a fuel room, and the 
ground, first and second floors contain each fourteen cells, making, with the basement, 
a total of 56 cells. On the third floor is the patients' day room, 73 feet by 44 feet 
while on each floor are lavatories, baths and water closets. In the south half of the 
building, which contains the asylum, the ground and first floors are used as grist 
mill. The floors throughout this building are constructed of wrought iron joistiug, 
with brick arches between, covered with sandstone flagging. Construction was com- 
, menced in 1875 and completed in 1880. 

la 1881 an extension of 70 feet by 60 feet was made to the north wing of the ex- 
i tension of south workshops of two storeys and basement with constructive materials 
j same as the original building. A portion of the basement, 54 feel; by 25 feet, is 
vaulted in stone and provides storage for coal, above which, on the ground floor, is 
[storage for heavy hardware, the boiler house, 54 feet by 27 feet, occupying the re- 
jmainder of the basement and the ground floor. In the boiler house are placed six 
(steam boilers and two steam pumps. The floors are constructed of iron joists and 
- brick arches,covered with oak flooring. Cut stone ducts, 6 feet by 3 feet, containing 
j steam mains, lead from the boiler house to the various buildings. 

Outside of tho boundary wall (which forms the rear of the building) is a wooden 
|structure 119 feet by 16 feet for the storage of lumber. 

The farm labourers' quarters are in a two storey and basement stone building 65 



feet by 30 feet with wooden roof, at a distance of one mile from the prison. In the 
vicinity of this building is a stone barn 110 feet by 40 feet with root cellar, etc. 

In the vicinity of the farmer's house are the piggeries,of cut stone, 56 feet by 24 
feet, with a low building 200 feet by 12, for pens, and having a capacity for raising 
100 hogs per annum. 

In 1877 an additional lot of land on the west side,adjoining the old farm, and 106 
acres in extent, was purchased and has been fenced. 

A part of the south east wharf, 254 feet in length, by 5 feet in height, was re- 
built in 1881. 

A breakwater, 200 feet by 30 feet, is in course of construction, to form a basin 
100 feet square, 

189 



! 

40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188JJ 

. , i 

I — _|: 

MXLFORD, (PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY.) 

DRILL SHED. 

Shed of woed, 70 feet by 50 feet, with armoury attached, 48 feet by 8 feet ; both 
in need of repairs. 

It is situated on Lot 25, Spring street, and was erected in 1871. 

BELLEVILLE. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 

A site for the above, with a frontage of 103 feet on Bridge street, and 116 feetl 
on Pinnacle street, was purchased in 1830-81, and during the past year a contract fori 
the building has been entered into, and the work of construction is now in progress]] 

The external walls of the building will be brick, with stone dressings, and thJ 
foundations stone; floors and roofs will be of wood. 

There will be a ground floor for the local Post Office and Weights and Measures! 
offices ; a first floor for the Castom House and Inland Revenue offices, and aiJ] 
unfinished attic. 

Brick safes are to be provided for the several departments. 

The frontages on Bridge and Pinnacle street will be 65 feet and 74 feet respect- \ 
ively, with an entrance for the Post Office on the former, and for the Custom Hous€| 
and Inland Revenue Offices on the latter. 

Architect — Mr. R. C. Windeyer. 

TRENTON. 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden drill shed, 84 feet by 42 feet, situated on Market Square, built in 1869 
and now in a dilapidated condition. 

ODESSA. 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building 132 feet by 48 feet, with orderly room 40 feet by 20 feet, and 
armoury 20 feet by 8 feet; situate on east half Lot 31, Con. 4, Township o 
Earnestown. " 

Built in 1869 and now in a fair state of repair. 

COLDSPRINGS (NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY.) 

DRILL SHED. 

1, Shed 80 feet by 48 feet, with armoury 19 feet by 12 feet attached; situat 
on Lot 16, Con. 5, in the Township of Hamilton. Erected in 1870 and now in g( 
condition. 

COUNTY OF PETERBOROUGH. 

DRILL SHED. 

1. Peterborough. — A shed 144 feet by 80 feet, with orderly rooms, store rooms 
band rooms and caretaker's quarters, situated on north side of Murray street, west 
George, and is in good order. Built in 1867. 

2. Ashburnham. — A shed 80 feet by 46 feet, with armoury 30 feet by 14 feet, bot^ 
in good order; situated west of Lake street and south of Elizabeth street, now in gooc 
condition. Built in 1868. 

190 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



3. Norwood. — Shed 80 feet by 46 feet, with armoury detached, 20 by 18, erected 
on lot 20, Queen street, in the year 1869, now in good condition. 

4. Hastings. — Shed 80 feet by 50 feet, with detached armouries, 16 feet square, 
situated on Elizabeth street, lot 4, concession 7, Township of Asphodel. Erected in 
1869, and now dilapidated. 



COUNTY OF DUKHAM, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Bowmanville. — A wooden shed, 120 feet by 80 feet, with lean-to armoury, 70 
; feet by 15 feet, on east side, situated on Centre street. Erected in 1868 and now 

much in need of repairs. 

2. Springville. — A shed 80 feet by 45 feet, with armoury 18 feet by 10 feet, at 
west end, standing on the north-east corner of lot 23, concession 10, in the Township 
of Springville, and is in fair repair. Built in 1868. 

3. Janetville. — Wooden shed of regulation size, situated at south-west part of lot 
! 26, concession 13 of the Township of Manvers, and was erected in 1869. Now some- 
; what dilapidated. 

4. Port Hope. — Shed 160, feet by 90 feet, with a store, band room and armoury 
90 feet by 18 feet attached. Built in 1868 and now in a fair state of repair. 

5. Kendal. — A wooden building 100 feet by 50 feet, with armoury 16 feet by 12 
feet attached, situated on Lot 9, Clark and Church streets. Erected in 1874, and 

j now in need of repairs, 

6. Manvers. — This is a wooden building 85 feet by 60 feet, in a dilapidated condi- 
tion, situated between lots 11 and 12, concession 9, Township of Manvers. 

COUNTY OF VICTOKIA, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Omemee. — A wooden building 90 feet by 50 feet with armoury and orderly 
irooms 22 feet by 12 feet attached, situated on the south half of lot 6, George street, 
and is in need of repairs. Built in 1868. 

2. Lindsay. — Shed of wood, situated on the corner of Trent and Victoria streets,, 
Built in 1868. 

COUTNY OF ONTAKIO, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Whitby. — A battalion shed, of wood, 145 feet by 82 feet, with armouries, etc., 
T2 feet by 16 feet attached. It is situated on the corner of Byron and Trent streets, 
tnd is in good condition. Built in 1868. 

2. Oshawa. — A wooden shed 100 feet by 65 feet, with armoury 30 feet by 12 feet, 
>n a lot 150 feet by 96 feet, situated on corner of Albert and King streets. Built in 
868, and now in need of repairs. 

3. Brooklyn. — A wooden building 80 feet by 50 feet, situated on Durham street, 
»n lot 24, concession 6. Built in 1868, and in tolerably good condition. 

4. Columbus. — Shed 80 feet by 50 feet, and armoury attached, 20 feet by 12 feet, 
1 ituated on lot 15, east side of Simcoe street, and in fair condition. Built in 1868. 

5. Cannington. — A drill shed 78 feet by 48 feet with an armoury 15 feet by 15 feet, 
tuated on Munro street, sn a lot which contain;-* one-half acre. Built in 1868 and 
ow in fair order. 

6. Greenwood. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 50 feet with armoury at north end, 24 
et by 11 feet, situated on lots ten and eleven, concession six, township of Pickering, 
'•uilt in 1868 and now in bad state of repair. 

7. Beaverton. — A wooden building 80 feet by 48 feet with an armoury attached 
) feet by 11 feet, both in a good state of preservation, situated on Osborne street, 

{ ]ad erected in 1872. 

191 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



•A. 1883 



COUNTY OF SIMCOE, OOT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Barrie. -A. wooden battalion shed, 145 feet by 85 feet, with armoury 15 feet 
by 8 feet, storeroom and caretaker's rooms attached, all in an unsound condition.! 
The building is situated on the east side of Small street and the southwest corner off 
the Town Park. Built in 1868. 

2. Cookstown. — A shed, 85 feet by 65 feet, with an armoury 22 feet by 16 fee 
attached, situated on Lot 1, Concession 1, of the Township of Innisfil, and in go 
condition. Built in 1868. 

3. Orillia. — A stone shed, with a wooden addition for caretaker's quarters 
situated on Andrew street. Erected in 1868, and now in good condition. 

4. Bradford. — A wooden building, 84 feet by 42 feet, with a lean-to armoury, 1 
feet by 12 feet, and is much dilapidated. It was built in 1868 on part of Lot 15 
-Simcoe street. 

5. Collingwood.— Shed, 112 feet by 61 feet, in good condition, with attach 
armoury dilapidated, situated on Lot 36, corner of West and Maria streets. Erec 
1867. 

6. Bondhead. — Shed of wood, 80 feet by 46' feet, with armoury attach 
20 feet by 16 feet, erected in 18oo, and now in good condition. 

TOKONTO. 

OLD FORT. 

The buildings in connection with this work were received over from the Eoyj 
Engineer's Department by the Dominion Government of Canada on the 26t| 
September, 1870. 

1. Married Quarters. — A wooden one storey building, with a stone foundatioi 
80 feet by 34 feet, much dilapidated. 

2. Married Quarters. — A one storey wooden building 70 feet^by 30 feet, badl 
dilapidated . 

3. Two Ranges of Cottages {Married Quarters?) — Three cottages in each, or 
storey, brick, with wooden roof; each range 100 feet by 20 feet, woodwork general! 
out of repair. 

4. Hut Barracks. — A one storey wooden building, 92 feet by 27 feet; general^ 
in a serviceable condition. 

5. Soldiers' Barracks. — A wooden two storey building with a stone basemei 
consisting of a main building 72 feet by 40 feet, with two wings 40 feet by 45 fe 
each ; attached is a wooden one storey ablution room 16 feet by 22 feet ; both buil 
ing in a bad state of preservation. 

6. Large Block Mouse. — A two storey wooden building, on a«tone foundation, 
feet by 40 feet, slightly out of repair. In the rear of this is a barrack store buildii 
of wood, 55 feet by 15 feet, entirely dilapidated. 

7. Block House. — A wooden building 40 feet square, two storeys, resting or 
stone foundation; it is now used as a harness room, and is in a fair condition. 

8. Magazine. — A one storey stone building with tin covered roof, 30 feet by 
I'eet. 

9. Artillery Store. — A two storey brick roughcast building 30 feet by 35 fe 
dilapidated generally. 

10. Canteen. — A wooden one storey building 40 feet by 20 feet; dilapidated. 

11. Cook House.— One storey wooden building 25 feet by 30 feet; in bad statel 
repair. 

12. Armourers' Shop. — A one storey brick building with wooden roof; size, 
feet by 15 feet ; woodwork decayed. 

13. Ablution Room. — A wooden one storey building, 35 feet by 15 feet; in 
condition generally. 

192 



,16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



14. Offices. — A one storey brick building with stone cellar and wooden roof; in 
?ery bad condition generally. 

In addition to those enumerated, there is a number of latrines, urinals and 
>rivies, dilapidated and otherwise not worthy of special mention. 

NEW FORT. 

This property was surrendered to the Dominion Government by Commanding 
)fficer Koyal Engineers in Canada on 15th July, 1870. 

1. Officers' Quarters. — A stone building, with slated roof; two storeys and base- 
aent; 150 feet by 45 feet; woodwork decayed, otherwise in good order; stone 
iitrines in rear. 

2. Barracks. — A one story wooden building, 218 feet by 40 feet, much 
ilapidated. 

3. Barrack Huts. — A stone building with tin covered roof, 120 feet by 35 feet, 
dth accommodation for four officers and sixty -four men. It is in good condition. 

4. Huts for Married Men. — A wooden building, 40 feet by 60 feet, in a dilapidated 
edition. 

5. Block of Three Huts.—- Of wood, one storey in height, 90 feet by 30 feet; well 
reserved. 

6. Latrines Adjoining Above. — 1 storey, wood ; good repair. 

7. Huts for Men. — A one storey wooden building, 80 feet by 40 feet, with accom- 
odation for four non-commissioned officers and fifty-six men ; is in good condition. 

8. Soldiers Quarters. — A stone two storey building, with tin covered roof; size, 
li) feet by 100 feet; general condition good. 

9. Magazine. — One storey stone building, with roof covering of tin ; size, 12 feet 
i [uare ; wood work decayed. 

10. Cook-House. — One storey, wood; size, 20 feet square. 

11. Canteen. — A two storey stone building, with tin roof covering; size, 45 feet 
I \7 50 feet ; in fairly good order. 

12. Officers' Stable and Latrines. — A stone one storey building, with tin covered 
: of with accommodation for five horses. 

13. Officers Stable. — One story stone building, with tin roof covering, slightly 
»it of repair, size 40 feet by 20 feet. 

14. Stabling, etc., for Field Battery.— These are wooden one story buildings, one 
ith seventy-eight stalls, two with sixty stalls each, one with seven stalls and three 

|jr box stables, and a gun shed, also a (brick) harness room, a shoeing shed and 
Iprkshqp, woodwork much decayed. 

15. Royal Artillery Hospital. — Stone building with slate roof, covering two storeys 
||.th a one storey wing, in good state of preservation, size 36 feet by 60 feet. 

16. Ablution House. — One storey brick building with stone foundation and shingle 
liof, size 28 feet by 20 feet, well preserved. 

17. Shoemakers' and Tailors' shop. — A one story frame building, 90 feet by 30 feet, 
j :' good condition . 

15. Provosts Cook-house. — A stone one story building with tin covered roof, size 
I feet by 15 feet, in good condition. 

19. Meat House. — A stone two story building with tin covered roof, size 80 feet 
40 feet, in good condition and with various outbuilding. 

20. Prisoners' drill shed andarmourers shop attached. One story wooden building 
5 by 18 feet, with a stone armourers' shop with tin covered roof, both in good 
lotion. 

21. Forge house and stores. — A wooden one storey building much decayed. 

22. Guard room and harness room. — A wooden one story building, dilapidated. 



MILITARY CEMETERY BUILDING. 



These were transferred to the Dominion Government by the Commandant Koyal 
jgineer's in Canada on the 26th September, 1870, and comprise (1) a magazne of 

193 
10 a-13 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 181 



posts and planks, banked and covered with earth, now in good order. (2) A oi 
story wooden storehouse somewhat decayed. (3) A wooden gun and carriage shec 
dilapidated. (4) wooden office or storekeepers house, one story, roughcast 
outside in good condition and (5) an armourers' shop of wood one story in height,fi] 
a good state of preservation. 

INLAND REVENUE OFFICES. 

■ This building, formerly used as a Post Office, (described in Eeport of Comi 
sioner [of Public Works, 1867), was vacated on the completion of the present Pc 
Office in 1873-74, when it was fitted up for the Assistant Keceiver General's ai 
Inland Eevenue Offices. These alterations, etc., were completed in 1874-75. 

Building warmed by steam; gas and water from the city services. 

Architect — Mr. Henry Langley. 

POST OFFICE. 

During the fiscal year, 1870-71, a site was acquired fronting on Adelaide stre 
immediately opposite the end of Toronto street, and extending back to Stanley stre 
120 feet by 180 feet. 

A contract was signed on the 16th March, 1871, for the construction of 
building, which was completed and occupied during 1873-74. 

The building has a frontage of 75 feet, and extends the full depth of the 1 
The front wall and a 12 feet return on each of the side walls are of stone, and t 
remaining external walls are brick, facing bricks being white ; roof of wood, cove] 
with slates and galvanized iron. 

There is a basement 137 feet by the width of the building, and a ground fli 
which extends throughout, while the front portion of the building for a depth of 
feet is carried two storeys higher. In the basement is accommodation for heatifi] 
boilers, fuel, etc. 

The ground floor accommodates the local Post Office; the first and second i 
has Postmaster's and Inspector's Offices, etc . ; brick safes are provided on gr 
floor. 

The style of architecture is modern classic. The front elevation has the cen 
and two ends slightly projected ; each storey is strongly marked by moulded dente 
cornices. The wall surface is divided vertically between openings in the ceni 
portions by columns and in the end projections by piers. 

The roof on front elevation is broken by a central dome containing a clock a 
two truncated angle pavillions. 

Warming is by steam. Gas and water from city services. 

Architect, Mr. Henry Langley. 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 

The Custom House built in 1846 (described in the Eeport of the Commissioi 
of Public Works, 1867) was found unsuitable and deficient in accommodation, anc 
contract was entered into during 1872-73 for the construction of a new building 
the original site on the corner of Yonge and Front Streets, which building was coj 
pleted and occupied in 1876-77. 

The new building is in the Italian Eenaissance style of architecture. It faces 
Front street, on which it extends 63 feet, and on Yonge street 112 feet. 

The walls of basement are of stone from Georgetown, Ont., and those of 
superstructure of Ohio stone. 

The Front street elevation is divided vertically into three bays by pilasters 
columns richly carved and moulded, the centre bay, containing the principal entrai 
being slightly projected and carried up, breaking the roof and finishing with a cl< 
pediment ; horizontally the floor lines are marked by moulded and carved strings " 
cornices which are carried round the principal fronts. 

194 



£6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The roof is constructed of wood, covered with slate and galvanized iron. 

Floors of wood. 

Brick safes are provided for the various branches. 

There is a basement, a ground, a first, a second and an attic floor, the latter 
nfinished. 

The basement contains boiler and fuel rooms, store rooms, etc. On the ground 
oorare the guagers', lockers', landing-waiters', surveyors' lavatories, etc. The first 
oor is the long room, collectors' clerks' and messengers' offices, lavatories, etc. On 
ie second floor are the caretaker's quarters. 

The long room is 60 feet by 40 feet, and 40 feet in height, the finish being highly 
nate. 

The building is warmed by steam and has gas and water throughout. 

Architect, Mr. E. C. Windeyer. 

EXAMINING WARE HOUSE. 

This building is situated in the rear of the Custom House with frontages of 115 
et on Yonge Street and 86 feet on Esplanade Street. It is four storeys in height. 

The walls are brick with foundation of stone. 

Window heads are circular, enclosing two openings and a medallion in the panel. 

Floors are of iron and brick, covered with wood, supported on iron columns and 
he'Mrders; ceilings of corrugated iron. 

,]|)i The style of architecture is simple in character and the building has a solid and 
wjbstantial appearance. 

It contains a steam hoist for elevating and lowering merchandise. 

Buildings heated by steam. 

Gas and water supplied from the city services. 

Architect, Mr. W. Irving. 

IMMIGRANT BUILDINGS. 

This depot is situated at the east of Strachan avenue on a plot of ground 6^ 
ires in extent ; bounded on the north by the Grand Trunk Railway track, and on 
|j south by the Great Western Railway track. 

The buildings are of wood, viz. : 

(1.) A landing and sleeping shed two storeys in height. 

(2.) A dining hall, having cook house and store and cellarage attached. 

(3.) Ticket office and messengers' dwelling. 

(4.) Eaggage shed . 

(5.) Wash house, tank and pump. 

(6.) Latrines. 

Plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 

MAGNETICAL OBSERVATORY. 

This building has been described in detail in the Report of the Commissioner of 
|bHc Works for 1867. 

COUNTY OF YORK, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Sharon. — A wooden building, 82 feet by 46 feet, with an armoury 40 feet by 7" 
3 attached, situated on Lot 9, Concession 3, Township of Gwillimbury. 
vas erected in 1868, and is in a good condition. 

2. Sutton. — Shed 82 feet by 47 feet, with armoury and clothing rooms at end, 
Uted on a quarter-acre lot, a part of Block 8, Concession 7, Township of Georgina \ 

air condition. Erected in 1869. 

195 
10 a— 13J 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1S& 



3. Toronto. — The drill shed is of brick, 160 feet bv 100 feet, somewhat out oj 
repair; it has armouries, stores, orderly rooms and officers' rooms attached. It 
situated between East and West Market streets, and was erected in 1877. 

COUNTY OF HALTON, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Acton West. — A wooden building, 80 feet by 46 feet, with armoury 16 fe 
by 12 feet, at south end ; situated on the corner of Bower and Elgin streets. Bui 
in 1868 and now in good condition. 

2. Stewartown. — The shed is P0 feet by 50 feet, including an armoury 15 ii 
by 10 feet. It is situated on lot 15, 8th concession of Esquesing, and was built n| 
1868; now in good condition. 

3. Nelson. — A 50 feet by 80 feet wooden shed, in a good state of repair] 
situated on a lot 100 feet by 80, on Dundas street, in concession 2, Township 
Nelson. Erected in 1868. 

4. Nassagaweya. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 50 feet, including an armoui 
situated in concession 2, Township of Nassagaweya. Built in 1868 and in a fair stat 
of preservation at present. 

5. Georgetown. —A wooden building, 80 feet by 48 feet, with an armoury lj 
feet by 10 feet attached ; situated on part of lot 43, east of Market street. Built ij 
1868, and now in a fair condition. 

6. Norval. — A wooden shed, 80 feet by 46 feet, in good condition ; erected in 187^ 

STREETSVILLE (COUNTY OF PEEL.) 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden build ng, 80 feet by 40 feet, resting on stone piers, erected in 186j|}T| e . 
and now in a dilapidated condition. 

COUNTY OF WENTWORTH, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Dundas. — A wooden shed on stone foundations, 100 feet by 60 feet, with 
armoury, a band room and a clothing room attached, all in need of repair excepting 
armoury. This building is situated on the easterly part of Lot 24, between Kin 
Market Hall and Militia Streets, and was built in 186*8. 

2. Benbrook. — A shed SO feet by 40, with armoury 20 feet by 14 feet attached, 
situated on Lot 1, Concession 3, Block 4, in the Township of Benbrook. It waserec 
in 1868 and is now in a good state of repair. 

3. Watertown — Size of shed, 80 feet by 48 feet, with an armoury 17 feet by 
feet attached, both in a fair condition, situated on Lot 7, Concession 3, Flamborougj 
on the east side of Main Street, and south of Dundas Street. Erected in 1868. 

4. Stony Creek — Shed y of wood 80 by 48 feet, with armoury 14 feet by 12 fe 
attached, both in good condition, situated on lot 24, Con. 4, in the Township of Sa 
fleet, and erected in 1873. 

5. Hamilton. — A wooden shed 213 feet by 80 feet with brick armouries (attache 
to North side) 19 feet by 13 feet, situated on the east side of James Street betwe«j 
Common and Robert streets, erected by Corporation of the City of Hamilton a?f 
purchased by the Dominion Government in 1877. 

It is now in need of repairs. 

HAMILTON. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

Was fully described in the Report of Commissioner of Public Works, 1867. 
Essential repairs only have been executed since the last mentioned date. 

VJti 



: 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A.. 1883 



POST OFFICE. 

The original building was described in the Report of the Commissioner of 
blic Works 1867. 
An addition was made in 1872-73 in keeping with the existing work, the busi- 
having been largely increased. 

Warming is by hot air furnaces ; gas and water supplied from the city services. 
Architect, Mr. F. J, Rastrick. 

ST. CATHARINES. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 



:: 



! 



A building site with frontages of 80 feet and 154 feet on Queen and King streets 
respectively, was secured in 1880-81, and a building is now in progress with a front- 

of 6*2 feet on Queen street and 64 feet on King street. 

The walls are to be brick (with stone dressing and portico) resting on a stone 
bundation and with wooden floors and roof ; roof covering to be galvanized iron on 
lats and slates on slopes. 

There is to be a basement containsng heating apparatus, fuel rooms and store 
•oom ; a ground floor occupied by the Post Office, a first floor devoted to the Custom 
louse and Inland Revenue, and an unfinished attic. 

Brick safes will be provided for the various departments. The Post Office 
ntrance is to be on King street, and that of the Custom House on Queen street. 

Architect, Mr. R. C. Windeyer. 

NIAGARA BARRACKS AND HOSPITAL 

These properties were handed over to the Provincial Government of Canada by 
he Imperial Authorities in 1856. 

1. Large Barracks. — A two storey building on a stone foundation, having walls 
flogs on first storey and of frame brick-nogged above. It is 80 feet by 226 
set, covered with a wooden roof, and now in a fair condition. 

2. Man's Cook-Rouse. — A one storey log building on a stone foundation, 40 feet by 
5 feet, and now in a good condition. 

3. Mess Room and officers' Quarters. — A one story frame building, brick-nogged 
nd clapboarded, 120 feet by 30 feet, and with stone wine-cellars attached ; all now in 
ood condition. 

4. Barrack Stables. — Two frame buildings clapboarded and with shingle roofs ; 
ich one storey and loft; 84 feet by 46 feet, and in fair condition. 

5. Wash-house. — A one storey wooden building, now occupied as a dwelling 
nd in poor state of repair. 

6. Staff Sergeants' Quarters. — A one and a-half storey log and clapboarded building 
ith a two storey orderly room attached, both in fair condition ; size, about 30 feet 
y 30 feet. 

7. Wash-house, (now a Stable). — One storey, clapboarded, 24 feet by 18 feet, on a 
cket foundation and generally dilapidated. 

8. Officers' Stables. — A one storey frame and clapboard buildinsr 60 feet by 16 
et. 

9. Commissiariat Office, store and Barrack rooms. — A two storey and basement 
e and clapboard building, with stone foundation, 60 feet by 30 feet. 

10. Gun-shed now Store-house. — A one storey frame and clapboarded building, 96 
et by 24 feet, on a stone fonudation, and in need of repairs. 

11. Provision Store-house. — A one storey frame and clapboard building, 41 feet by 
feet, on cedar posts and in good condition. 

12. Commissariat Quarters. — A part brick and part wooden, one storey, and one 
"rey and a-half, having stable and coach house adjoining, all in a good state of repair. 

197 



, 



46 Victoria. Sessional Tapers (No. 10.) A. II 



13. Barrack Master's Quarters. — A one storey frame and clapboard building, in 
good state of preservation, with a good log stable and coach-house adjoining. 
, 14. Commandant's Quarters. — Surned in 1858. 
15. Garrison Hospital. — Burned in 1880. 

FORT MISSISAGUA. 

This is an earthwork, inclosing the following buildings, viz. :— 

1. Block House. — Brick, one storey building about 50 feet square, with aflat roo 
consisting of two rooms, and now in a ruinous condition. 

2. Magazine.— A brick building, 16 feet 6 inches by 11 feet 6 inches, and oi 
storey in height. 

3. Quarters for officers and men. — Five log buildings, each 14 feet wide, one 
which is 27 feet long, two 60 feet, one 45 feet, and one 100 feet, all in a ruinous co 
dition and beyond repair. 

PORT DALHOUSIE. 

CUSTOM HOUSE AND CANAL OFFICE. 

This building is situated at St. Catharines, and was fully described in the Bepo 
of the Commissioner of Public Works, 1867. 

COUNTY OF WELLAND, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Fenwick. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 40 feet, situated on lot 16, concession 
in the township of Pelham. 

2. Fori Erie. — A wooden shed 84 feet by 44 feet, in a fair condition, situated 
the corner of Princess and Victoria streets. Erected in 1868. 



COUNTY OF HALDIMAND, ONT. 



DRILL SHEDS. 



1. York. — A two company wooden shed 100 feet by 60 feet, in good repair, 
situated on the corner of King and Albion streets and were erected in 1868. 

2. Caledonia. — A wooden shed 100 feet by 50 feet with two armouries, each I 
by 12 feet attached, in a good state of repair. It is situated between Caithness str4l 
and the river and was built in 186 3. 

3. Hagarsville. — A wooden shed 81 feet by 51 feet with armory attached, 16 ft; 
by 12 feet, both in good condition. It is situated on Lot 13 in the Township of W- 
pole. 

4. Hullsville. — Shed 100 feet by 50 feet, with armouries 44 feet by 7 feet, all 
good repair, situated on Lot No. 41, Berthier Street ; and was erected in 1868. 

5. Cheapside. — A wooden shed 85 feet by 25 feet, with an armoury 15 feet by 
feet attached, both in want of repair, situated on Queen street and erected in 1868 

6. Cayuga. — Drill shed 80 feet by 48 feet, with armoury 16 feet by 10 feet, 
in good condition. Erected in 1877. 

SIMCOE, (COUNTY OF NORFOLK.) 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden shed, 100 feet by 50 feet, built in 1868. 

198 



146 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A, 1883 



BBANTFOKD. 



POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 



This buildiug is on the corner of George ' and Dalhousie streets, extending 62 
at on former and 53 on latter. 

The walls of the building are brick on a stone foundation, and there are base- 
mt, ground, first and attic floors. 

The basement furnishes accommodation for boiler and fuel rooms and closets. 

The ground floor is the post office, the second floor is occupied by the Customs 

Inland Eevenue Offices, and the attic is finished as caretaker's rooms. 

The weights and measures office is accommodated in a one story brick building 
yard. 

Heating of building by steam ; gas and water!?from the city services. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this department. Superintending architect, Mr. John 
L«nry. 

COUNTY OF BKANT. 

DRILL SHED. 

1. Brantford. — A wooden shed 150 feet by 90 feet, with armoury 18 feet by 9 
teet and caretakers quarters, 54 feet by 18 feet attached, all in good condition. It 
is bounded by Colbourne , Canning, Dalhousie and Peel streets, and was erected in 1868. 

3. Burford. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 44 feet, with an armoury 44 feet by 16 
bet attached, erected on the Hamilton and London road, on lot No. 3, concession 7, 
n the township of Burford. It is in need of repair. Erected in 1868. 

COUNTY OF WATEKLOO, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Cross Hill— The shed is of wood 80 feet by 46 feet, and the armoury, which is 
it the south of shed, is^48 feet by 3 feet. Built in 1868; wooden foundation decayed. 

2. Hespeler. — A frame building vertical boarded and battened, with shingled 
xx>f, 80 feet by 48 feet, with an armoury 16 feet by 12 feet, situated on George street. 
Built 1869, and now in fair condition. 

3. Berlin. — A wooden shed and armoury 150 feet by 66 feet erected on the east- 
rn side of Queen street 1-2 mile from centre of town on park grounds, the property 
if the Municipality. Erected in 1868. 

GUELPH. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 

A site was procured for this building at the intersection of Wyndham and 
)ouglas streets, facing St. George's Square. A contract for construction was entered 
jato in 1873-74 and the building completed during the fiscal year 1877-78. ^ 

The external walls are of local stone and the internal walls of brick. The 
wilding covers an area of 2,800 feet and is two stories in height exclusive of base- 
lent and attic. 

Basement floor is appropriated for Examining Warehouse, fuel room and closets. 
ie ground floor contains the Post Oflice and the first floor is occupied by the Custom 
nd Inland Eevenue Oflices. 

Brick safes are provided for the Post Oflice. 

Building heated by stoves. Gas and water from the city services. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

199 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188& 

COUNTY OF WELLINGTON, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Hallen. — A frame building, 80 feet by 48 feet; erected in 1868, on Mail 
street, lot 17, concession 6, Maryborough, and is now in fair condition. 

2. Guelph. — This is a stone building, 70 feet by 35 feet; erected in 1876 on the; 
agricultural grounds ; now in good condition . 

3. Erin, — A wooden building, 80 feet by 48 feet, on the west side of Main streetj 
a part of the east half of lot 15, in the 9th concession of the Township of Erin, andj 
parts of village lots 11 and 13 with all of 12. Built in 1868, and now in a fair state? 
of repair. 

WHITTINGTON, (COUNTY OF DUFFERIN.) 

DRILL SHED. 

Size of shed, 80 feet by 46 feet, with an armoury 14 feet by 10 feet ; erected ii 
1868, and now in a bad state of repair. It is located on 16t No. 16, concession lj 
Amaranth. 

COUNTY OF PERTH, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Stratford.— Shed 150 feet by 80 feet ; situated on lots 224 and 557, frontii 
on Albert and Brunswick streets. Built in 1869, and now im good condition. 

2. Blanchard.—A. frame building, 8t feet by 219 feet, in a very bad state o! 
repair; erected on lot 16, 14th concession, East Mitchell Road, in the year 1869. 

COUNTY OF HURON, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1* Exeter. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 50 feet, with an armoury 20 feet by llj 
feet, erected on part of Lot 18, Concession 1, Usborne, in the year 1868, and is in 
fair state of preservation. 

2. Dungannon. — Size 80 feet by 48 feet, with site of same size. Erected on S 
Joseph street in 1869 and now in good condition. 

3. Bayfield. — Of wood,85 feet by 45 feet, with an armoury 18 by 14 feet attached! 
the site is J acre in extent fronting on Market Square. Built in 1868 and now some 
what dilapidated. 

4. Gorrie. — A wooden building 80 feet by 48 feet, and now much out of reps 
It is situated on the corner of John and Wellington streets, and was built in 1869. 

5. Porter's Hill.— Shed 80 feet by 46 feet and armory 20 feet by 14 feet, situat 
on Lot 26, Concession 7, Township of Goderich. Built in 1871 and now in fair con| 
dition. 

6. Clinton. — A wooden building 80 by 46 feet, with an armoury in rear 20 feel 
by 10 feet, both in fair condition. Erected in 1871 on Orange street. 

COUNTY OF GREY, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Owen Sound. — A wooden shed, 100 feet by 50 feet, in a fair state of preserve 
tion, situated on the southwest corner of the Public Pleasure Ground ; built in 188( 

2. Meaford.— Shed 80 feet by 46 feet, with armoury 29 feet by 12 feet, situate; 
on lot 20, Collingwood street, Market Square, which is 102 feet by 80 feet ; erecteci 
1869, and now in good order, 

200 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



3. Annan. — Drill shed and armoury in a wooden building 60 feet by 40 feet 
which is in a fair state of preservation ; erected on lot 34, concession C, in township 
of Sydenham, in the year 1875. 

4. Clarksburg. — A shed 80 feet by 48 feet, with armoury, 16 feet by 12 feet, 
attached, both in tolerably good repair ; erected on the east side of William street, 
and south side of Clark street, on Lot 30, Concession 10, Township of Collingwood, in 
the year 1869. 

5. Flesherton. — A wooden one company shed, regulation size, situated on Lot 150, 
Eange 1, east of Toronto and Sydenham Eoad; erected in 1869, and now in good 
order. 

6. Dunham. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 50 feet, erected on Lot 24, Division 2, 
east of the Garafraxa Koad, in 1867, and now in good condition. 

COUNTY OF BEUCB, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Walkerton. — A shed, 144 feet by 80 feet, in a good state of repair; erected on 
Lot 1, east side of Yictoria street, in the year 1870. 

2. Southampton. — Shed 60 feet by 200 feet, with armoury in rear 20 feet by 12 
feet, situated ' on a lot containing one-sixth acre at the corner of High and Albert 
streets. 

3. Teeswater. — Shed 80 feet by 40 feet, situated on a lo containing one-fifth acre 
on Marv^vr «+raAt • built in 1874, and now in fair condition* 



LONDON.] 



POST OFFICE. 



The original building has been fully described in the Eeport of the Commissioner 
of Public works, 1867. 

During 1870-71 an additional piece of land was acquired to increase the yard 
room, and in 18^3-74 an addition to the building was made which furnished accom- 
modation for sorting of letters, and a dwelling for the caretaker. 

Building heated by stoves, gas and water from the city services. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. Superintending architect, Mr. Wm, 
Eobinson. 

CUSTOM HOUSE. 

The site chosen for this building is in the central portion of the City, at the 
itersection of North and Eichmond streets. It was purchased in 1869-70and in the 
te year a contract entered into for the construction of the building which was 
ompleted in 1873-74. 

It consists of a main building three stories in height, covering an area of 30,509 
feet, and a one story annexe for examining warehouse, covering an area of 1,204 feet. 
Walls are Ohio stone ; internal walls of brick ; roof of wood covered with 
galvanized iron on deck and slate on slopes. 

The architecture is modified Italian. The basement furnishes rooms for ther 
caretaker, and the remaining floors are used as offices for Customs and Inland Eevenue. 
Wanning is by steam ; gas and water supplied from city services. Architect 
Wm. Eobinson: 






MILITIA BUILDING. 



Grounds were fenced in and wooden outbuildings erected in 1876-77. 

201 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



IMMIGRATION SHED. 

Is situated on a wedge shaped lot, three and one-haif acres in area, lying between 
the lines of the Grand Truck and Great Western Railways, a mile from the city of | 
London. 

It is two stories in height, constructed of wood on a stone foundation, and covers 
an area of 2,808 square feet. 

Buildings warmed by stoves. Architect, Mr. Wm. Robinson. 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, ONT. 



DRILL SHEDS. 

1. City of London. — Two brick sheds and armouries, one 113 feet 6 inches by 71 
ieet ; in good condition ; situate on Central avenue and Wellington street, on Do- 
minion Government property ; the other, 143 feet by 43 feet, located in the centre 
of Militia grounds ; both built 1864. 

2. Strathroy. — A white brick shed 50 feet by 20 feet, on a lot of same size, 
situated on north side of Market Square, and is in good condition. Erected 1868. 

3. Lucan. — Shed 60 feet by 40 feet, with armoury 20 feet by 14 feet ; both of 
wood and in bad repair ; erected on lot 154, in the year 1871. 

4. Marrietsville. — A wooden building 60 feet by 24 feet, with armoury over, 
situated on lot No. 12, concession 5, township of Dorchester. Building erected in» 
1868. 

5. Park Mill, — A wooden shed and armoury, the former 80 feet by 44 feet, the[ 
latter 16 feet by 16 feet, situated on lots 3 and 4, Mill street North. In a bad state 
©f repair. Erected 1870. 

6. Wardsvitle. — A wooden one company shed 80 feet by 48 feet, with an armoury 
48 feet by 8 feet; erected on lot 9, south side of Main street, in 1867. In very b 
state of repair. 

COUNTY OF ELGIN, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. St. Thomas.— Size 112 feet by 60 feet, with armouries at either end 60 feet 
14 feet ; also cavalry armouries and stores. 

The lot measures 280 feet on Anne street, 133 feet on Crocker street, and 220 
Elgin. In want of repair. 
Built in 1868. 

2. Wallacetown. — A shed 80 feet by 50 feet ; is situated on the Agricultural 
grounds, a part of Lot 12, Concession 8. Building in good condition. Erected 1870 

3. Aylmer. — Shed 80 feet by 42 feet, with an armoury 16 feet by 10 feet attached .; 
situated on Lot No. 13, Concession 7, Township of Malahide. Building in fair con 
dition. 

Built in 1877. 

4. Vienna. — Shed 80 feet by 40 feet, in good state of repair, situated on Lot 16 
corner of Elm and Ann streets, good state of preservation. Erected 1868. 



ST. THOMAS. 

POST OFFIC1, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 

The site of the C.W. Presbyterian Church, on Lots 4 and 5, Talbot street, has be 
purchased by the Dominion Government, and plans are in course of preparation for 
building thereon to be occupied by the local Postal, Customs and Inland Revenu 

services. 

202 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



COUNTY OF LAMBTON, ONT. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Widder. — A wooden shed 8? feet by 4f) feet with an armoury 50 feet by 4 
feet, situated on lot 19, Lewis street. 

Erected in 1868 and now in fair condition. 

2. Forest. — Shed 84 feet by 45 feet with an armoury 10 feet by 9 feet, erected on 
a site on the Government property, 210 feet by 66 feet in 1873. Shed in a good state 
of preservatien. 

3. Watford. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 47 feet, armoury (at west end) erected 
on a lot on St. Clair street in 1868, now in good repair. 

4. Warwick. — Shed 80 feet by 40 feet with armoury 40 feet by 4 feet situated on 
lot 13 South Egremont street, which measures 85 feet by 45 feet. 

Erected in 1868 and now in fair condition. 

COUNTY OF KENT, ONT. 
CHATHAM. 

DRILL SHEDS. 

1. Chatham. — This building is 112 feet by 60 feet, situated on north side of Col- 
foorne street south of the Parkr Erected in 1868. 

2. Tilbury East' — A wooden building 80 feet by 46 feet, with an armoury and 
clothing room 12 feet by 8 feet, now in a fair state of repair, erected on part of lot 
No. 10 M. Road south, in the year 1870. 

3. Bothwell. — Size 80 feet by 47 feet, of wood, and in a bad state of repair. It 
was erected on a lot on the corner of Main and Walnut streets, in the year 1868. 

4. Dresden. — A wooden shed 80 feet by 40 feet, with an armoury 10 feet by 16 
feet attached, both much decayed ; erected on a lot No. 41 west side of Cross street 
measuring 66 feet by 132 feet. 

INFANTRY BARRACKS. 

This barracks is situated on the Military Reserve and was transferred to the Pro- 
vincial Government of Canada by the Imperial authorities in 1856. 

1. Barrack Building. — A two storey wooden structure 288 feet by 48 feet 8 inches, 
built to accommodate 400 men. On the ground floor are eight barrack rooms, a 
school room, a sergeants' mess, a kitchen, an orderly room and a regimental store ; 
on the upper floor are twenty barrack rooms. 

2. Magazine — 32 feet by 30 feet, with brick walls and eheet metal roof covering. 
There were also a number of detached outbuildings. 

With the exception of the magazine, the buildings were removed in 1879, 
-being in a dilapidated condition. 

WINDSOR. 

POST OFFICE, CUSTOM HOUSE, ETC. 

This Department purchased a site fronting on Oulette,Pitt and Chatham streets 
and in 1878-79 entered into a contract for constructing the necessary buildings which 
Was completed in 1879-80. 

Accommodation is provided for the Post Office, Customs and Inland Revenue. 

The facade on Oulette and Pitt streets have walls of stone coursed ashlar with 
tooled and moulded dressings, the remaining external walls being brick. Internal 
walls are partly brick and partly wood, roof of wood covered with slates on slope and 
galvanized iron on deck. 

The main building consists of basement, ground, first and attic floors. 

203 



m 
i 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



The basement contains a boiler room, a fuel room and store rooms; on the ground J. 
floor is the Post Office and Customs Examining Warehouse, and on the first floor 
Customs and Inland Eevenue Offices. The caretaker occupies the attic. 

Erick safes are provided for the various Departments. 

A detached building in yard is occupied by the Inland Eevenue Department. 

The building is warmed by steam, and supplied with gas and water from the-j 
city services. Superintending Architect, Mr. Wm. Scott. 



PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 






WINNIPEG. 

FORT OSBORNE HUT BARRACKS. 

Built in 18*72 and consists of wooden buildings, which, with the exception of 
No. 24, are all one-storey. 

1 to 10. Each 19 feet by 26 feet, accommodating 30 men. Nos. 1 
to 5 of these are occupied by the Department of Agriculture for immigration 
purposes; No. 6 is used as an armoury; Nos. 7 and 8 are clothing stores; No 
9 is a recreation room ; No. 10a staff-officers' quarters. 

11 and 12. The former a storekeeper's residence, and the latter a captain' 
residence ; are each 40 feet by 25 feet . 

13 to 17. Cook-houses.— Each 26 feet by 19 feet. 

18. Hospital. — 49 feet 6 inches by ^7 feet 6 inches. 

19. Guard-room. — Used as a powder store. 

20. Bake-house. — 27 feet by 19 feet; used for storing shot and shell. 

21. Ice-house. — 21 feet by 17 feet 6 inches. 

22. Shed.— 30 feet by 18 feet. 

23. Latrines. — 17 feet by 14 feet. 

24. Canteen. — A two storey building, 45 feet 4 inches, by 20 feet 4 inches. 

25. Stable. — Accommodation for sixteen horses. 

26. Cattle Shed— 42 feet by 12 feet. 

27. Old Magazine. — Abandoned. 

28. Old Root House. — Caved in. 

29. Ice House. — 30 feet 8 inches by 17 feet 6 inches. 

POST OFFICE. 

This building was placed under contract in 1873-74, and completed and occupi 
in 1875-76. It is a two storey brick building on the corner of Main and Owen stree 
having a stone foundation and wooden roof. 

It consists of a main building 50 feet b\ 40 feet, with a projection for stairc 
and vaulted safe 25 feet by 10 feet. 

The front is divided by piers into three bays, which are horizontally divided 
string courses of ornamental brick work. 

There is an ornamental clock pediment on roof over central entrance. 

The local Post Office occupies the entire ground floor and Inspector's Offi< 
Savings Eank and Assistant Eeceiver General's Office the first floor. 

Owing to the rapid increase of postal business, it was found necessary during th 
past year to make a one storey addition of wood in the rear to allow of the extensio: 
of the public lobby. The screen in lobby has been fitted with lock letter boxes, anq 
such additional fittings provided as were required for the easier working of the office! 

Building heated by stoves. Plans, &c, prepared by this Department. Eesiden.< 
Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 

204 



i 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



CUSTOM HOUSE. 

Was constructed during 1873-71, on Block 3, Main street, having a frontage of 
54 feet, with a depth of 56 feet, and adjoining the Dominion Lands Office. The 
building is of brick on a stone foundation with roof of wood, and has ground, first and 
attic floors; the ground floor contains the Custom House and Inland .Revenue Offices, 
and the remaining portion of the building is the residence of the Collector of Customs. 

Building heated by stoves ; plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 
Eesident Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 

LANDS OFFICE. 

Construction was commenced in 18*73, and the building completed and occupied 
during 1875-76. 

It is situated on Block 3, Main street, 74 feet from Custom House which it 
adjoins, and has a frontage of 41 feet. The walls are brick on a stone foundation, 
there being ground and first floors and an unfinished attic. 

The building is occupied by the Dominion Lands Office for the Province. 

Warming is by stoves ; plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 
Eesident Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 

FORT GARRY IMMIGRANT SHED. 

This is a wooden building, 21 feet by 180 feet, one storey in height, is situated 
on the property of the Hudson's Bay Company. 

It is divided into thirty compartments, and is at present occupied by the Jews 

IMMIGRANT HOSPITAL. 

This building was built during 1880-81 at Douglas Common, on the line of the 
Canada Pacific Eailway. 

It is a wooden two story building, 130 feet by 29 feet, with a wing in the rear. 
This building has been recently sold. 

PARLIAMENT HOUSE. 

This building, which is now in progress, is situated between Broadway and 
Lewis street, bounded on the south by the Assiniboine Eiver, covering a superficial 
area of 6,524 square feet. There will bo a basement with stone walls, containing a 
boiler house, a fuel room and seven offices. The walls of superstructure will be brick 
with quoins and dressing of stone. On the ground floor will be a Legislative Chamber, 
40 feet square on plan, and seven offices, brick safe, etc. ; the first and attic floor will 
contain each nine offices. 

Floors and roofs are to be wood covered with shingles on slopes and galvanized 
iron on flats. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 



lieutenant-governor's residence. 

This building is now in course of erection on the Government reserve and will 
have stone foundations, brick walls and wooden floors and roof. 

There will be a basement, two full storeys and an attic ; the basement to contain 
a kitchen, a scullery, a still room, a cellar, a pantry, a larder, and a furnace and a 
fuel room ; the ground floor, a drawing room, a dining room, a breakfast room, and 
a library, all communicating by folding doors and forming a suite of rooms, 96 feet 
by 20 feet ; also a serving room, and His Honour's business offices ; the remaining 
storeys contain bed rooms. 

205 






46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Drawings and specifications prepared by this Department. 
Eesident Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Locourt. 

STONY MOUNTAIN. 

MANITOBA PENITENTIARY. 

This building is situated on Stony Mountain, distant 14 miles from the City of | 
Winnipeg. 

Works were commenced in 1873-74, and carried on to completion and occupation 
in 1876-77. 

The part of the building erected consists of the administration portion and one 
wing of prison, the former being two storeys with attic and basement, and contains 
living rooms and offices, and covers an area of 4,377 square feet ; the prison covers 
an area of 3,010 square feet, and consists of a basement with 12 female cells, wash 
and bath rooms, water closets, boiler and fuel rooms, dining hall and kitchen, and a 
ground floor with three tiers of cells, having twenty each on first and second tiers 
and fifteen on third tier; the cells are placed in a double row in the centre of the 
wing facing outwards, with corridors 10 feet wide between them and outside walls, 
the upper tiers being approached by stairways and open galleries. 

Building heated by steam. 

Outbuildings have been erected with convict labour from time to time as follows,. 
viz. : — Three double and two single guards' dwellings, a school room, an ice house 
a horse stable and a piggery. 

There are now in course ofconstruction in the same manner cow stable, root 
house, smithy and carriage and implement house. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

Eesident Architect, Mr. J. P. M. Lecourt. 



NORTH-WEST TERRITORIES. 



BATTLEFORD. 
lieut.-governor's residence. 

The residence of the Lieut.-Governor was completed and ready for occupation 
in 1878. 

The walls were constructed of hewn logs resting on a stone foundation, the chinks- 1 
being filled with mortar ; inside the walls are strapped, lathed and plastered, and 
clapboarded ontside; the roof is shingled* there is a cellar under a partof the building. 

On the principal floor the accommodation consists of, (1) a reception room, 50 
feet by 30 feet ; (2) a dining room, 24 feet by 16 feet ; (3) a drawing room, 24 feet by 
16 feet, (4) a parlour, 15 feet by 16 feet, 2, 3 and 4 being arranged en suite with folding 
doors between, also (5) an office, (6) entrance hall, (7; hat and cloak room, (8)> 
kitchen and pantry. 

On the first floor are eight bedrooms. 

This building is warmed by stoves. 

The following buildings were erected and ready for occupation in 1878 : 

STIPENDIARY MAGISTRATE'S RESIDENCE. 

Is a two storey wooden building, having a dining room, a parlor, an office and a 
kitchen on the ground floor; and on the first floor six bed rooms. This building 
and the two following have stone foundations: 

206 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



registrar's residence. 

A two storey wooden building, containing a parlour, a dining room, a kitchen 
and four bed rooms. 

CLERK OP THE COUNCIL'S RESIDENCE. 

Is similar in construction to Lieutenant-Governor's residence, and contains a 
parlour, a dining room, a kitchen and three bed rooms. 

commandant's quarters. 
Consist of a parlour, a dining room, a kitchen, three bed rooms and a cellar. 

REGISTRY OFFICE. 

Walls are of brick, on a stone foundation ; the building is 43 feet by 24 feet, 
divided into three rooms — the two in front, for the storage of deeds, being vaulted 
and fire-proofed. The remaining room is an office ; doors throughout of iron, 1 and 
windows protected by iron guard bars and iron shutters. 

In addition to the above are the following police buildings : 

Barracks. 

Officers quarters. 

Quarters for married men. 

U 11 (( U 

Quarter-Master's stores. 
Workshops. 
Hospital. 

Stables to accommodate 160 horses. 

The office, official residence and barracks, &c, were erected from plans prepared 
by this Department. 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 



VICTORIA. 

POST OFFICE, SAVINGS BANK, PUBLIC WORKS AND INDIAN DEPARTMENT OFFICES. 

Building was erected in 18*73-74 and is two storeys in height with walls of stone 
and floors and roof of wood, the last mentioned being covered with tar and gravel. 

Owing to the disintegration of the stone in the street front wall a new front had 
to be constructed in 1879-80, and a re-arrangement of offices was made during the 

same year and that following. Architect, Hon. B. W. Pearse. 

/ 

CUSTOM HOUSE, INLAND REVENUE AND MARINE OFFICES. 

Construction was contracted for in 1873-74 and the works were completed in 

It is a brick building on a stone foundation, floors and roof of wood, the frontage 
is 40 feet and the depth 62 feet. 

In the basement are the caretaker's quarters, fuel room and examining ware- 
house, the ground floor has accommodation for Customs Department, viz., long room. 
Collector's office, landing waiters and clerks, offices, etc. On first floor are the Inland 
Revenue and Marine Offices. Brick safes are provided for the various Departments. 

Plans prepared by this Department. Superintending Architect, Mr. H. O. 
Tiedmann. 

20* 



4 G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



MARINE HOSPITAL. 



This is a stone building having an upper and a lower ward capable of accommo- 
dating forty patients, also the necessary offices, including physicians, residence, 
kitchens, wood house, dissecting room, bath rooms, etc. Works commenced in 1872- 
73, and completed in 1874-5. 

DRILL SHED. 

The main building is 1 10 feet by 35 feet, with lean-to offices, armouries and 
store, 15 feet wide, situated on south-west side of Menzies street, and requires to be 
repaired. 

NEW WESTMINSTER 

BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY. 

The site chosen was on Government Eeserve, New Westminster, on the right 
bank of the Eiver Eraser, comprising 77 acres. Construction was commenced in 
1874-75, and the building was completed and handed over to the Department of 
Justice in 1877-78. 

The part of the building erected is of stone with brick backing to outer walls 
and brick partitions and arches to cells. The roof is of wood, the front portion 
covering an area of 4,737 square feet, containing two storeys, with attic and base- 
ment, is used as living rooms and offices; the remaining, covering an area of 3,010 
square feet, is the prison, and consists of a basement which contains the heating 
apparatus, female cells, etc, and an upper storey with three tiers of cells for males, 
making a total of 67 cells (8 feet by 4 feet) in the entire prison ; the cells are placed 
in the centre of the wing with a 10-foot corridor on each side, the second and third 
tiers having iron galleries with iron stairs. 

The main entrance is in the centre of the ground floor, front opening into a 
corridor 8 feet wide, which divides this story into equal divisions and communicates 
with the prison. 

Ventilation is provided for by a brick vent shaft enclosing the furnace smoke 
stack. 

Plans, etc., prepared by this Department. 

Superintending Architect, Hon. B. W. Pearse. 

POST OFFICE AND CUSTOM HOUSE. 

Contract was entered into and works commenced in Dec, 1881, which are still 
in progress. The wall of building is to be brick with a stone foundation with stone 
dressing to external openings on principal front and will comprise ground, first and 
attic floors, roofing and floors of wood ; on ground floor there will be provision for 
Post Office, a Savings Bank and a Telegraph Office ; on the second floor will be the 
Custom House. 

Plans and specifications prepared by this Department. 

DRILL SHED. 

A wooden building 06 feet by 40 feet with a lean to armoury 24 feet by 12 feet, 
situated on Mackenzie street Lot 10, Block 13, and requires slight repairs. 



208 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 



APPENDIX No. 3. 



REPORT ON THE HARBOURS, RIVERS, ETC., 

THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION, 
From 1867 to 1882. 



BT 



H. F. PERLEY, CHIEF ENGINEER, 



10 a— 14 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 188S 



APPENDIX No. 3. 



REPORT ON HARBOURS AND PIERS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION, j 

FROM 1867, TO 1882. 



(No. 6,374 subj. Reports.) 

Chief Engineer's Office, 

Ottawa, 1st March, 1883. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit herewith statements having reference to the 
construction, improvement and maintenance of Harbors and Piers, etc., in the 
Dominion since 1st July, 1867, and up to 30th June, 1882. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY F. PERLEY. 
P. H. Ennis, Esq., Secretary, 

Public Works Department. 



! 



PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 



JOGGINS. 



This harbour is situated in Cumberland County, near the head and on the 
south-eastern side of the Chignecto Channel, and is the shipping place for the coal|| 
from the Joggins mines. 

In 1874 the sum of $10,000 was expended by the Department in adding 100 feet 
to the length of the pier already standing on the western side of the harbour, in flooring) 
and repairing the old part of the structure, in building a breakwater 170 feet inj? 
length on the eastern side and in the removal of a ledge of rock and an accumulation 
of gravel from the basin thus formed. 

The results of this work have been satisfactory as the gravel which formerly 
lodged inside the old pier and shoaled the harbour is now arrested by the eastern 
breakwater. 

Spring tides rise 41 feet and neaps 34J- feet. 



PORT GBEVILLE. 



I 



Port Greville, Cumberland County, is situated on the northern side of the Basin 
of Minas, at the mouth of Ratchford river. £t is about ten miles west of Parrs-! 
borough, and fifteen miles east of Cape D'Or. The harbour is formed by a high gravei 
bar which lies parallel to the shore, and on the inner side of which the river runs fo 
more than half a mile. This bar was always covered by high water at the time oj 
spring tides, and in the fall of 1882, a gale occurring during high tide the sea swept oi 
the summit for a length of 2,800 feet, and a depth of two and a half feet. The proj 
tection thus afforded by the beach was in a great measure destroyed, and to restor»i 
and improve it, a wall of cribwork 2,200 feet long with an average height of seve)| 
feet, was buiit in 1874, at a cost of $6,028. 

210 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1885 



PARRSBOROUGH. 

Parrsborough, Cumberland County, situated on the north side of the Basin of 
Minas, near the mouth of Partridge Island River, is the terminus of the Spring Hill 
and Parrsborough Railway and the principal point of communication between Cum- 
berland County and the Counties of Hants and Kings, on the south side of the Basin. 
In 1864-65 a pier was built by the Provincial Government, and in 1*78 and the three 
following years the Department expended $1,414.94 in repairing the damage done by 
ice, etc. 

PARTRIDGE ISLAND OR PARRSBOROUGH RIVER. 

During 1879-80 and 1881-82 the channel of the river, between its mouth and 
the village, has been improved by dredging at a cost of $4,500. 

MAITLAND. 

The village of Maitland is situated on the south shore of Cobequid Bay, at the 
mouth of the Shubenacadie River, the northern outlet of a canal which was projected 
I many years ago with the object of connecting Halifax Harbour and the Bay ofFundy, 
and partially executed, but subsequently abandoned. Maitland is the centre of a 
large district, in which, in former years, shipbuilding was largely carried on, and is 
j*till prosecuted to some extent. The steamers plying on the Basin of Minas make 
jthis a port of call. A landing pier was begun by the Department in 1873 and com- 
pleted in 1876, at a total cost of $6,341.99. 
Tides rise from 43J to 50 feet. 

CHEVERIE. 

Cheverie, Hants Co., is a village on the south shore of the Basin of Minas, near 
the mouth of the River Avon, and about sixteen miles from Windsor, the Shiretown. 

The principal trade of the place consists in the shipment of gypsum to the 
'nited States. The quantity, which varies according to the prices in the American 
larket, ranges from 20,000 to 60,000 tons per annum. 

A pier was built here by the Provincial Government, and, in 1873-74, the Depart- 
lent expended $2,338 88 in extending it 70 feet. 

Spring tides rise 48 feet, and neaps 40 feet. 

WINDSOR. 

Windsor is the shire town of Hants County. It is situated on the eastern bank 
the river Avon, and is one of the principal stations on the Windsor and Annapolis 
lilway. It is the centre of a fertile district and a place of considerable trade. 

During the summers of 1879-81 $1,627.60 were spent in deepening the water 
long the lace of the railway wharf. The work was done by hand during low water. 

avonport. 

Avonport, King's County, is at the mouth of the River Avon, and is a station 
m the Windsor and Annapolis Railway, distant 12 miles from Windsor. In 187*8 $50(X 
rere expended in repairing the landing pier. 

CANNING. 

The pier known as " Pickett's Wharf" is situated about two miles below the vil- 
age of Canning, Kings Co., near the mouth of the Habitant River which falls into 
he western side of the Basin of Minas. The work was commenced in 1845 and ex- 
ended in 1859-60 by the inhabitants' assisted by the Provincial Government. In 
878 the Department expended $500.00 in raising and repairing the structure. 

211 
10 a— 14J 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No.10.) 



A. 1888 



OAK POINT. 

Oak Point, now called Kingsport, Kings' County, is situated on the western shore 
of the Basin of Minas, between the mouth of the Cornwallis .River and Cape Blomidon. 

A pier 445 feet in length, built of piles, already stood here when the harbour was! 
taken in charge by the Department, but before any work was commenced all thoj 
rights of the Pier Company were transferred to the Crown. 

In 1873-74, the sum of $4,003 was expended in building cribwork 12 feet widi 
on the eastern or exposed side, for the purpose of breaking the force of the sea. 

In March, 1875, a contract was made for the extension of the pier 270 feet wil 
a width of 30 feet, in order to increase the area sheltered and afford earlier acoess to! 
the harbour, which owing to the great range of tides (from 40 to 48 feet) is di 
between half-ebb and half-flood. This work was completed in November, 1875. 

The total expenditure has been $24,577.20. 

scott's bay. 

Scott's Bay, Kings County, is situated in the Minas Channel, Bay of Fundy,] 
not far from Cape Split. In 1879 a breakwater 350 feet in length was built on th< 
western side of Jess Creek to form a harbour and shelter for vessels during soutHj 
westerly storms. The amount expended was $3,000.00. 

chipman's brook. 

Chipman's Brook, Kings County, is situated on the southern shore of the Bay 
Fundy, sixty-four miles east of Digby Gut.In 1877, a length of 60 feet was added 
the breakwater built by the Provincial Government. The amount expended wj 
$2,750. 

CANADA CREEK. 

Canada Creek, Kings Co., on the south shore of the Bay of Fundy, sixty milej 
eas* of Digby Gut, is a small harbour formed by two piers: the western built by thf 
residents of the locality and the Provincial Government, and repaired by the Depai 
raent in 1874 at a cost of $2,499.94, and the eastern 150 feet in length, built in 1878-j 
by the Department with an expenditure of $3,000.00. 

HARBORVILLE. 

Harborville, Kings County, is on the south shore of the Bay of Fundy, aboi 
nfty-five miles east of Digby Gut. In 1876 the breakwater, built some years befoi 
by the Provincial Government, was extended by the Department at a cost of $2,0( 

VICTORIA HARBOUR. 

Victoria Harbour, King's County, is situated at the mouth of Church Vault Broc 
on the southern shore of the Bay of Fundy about ten miles east of Margaretvilll 
The pier is 240 feet long and 25 feet wide, with an approach 328 feet long faced i 
crib-work. It was begun in 1864 and finished in 1867, having been built by 
inhabitants, assisted by the Provincial Government. In 1878 the sum of $1,000 
expended by the Department in repairing the work and raising it a height of 4 feetf 



MORDEN. 



Morden, or French Cross, King's County, is situated on the southern shore of 
Bay of Fundy, about fifty miles east of Digby Gut. In 1874 $3,000 were expend') 
in refacing the portion of the western breakwater built in 1849, by the Provinci 
Government, in the construction of a spur sixty feet in length to arrest and retain ' 

212 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 188 J 



ahingle, in sheathing the work where required, in building a bulkhead and in exca- 
vating the slip. In 1878 and "79, the pier was widened and a block twenty feet in 
length, built for the purpose of securing the outer end, which had become much 
decayed. The cost of these works was $2,500.06, making a total of $5,500.06. 

MARGARETVILLE. 

Margaretville is on the south shore of the Bay of Fundy, in Annapolis County, 
Ld about forty-two miles east of Digby Gut. A pier was begun here in 1837 by the 
rovincial Government, and subsequently extended to a length of 4*71 feet. When 
iken in charge by the Department in 1871 it was found to be much damaged by 
5a-worms and in need of extensive repairs, which were made in the two following 
>ars at a cost of $3,650. 

In 1&76 a further amount of $5,000 was expended in extending the pier, and in 
$79 $500 in repairs, making a total of $9,150. 

This is one of the two places selected as eligible for the formation of a harbour 
refuge, Harborville, thirteen miles to the eastward, being the other. 

PORT GEORGE. 

Port George, Annapolis County, is thirty-seven miles east of Digby Gut, on the 
mth shore of the Bay of Fundy. A breakwater 440 feet long was built by the Pro- 
incial Government prior to 1867, and subsequently another pier to the eastward of 
le first. In 1874 the harbour was taken in charge by the Department, and in that 
id the following year $7,000 were expended in repairing and refacing the western 
ier, which on examination was found to be much decayed and worm eaten. 

PORT LORNE, 

Port Lome, formerly Port Williams or Marshall's Cove, is thirty miles east of 
>igby Gut and in the County of Annapolis. In 1873-74 the sum of $3,500 was 
cpended in adding 67 feet to the length of the pier, built at the joint expense of the 
lhabitants and the Nova Scotian Government. This work was begun in 1835 and up 
1867 it is said to have cost about $16,000. In 1879 some necessary repairs were 
le at a cost of $745.76, making a total expenditure by the Department of $4,245.76. 

HAMPTON. 

Hampton or Chutes Cove, Annapolis County, is twenty-five miles east of Digby 
it. A small pier 165 feet in length was built near the western side of the Cove 
te years ago by the Provincial Government. The site was chosen by Com- 
asioners, apparently without professional advice, and was objectionable on many 
scounts. In 1879 an addition of 121 feet was made by the Department and the 
ider parts strengthened, with the hope of remedying some of the defects of location, 
"le cost of this was $3,000. In 1881 on further examination it was found that the 
final work had been badly undermined by the sea, and that owing to the 
JCtion of the pier the shingle was fast shoaling the water on the inside. It was 
lerefore decided to remove the structure to another site about half a mile eastward, 
lich has accordingly been done. 

The new pier is 246 feet long, and is better built and much better located than 
le old one. Its cost when completed will be $2,300, such of the materials of the 
•mer pier as were sound and fit for the purpose having been used in its construc- 
ion. Total expenditure by the Department, $4,752.37. 

DELAP's COVE. 

Delap's Cove, Annapolis County, is situated on the south coast of the Bay of 
indy, about 12 miles east of Digby Gut. In 1879, the sum of $2,150 was expended 

213 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 188$ 



in the construction of a breakwater 150 feet in length and a retaining wall of crib- 
work in line with the western side of the pier. 

ANNAPOLIS HARBOUR AND RIVER. 

The town of Annapolis Koyal was first settled by DeMouts, in 1604, and afterwards 
became the capital of the Province of Acadia. It is situated on the southern bank 
of the Annapolis Eiver, seven miles above its mouth at Goat Island. It is the 
Western terminus of the Windsor and Annapolis Kailway, and the point of connection 
with steamers running tri-weekly to St. John, N.B., and weekly to Boston, Mass. 
A company has recently been formed for the purpose of establishing aline of steamers 
direct to England. As the chief port of shipment for the products of the fertile 
Annapolis Yalley it is a place of considerable trade, It is accessible at all times of tide; 
the harbour and the river below the town having a depth at low water of from four to 
six fathoms The tides rise from 23 to 28 feet. The Department has expended $750 
in removing a reef near the Railway Wharf. 

Above the town the river is navigable at high water as far as Bridgetown, a di 
tance of 19 miles. A number of large boulders which formerly obstructed 1 th* 
channel have been removed at a cost of $ J, 333.77. 

DIGBY. 

The town of Digby is situated at tbe western end of Annapolis Basin. It is the 
present terminus of the Western Counties Railway, and a port of call for the steamer 
running between Annapolis and St. John, N. B., and Boston. The harbour is opei 
at all seasons. The pier, which stands at the northern end of the town, is 866 feel 
long, 37 feet wide for 560 feet and 45 feet wide for the remainder of its length. It if 
the only wharf in the place accessible at low water, the depth at the end being 1( 
feet with ordinary tides. 

Winds from between north and north north-east throw a heavy sea through tht 
Gut directly on to the pier, and if there is at such times much drift ice in the Basin; 
the structure is liable to severe damage. 

The first pier was built by the Government of Nova Scotia some years befor 
Confederation, and was nearly destroyed by the gales which prevailed in the Bay o:| 
Fundy in 1866 and 67. In 1869 Parliament granted $2,920 to assist in rebuilding 
This amount was transferred to the Provincial Government and expended by thei 
The pier as then built was of pile bents 12 feet apart for 560 feet of the length j 
oiext was a block of crib work 80 feet by 45 feet, the southern half of which w* 
-eloped to form the inclined plane rendered necessary by the great rise and fall 
tide (from 23 to 27 feet). This incline was finished by a block 170 feet long by 2!; 
feet wide, and the northern half of this portion was of pile bents 8 feet apart. Th«| 
outer end of the pier consisted of a block 56 feet by 45 feet and about 40 feet higl 
The whole of the northern face was close piled. 

In 1872 the sum of $1,650 was expended by the Department in completing am| 
repairing the pier. In 1874 a number of piles and braces were renewed, the out* 
block newly fendered and new joists and planking laid for the whole length, at a coe 
of $2,500.00. During a gale on 22nd February, 1879, a schooner, loaded with produc 
for the West Indies parted her cable and was swept bodily through the pier, carrying 
away a length of 130 feet. The cost of repairing this damage was $2,367-73. 

Sea worms (the limnoria terebrans) abound in these waters, and the piles ami 
other timbers are much weakened by them, the former in many canes being entire!] 
cut off. These require to be replaced from time and $888.57 was expended in 1881 
82 in work of this nature, making the total expenditure up to 30th June, 188$ 
$10,326.30. 

The principal exports of the town are cattle, sheep, fish and fruit. 

214 



46 VT.toria. Sessional Papers (No.10) A. 1885 



TROUT COVE. 

Trout Cove is situated on the Bay of Fundy coast of Digby neck, nearly mid- 
way between Digby Gut and Petit Passage. In 1858 the inhabitants, assisted by a 
grant from the Provincial Government, built a breakwater 200 feet long and 30 feet 
wide. In 1876 a block 175 feet long and 30 feet wide was added by the Department, and 
in 1880 and again in 1881 extensive repairs were made to the old part of the break- 
water, 100 feet of which had been completely destroyed by a storm in 1879. The 
total expenditure by the Department has amounted to $5,499.76. 

PL ympton . 

Plympton is situated on the south shore of St. Mary's Bay in Digby County, 
In 1874 and 1875 the sum of $3,543.1>7 was expended in the construction of a block 
34 feet square at the outer end of the pier, built some years before Confederation by 
the Provincial Government, and in general repairs to that structure. 

SISSIBOO RIVER. 

The Sissiboo Eiver flows into St. Mary's Bay. In 1875 the sum of $2,500,0® 
was spent in removing two rocky shoals which inteifered with the navigation. The 
town of Weymouth stands on its eastern lank and is a place of considerable trade. 

BELLEVEAU COVE, 

Belleveau, Digby County, is on the south-east shore of St. Mary's j^ay, and about 4 
miles from Weymouth. The harbour is formed by two breakwaters ; the eastern, built 
in 1825, and the western in 1853, at the joint expense of the Provincial Government 
and the inhabitants. In 1878, the Department expended $3,000 in putting those 
structures into thorough repair, and in the construction of an sddiiional length 
to the eastern pier. 

CHURCH POINT. 

Church Point is situated on the southern shore of St. Mary's Bay, Digby County] 
The breakwater was built about 36 years ago, at the joint expense of the Provin- 
cial Government and the local authorities. In 1876 the sum of $2,000 was expended 
Dy the Department in repairing the work, an equal amount having been furnished by 
the residents of the locality. 

SAULNlERSVILLE. 

Saulniersville, Digby County, is about three miles east of Meteghan Eiver, on 
the south shore of St. Mary's Bay. In 1876 the sum of $2,000 was expended, tog ether 
with a similar amount provided by the locality in repairing the breakwater and 
adding 100 feet to its length. 

METEGHAN RIVER. 

Meteghan Eiver falls into St. Mary's Bay about two miles north east of Meteghan 
Cove. The works consist of two breakwaters at the mouth of the stream, the south- 
ern nire hurdrcd feet lorg and the northern four hundred and eighty feet long, which 
were built by the Provircial Government. When the works came under the charge 
of the Department the older parts were much decayed, and extensive repairs needed 
which were made in 1873 by an expenditure of $4,500. In 1881 $2,000 were 
expended in rebuilding ard repairing parts of both, breakwaters, making a total of 
16,500. 

215 






46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No 10.) A. 188S 



METEGHAN COVE. 

Meteghan Cove, Digby County, is on the south shore of St. Mary's Bay, about 
twenty-five miles from Yarmouth, and forty from Digby. A pier was built at this 
place about forty-five years ago by the Government of Nova Scotia, and in 1875 this 
was extended and repaired by the Department at a cost of $1,000. 

In 1878 an additional length of one hundred feet was built, together with a por- 
tion of the spur at the outer end. The cost of this was $3,000. In 1881 the struc- 
ture was improved by the addition of fifty feet to the spur, the cost being $2,250. 
The Cove is now capable ot affording shelter to a considerable number of coasting 
vessels. Total expenditure by the Department, $15,202.79. 

CAPE ST. MART. 

Cape St. Mary, Digby Co., is the southern point ot the entrance to St. Mary's 
Bay. It is one of the best fishing stations on the coast; cod, haddock, pollock and 
herrings being caught in abundance. 

A breakwater now 310 feet long, was begun about thirty-six years ago, and has 
been built in sections by the inhabitants, assisted from time to time by small grants 
from the Provincial Government, amounting in all to about $1,200. From age and 
the action of the sea and ice, the work had become much dilapidated. It was partially 
rebuilt in 1881 82 by the Department at a cost of $2,000, and further repairs are now in 
progress, a grant of $2,500 having been made by Parliament for the purpose, 

SALMON RIVER. 

In 1874 the Department expended $2,656.03 in repairing and strengthening thi 
breakwater at Salmon Biver, 2^ miles south of Cape St. Mary, Digby County. Thig| 
structure was built some years before Confederation by the Government of Nova| 
Scotia. 

GREEN COVE. 

Green Cove, Yarmouth County, is situated about thirteen miles north of the! 
town of Yarmouth. The appropriation for this place was made upon condition thalf 
the portion of the works belonging to the " Pond Company " should be transferred tc; 
the Crown. This having been done, the amount of $4,500 was expended in extending 
the eastern breakwater a distance of 50 feet, in raising and widening the inner endfor| 
a length of 158 feet, and in constructing a spur 75 feet long on the Western Breakj 
water. 



CRANBERRY HEAD. 






Cranberry Head is about six miles north of Yarmouth. At this place a break- 
water was built some years ago by the iocal authorities . In 1876, the sum of $2,000.00} 
was expended by the Department in extending the work 150 feet, and, in 1878-79, i 
further sum of $1,000.08 in construction of an additional length of 50 feet, and ii 
repairing the older portions. In 1880, the sum of $499.95 was employed in repairing 
the damage done by a storm in August, 1879, making a total expenditure by th<i 
Department of $3,500.03. 

YARMOUTH. 

The town of Yarmouth is situated at the western extremity of the peninsula ojl 
Nova Scotia. The harbour is formed by shingle beaches, which extend from th 
northern end of Cape Fourchu Island to the main shore, and separate it from th< 
Bay of Fundy. In 1867 it was found that the part of the beach between Cap 
Fourchu and Stony Point was gradually wearing away, and that if this action wa 
not arrested the sea would eventually sweep away the beach and destroy the harboui 

216 



: 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 



The Government of Nova Scotia began the work of protection by the construction of 
200 feet of cribwork at Stony Point. Daring 1873 and '74 the Department com- 
pleted the remaining length of 2,800 feet, to Cape Fourchu, at a cost of $12,103.25, 
and in 1875 $1,000 were expended in building buttresses to stop the movement of the 
shingle. Since then small sums amounting in all to $^,514.51 have been expended 
from time to time in repairs and maintenance. The work is a very necessary one, 
and until the beach forms outside, which action is gradually taking place, it will bo 
exposed to a heavy sea which undermines it and renders constant watching 
necessary. Total expenditure by the Department for protection of works, $15,617.79. 
During 18*76, 18*7*7 and 18*79 the sum of $13,68*7.25 was employed in deepening 
the harbour opposite the town by dredging. 

TUSKET. 

In 1876 $500, and in 1879 $500.64 were expended in blasting and removing a 
number of boulders from "the Sluice" a narrow channel, much used by fishing 
vessels, between Great Tusket Island, Yarmouth County and the mainland. 

JORDAN BAT. 



Jordan Bay, Shelburne County, is on the south-east coast of Nova Scotia and 
lies open to the Atlantic. 

There is no natural shelter from southerly winds for vessels resorting to this 
place to load with lumber, which is cut in considerable quantities on the Jordan 
Eiver which falls into the head of the bay. 

In 1875 a breakwater 550 long was built on the eastern shore about six miles 
from the mouth of the bay. In 1878 a quantity of heavy stone was deposited on the 
seaward side and end to protect the foundation from the scouring action of the 
waves and tidal currents. In the spring of 1879 the outer end for a length of 100 
feet was carried away down to within 2 feet of low water mark, and works are now 
in progress for repairing this damage. The total expenditure up to the 30th of 
June last was $24,746.12. 






LOCKEPORT. 

Lockeport, Shelburne Co., is a small but well sheltered harbour on the north side 
Locke's Island about 12 miles east of Shelburne Harbour. In 1874 and in 18*78 
1,334.85 were expended in deepening the channel in front of the wharves by 
Iredging. 

LITTLE HOPE ISLAND. 

Little Hope Island lies on the south east cost Nova Scotia, about two miles from 
le mainland, and nearly midway between Port Mouton and Port Joli, Queen's Co. 
tt is about 280 feet long by 180 feet wide at high water, and about 650 feet by 300 
feet at low-water, and is exposed to the full sweep of Atlantic storms. The original 
surface soil, which is composed of three feet of peat mixed with small boulders 
werlying hard yellow clay and gravel, had been wasting away rapidly of late years, 
id in 1869 was reduced to an area of about one-fourth of an acre, standing at the 
*th end eight feet and at the south end twelve feet above high water. 

There is a light-house on the island, which was threatened with destruction 
inless the encroachments of the sea were stopped. 

In January, 1871, a contract was made for the construction of a sea wall 285 
feet long, 20 feet wide and 16 feet high on the most exposed sides of the Island. 
This was completed in September, 1872, its total cost being $12,218.44. 

Lying directly in the track of coasting vessels and on a coast where dense fogs 
are prevalent, this island is exceedingly dangerous and its preservation as a site for 
a light house is of the utmost importance. 

217 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10 ) A. 188S f 



Mb 
■to 
Somerville is a small harbour thirteen miles south of Liverpool, Queen's County. 01 
A breakwater for the accommodation and shelter of fishing vessels, was constructed ^ r j 
at this place in 1879 at a cost of $4,990.25. During the past year have tyuii 

been spent in repairing the damage done by southerly storms. 

VO! 

White Point, Queens County, is situated about six miles south-west of LiverpoolBV 
A small breakwater was constructed some years ago by the inhabitants and the! *' 
Provincial Government. In 1878-79 the Department expended $4,000 in building 
an addition to the breakwater, in strengthening and repairing the old part and in 
removing a number of large granite bou!der3 from the area sheltered. 



BROOKLYN. 



lit 

wenty 



Brooklyn, or Herring Cove, is situated on the east side of Liverpool Bay, ane 
about half a mile outside the bar of Liverpool Harbour, Queen's County. 

The bar at the mouth of Liverpool Harbour had, according to the chari 
of 1830, 9 feet over it at low water, but the chart of 1861 shows that it had bjl 
that time shoaled to 4 J feet, probably from the accumulation of sawdust and othei m J 
refuse from the mills on the river. In 1874, 8,800 cubic yards of sand and 9awdus; 
were removed from the bar by the dredge " Canada," and again, in 1877, 4,140 cubi 
yards were removed, increasing the depth to between 6 and 7 feet. The cost o 
dredging was $4,762.38. 

Liverpool Bay, lies open to the Atlantic, with a mouth two miles wide, and ac 
extremely heavy sea is thrown into it by south easterly winds. At such times vessel 
cannot anchor with safety in any part of it, and those which are of too great draugh 
to cross the bar until high water, as well as those driven in by stress of weather, ar< 
obliged to seek refuge in Herring Cove. Between 300 and 400 vessels anchor then 
during the year. Before the construction of the breakwater they were exposed to i 
dangerous ground swell, and in order to improve the shelter the Provincial Govern 
ment built a pier 310 feet long. This was not considered well situated, and when th< 
works came under the charge of the Department the new breakwater was located a 
a point 800 feet more to the south. A length of 434 feet was completed in Sep 
tember, 1873, and an additional length of 300 feet in November, 1874. Besides being 
exposed to a heavy sea, the breakwater is much weakeneJ by the attacks of se 
worms, and it has for some time past been the intention to cover the cribwork wit 
slopes of heavy stone. This was partially carried out in 1881 by the placing of abou 
10,000 cubic yards on the seaward side and end. 

The cost of the works has been $67,812.48. 

Spring tides rise 8 feet and neaps 5 feet. 



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PUDDING PAN ISLAND. 



gfet mi! 

BOH 

a-hal 
fal 



The Pudding Pan is a small island lying about half a mile off the coast, near! 
midway between Ccffin's Island and Medway Head. At low water it is almost coi 
nected with the mainland by rocky reefs and bars. To complete this connection s 
detached breakwater, 875 feet in length, has been constructed on the shoals east o 
the island. This has the effect of sheltering the cove west of the island from south' 
easterly gales, and forms a small harbour of refuge, which, however, is still open t< 
the Atlantic on the south-west. 

The work was done in 1879 at a cost of $5,714.75. 

PORT MED WAY. 

Port Medway, Queen's County, is about ten milea east of Liverpool, and stand 
on the southern side of the bay of the same name, and about three miles from i* 

218 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (Jto.10.) A. 188S- 



mouth. The works at this place were built in 1875-76, and consist of beach protec- 
tion to prevent the sea from breakiDg through into the harbor. The original cost wa» 
j$4,513.50. In 1880 it was found necessary to expend $214.13 in refilling portions of 
the cribwork in which the ballast had settled, making a total expenditure by th© 
jDepartment of $4,728.23. 

vogler's cove. 

Yogler's Cove is on the eastern side of Port Medway Bay. During the past 
year $5,075.53 has been expended in deepening to 10 feet at low water, the channel 
teading to the harbour. 

LITTLE HARBOUR. 

Little Harbour, Lunenburg Co. In October, 1881 $200 was expended in clear 
ing and deepening the channel over the bar for a length of about 600 feet, a width of 
twenty feet, and to a depth at low water of three and a half feet, thus enabling the 
fishing boats to enter the harbour at all times of tide. 

BROAD OOVE. 

Broad Cove, Lunenburg County, is on the south-east coast of Nova Scotia^, 
twenty miles west of Cross Island, at the mouth of Lunenburg Bay. It is open to 
the Atlantic, between south-east and south. A breakwater, 400 feet long, was built, 
in 1876, near its head, in order to give shelter to fishing boats. The cost of the work 
was $3,000. 

LUNENBURG. 






Lunenburg Harbour, at the head of Lunenburg Bay, is about 40 miles west of 
Sambro Light. It is secure and well sheltered and has a depth of from 1J- to 2J 
fathoms at low water. Its length inside a line drawn between Moreau and Battery 
Points is about a mile and its width about half a mile. 

In 1876 and 1877 $10,849.66 was expended in removing an accumulation of mud 
from the channel. 

Lunenburg is, next to Halifax, the principal depot for the fisheries of this coast, 

MAHONE BAY. 

Mahone Bay, Lunenburg County, is on the southeast coast of Nova Scotia. In 
1878-79, $5,958.65 were expended in dredging the channel in front of the town of 
Chester, which stands on the western shore near the head of the Bay. 



TANCOOK ISLAND. 



Great Tancook Island, Lunenburg County, is situated in Mahone Bay, about 
eight miles south of the Town of Chester and ten miles north-east of Cross Island, at 
the mouth of Lunenburg Bay. The Island is two and a-half miles long by one 
and a-half miles greatest breadth, and is inhabited altogether by fishermen. 

In 1873, the sum of $2,000 was expended, together with a similar amount 
anted by the Legislature of Nova Scotia, in constructing a public landing and 
breakwater at West Cove. The pier extends in a south-westwardly direction from the 
shore, for a distance of 200 feet, having a spur at its outer end. For a length of 165 
feet the structure is of cribwork, filled with stone, the remaining lergth and the spur 
being built of piles. At present it affords a very limited amount of shelter to boats 
ind small vessels. 

KETCH HARBOUR, 

Ketch Harbour (probably a corruption of Catch or Kedge Harbour), Halifax 
County, is about three miles east of Cape Sambro, and about the same distance from 
" mbro Island Light. In 1878 the sum of $985.50 was expended in dredging the 
ner bar. 

219 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (jNi/.lO.) A. 1888 



HERRING COVE. 



Herring Gove, Halifax County, on the western side of the entrance to Halifax 
Harbour, is a small boat harbour which in 1875 was improved by dredging. The cost 
of the work was $8,015.05. 



HALIFAX. 



Between 18*75 and 1880 the amount of $3,758.66 was expended in dredging at the 
railway and other wharves in Halifax Harbour. When this was done for privato com- 
panies the cost was refmded by them, the sum thus received amounting to $1,075, 
leaving a balance of $2,683.66 as the expenditure by the Department 



Porter's Lake, Halifax County, is an extensive sheet of water eighteen miles east 
of Halifax. It is nearly seven miles long, with an average width of about half a mile 
and a depth of from ten to twenty feet over the greater part of its area. Its southern 
end is separated from the Atlantic by several Islands connected by beaches of sand 
and shingle, and from Three Fathom Harbour by a high, narrow, rocky ridge of land. 
A proposition was made some years ago to connect the Lake with that harbour b; 
means of a canal and tidal lock, and several surveys and estimates for such awor' 
have been made. The only outlet at present is a narrow and shallow stream running 
into the Atlantic through one of the beaches at the southwest corner of the lake. This 
is impassible even by boats and a small amount ($200) was expended in 1881 in 
attempting, without much success, to improve it so far as to enable boats to enter at 
high water. 



1 



THREE FATHOM HARBOUR. 

Three Fathom Harbour is in Halifax County, about fourteen miles east of the 
-entrance of Halifax Harbour. It is formed by islands and their connecting beaches, 
and though small, is well sheltered from all quarters. In 1879, an outlay of $2,999.94 
was made in constructing protection works to prevent the opening of a breach in one 
of the beaches, already much reduced by the action of the sea, and which would, to a 
great extent, have destroyed the harbour. 

CHEZZETCOOK. 

Chezzetcook, Halifax Co. — In 1874-75, $2,593.70 were expended in deepening 
the channel of Chezzetcook Inlet, about fifteen miles west of Halifax Harbour. 

MUSQUODOBOIT. 

Musquodoboit Inlet is on the south-east coast of Nova Scotia, about twenty-eight 
miles to the eastward of Halifax Harbour, and in the County of Halifax. 

In 1877-78 the amount of $1,831. 10 was expended in the removal of boulders froi 
the bar at its entrance. 

SHERBROOKE. 

The town of Sherbrooke, Guysborough County, stands on the eastern bank of the 
River St. Mary. About half a mile below the town, the channel of the river is ol 
Btructed by a bar of sand and gravel, the least depth over which is 4 feet at extreme 
low water. The removal of this bar to a depth of 8 feet at low water would permit 
small vessels to reach Sherbrooke at all tirnos of tide and would give 13 or 14 feet 
high water, a depth sufficient for a large class of vessels. During 1881-82 the sum oj 
$354.10 has been spent in partially dredging the required channel. 

220 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 188$ 



LARRY RIVER. 

Larry River falls into the western end of Tor Bay, Guysborough County. In 
J1878 $6,546.70 were expended in improving the channel by the removal of 26,230 
ibic yards of mud and boulders. 

CANSO HARBOR. 

Canso Harbor, Guysborough Co., is a place of much historical as well as nauti- 
interest. It was visited by French fishermen and fur traders as early as the 16th 
tury. In 1578, the number of fishing vessels on the coast was 330, of which 150 
were French, 130 Spaniards and Biscayans, and 50 English. During the next two 
hundred years it was the scene of frequent conflicts between the French and British 
colonists .and the Indians, falling alternately under the power of France and England 
until 1759, when the contest was finally terminated. The remains of a large fort 
which commanded the approach from the Atlantic may still be seen on Grassy Island, 

Canso lies at the southern entrance of Chedabucto Bay through which all ves- 
sels entering or leaving the Gulf of St. Lawrence by the Gut of Caneo must pass,, 
and near the point where the general trend of the coast of Nova Scotia changes from 
uth to west. 

It has two entrances — the northern leading. from Chedabucto Bay and the south- 
ern from the Atlantic. There is also a narrow boat channel called the "Tickle" 
between Durell Island and the mainland. Many vessels pass through the harbour in 
niiiE order to avoid going round the dangerous rocks and ledges which lie outside of it. 
It is also much frequented by Canadian and American fishing vessels which run in 
here for shelter or to await a change of wind. The cod and lobster fisheries are fol- 
lowed extensively in the vicinity. 

The harbour is formed by Piscatiqui, George and Grassy Islands on the east, and 
by Durell Island and the mainland on the west. Cutler Island and the ehoals between 
it and Durell Island protect it from the north, and Burying Island and the bar unit- 
ing it with Lanigan Point from the south-east. 

The clay banks of Burying Island have been gradually wasting away until only 
very small portion of it remains above high water. Its destruction would have 
transformed it into a dangerous reef, and have left the harbour exposed to the swell 
from the Atlantic. It became necessary therefore to protect the remains of the 
land by a breakwater. This work was begun in 1880 and finished in 1882. It ia 
290 feet long and formed of strongly framed crib work packed with stone and pro- 
tected on the ends and seaward side by slopes of heavy stone. Its cost has been 
" 000. Spring tides rise 6 J feet, and neaps 4J feet. 

GUYSBOROUGH. 

Guysboro' Harbour at the head of Chedabucto Bay is an extensive inlet running 
hward eight and a half miles to the head of the tide where it is crossed by a bridge, 
jit is navigable for ships up to " The Narrows," four miles from the entrance, and for 
"nail vessels three miles further, while boats can ascend as far as the bridge. The 
trance channel is narrow and crooked, with tides running from four to five knots. 
ere are two bars, the outer with 17 feet at low water, and which is rendered 
passable by breakers in heavy weather, and the inner with 13 feet in a channel only 
50 feet wide. 

In 187778 the sum of $1,413.53 was expended in widening the channel at Stony 
atch Point between the two bars. 

Tides rise 6J feet springs and 3J feet neaps. 

[RAGGED POND. 

Hagged Pond, on the north side of Chedabucto Bay, about six miles east of 
iysborough Harbor, is a triangular sheet of water, with an area of about 180 acres 

221 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10.) A i-525 



;and a depth of from two to five fal horns. It is enclosed by shingle beaches, through 
which there is a narrow channel on the western side of Bagged Head, by which 
boats can enter at high water. 

In 1879 $3,991.43 were spent in widening and deepening this channel, and in 
partially protecting the sides with cribwork and brush. In 1880-81 a further grant! 
of $i,500 was made for the purpose of completing the work, but the result of former 
operations was found to be so unsatisfactory that it was not considered advisable to] 
make any further expenditure. 

Where ponds of this nature exist, the temptation to try and make them avail-1 
able as harbours is very great, especially on a coast where natural harbours are! 
distant from each other ; but it is only under a combination of most favourable cir- 
cumstances that any good results can be obtained, and most attempts to keep open 
navigable channels have ended either in total failure, or at best in very partial] 
success. Total expenditure by the Department, $4,491.43. 

PORPER POND. 

Porper Pond is on the north side of Chedabucto Bay, about 10 miles east of 
Guysborough Harbour. In 1874-75 the Department expended $5,119.09 in opening a 
passsage into the pond in order to provide a harbour for fishing boats. 

_ 

OYSTER POND. 

Oyster Pond, Guysborough County, is one of several large ponds on the noi 
shore of Chedabucto Bay, which form the only boat harbors between Cape Argos, a1 
the entrance of the Gut of Canso, and Guysborough Harbor, a distance of 15 miles. 

Oyster Pond is 12 miles east of Guysborough Light. 

The sum of $2,000 was expended in 1876 in deepening the entrance channol anc 
protecting the tides with cribworb, which was repaired in 1879, making a total ex- 
penditure oi $2,250.01. 

PORT MUL GRAVE. 

Port Mulgrave, Guysborough County, is on the western side of the Gut of Cam 
and is now the terminus of the Eastern Counties Railway. In 1873 the sum o]| 
$782 was expended in deepening the cove by dredging. 

ARICHAT. 

West or Little Arichat, or Acadiaville, is situated on He Madame, inside of Creighj 
ton Island, Richmond County. The approach is from the west over a bar having 17 fee 
at low water. The mouth of the harbour half a mile within this bar is 900 feet wide) 
Formerly the eastern end of the harbour was closed by a beach of shingle 200 feet hi 
width and standing about 15 feet above high water. It is said that the water was 
bold on the inside that the vessels of 500 tons could lie close to the shore and take 
ballast with planks. Probably this removal of the stone assisted in the destruction o^ 
the bar which was completed by a severe storm in July, 1839. Since then th<j 
remains of the bar have been gradually working towards the harbour, until th 
highest part, which is only a few feet above low water, was, in 1870, some 75<' 
or 800 feet west of its former position. South-westerly storms washed sand ancj 
shingle into the channel, which was fast becoming shallow. 

To preserve the harbour it was therefore necessary to replace the former beach b;| 
a breakwater. 

The width of the opening between Cieighton Island and the mainland is 1,285 feeij 
The Government of Nova Scotia, previous to 1867, had constructed a breakwater 58 
feet long, partially cloning the gap. The remaining length was completed by thj 
Dominion Government, in 1879, at a cost of $9,694.29. 

West Arichat Harbour, though of limited size, is easy of access and completelj 
sheltered from all winds. The cod and other fisheries are extensively prosecuted. 

222 



1)46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No.10) A. 188* 



PETITDEGRAT. 

Petitdegrat Inlet lies between Petitdegrat Island and the south-east end of lie 
Lame. It is three rrfiles long and has water enough for large vessels, but the rocks 
numerous and the channel narrow. r ihe fisheries are extensively prosecuted and 
shores are occupied by fishermen. The southern end of the inlet opens on the 
lantic and its northern end is separated from Bocky Bay by a beach of shingle, 
ough which there is a narrow channel passable by boats. The sum of $3,000 has 
m expended in improving the passage so as to enable boats to go through at all 
* of tide. 

d'escousse harbor. 

D'Escousse Harbour, on the north side of He Madame, lies inside of Bernard Island, 

the eastern end of Lennox Passage. The harbour, which is about half a mile long 

one quarter of a mile wide outside the one-fathom lines, has a depth of from 2£ 

3 fathoms over a great part of its area and is well sheltered from all quarters. 

le principal entrance is from the eastward, through a narrow and moderately curved 

lannel. In 1872-3 this channel, which had in some places only 7 J feet at low-water, 

as improved by dredging, at a cost of $2,535.20. There is a narrow passage with 

>nly 2 feet at low-water, leading from the head of the basin into Poulament Bay, 

rhich is itself a secure and capacious harbor. The tides rise from 4 to 6 feet. 

l'ardoise. 



L'Ardoise, Pichniond Co., lies on the eastern side of Chedabucto Bay, about nine 
jniles southeast from St. Peter's Canal. In 1876 $10,330 were expended in con- 
structing a breakwater 400 feet long, the design being to provide shelter for the 
'^hing boats frequenting the Bay. 



GABARUS. 



There is a small boat harbour at the head of Gabarus Bay, Cape Breton County, 
vhich, though of limited area, is of great value to the fishermen. Formerly boats 
ould enter only at high water, there being a depth of but one foot in the channel 
it low water. The sum of $3,175 00 has been expended at different times in deepen- 
ng the channel to 3 feet at low water, equal to 7 feet at ordinary high water. 



MAIN-ADIEU. 



Main-a-Dieu Harbour is a cove of circular shape, near the eastern point of Cape 
Breton Island. It is about one quarter of a mile in diameter and has a depth of from 
to 13 feet at low water. It is open to the south, but is sheltered by Scattarie 
.aland and the reefs in the bay, so that it affords safe anchorage to colliers and fishing 
chooners drawing less than 10 feet of water, and by which it is much frequented as 
harbour of refuge, (rales from the eastward throw in a heavy undertow, or ground 
veil, which would cause vessels of larger draught to strike the ground. To break 
is swell it is proposed to build a breakwater 800 feet long, extending from Burke's 
int on the eastern side of the entrance to " Harbour Bock," which lies nearly in 
e centre of the channel. A length of 180 feet has been built in 1881 and 1882 at a 
t of $8,596.22. 
Tides rise from 5£ to 3 J feet. 



cow BAY. 



Cow Bay, or Morien Bay, is on the eastern coast of Cape Breton Inland, about 
.8 miles south-east of Sydney, and owing to the extensive coal mines in its immediate 
'icinity, is a place of considerable importance. 

223 



46 Victoria Sessional Papers (No.10.) A. 1883 



The bay is 2J miles wide at its mouth and, being completely open to the Atlantic, 
affords no safe anchorage during easterly winds. 

The danger to which vessels were exposed, and the losses from wrecks— from! 
four to six annually — were so serious that the proprietors of the Gowrie Mines] 
Messrs. Archibald & Co., decided upon the construction of a breakwater for the shelter! 
of vessels during storms. In this they were aided by the Nova Scotia Government] 
to the extent of about one-fifth ol the outlay. 

The breakwater is on the north side of the bay, and when first visited by an 
Engineer of the Department, in 1868, was 1,380 feet long, and 50 feet wide, with 2d 
feet of water at the outer end. The area of the basin enclosed between the breakwaten 
and the loading wharf of the mines was fully IT acres, 10 acres of which had a depth! 
from 9 to 20 feet at low water. 

In 18*73-14, $10,004.96 were expended by the Department in strengthening thJ 
breakwater. The work was vigorously prosecuted and was about half completed] 
when, on 24th August, 1873, a disastrous gale occurred which seriously damaged it 
After the storm operations were resumed, the balance of the grant being largely sup 
plemented by Messrs. Archibald & Co. 

By Order of Council, 26th September, 1874, the Messrs. Archibald's interest i 
the breakwater was purchased for $26,000, the Chief Engineer's estimate of th 
amount expended by them being $96,519, and on 14th May, 18*75, a contract wad 
entered into for the repairing and strengthening of the structure for the sum oj 
$4*7,640. This was completed in July, 1877. In November of the same year and in 
the following May gales damaged a portion of the old work. In 1878-79 the 
necessary repairs and some additions were made, among which was a new block 7m 
feet in length. In 1880 a block, 80 feet by 30 feet, was built on the seaward 
side of the outer end, and, in 1881, a new counterfort 40 feet square was added ano 
some repairs made to the face. 

The total expenditure at this place by Department has amounted to $127,444.10 

Owing to its very much exposed position, the breakwater is always liable t| 
severe injury by easterly storms. The ballast from vessels arriving at the port i 
cast over the outside aud is gradually forming a beaoh which will tend to breal 
the force of the waves, but as much of the material is earth or fine sand, the procesj 
is a slow one, though it has been aided by throwing in a quantity of heavy stone 
procured in the vicinity. It is also to be feared that the sea worms are at work oi 
the inner face and that their operations will, in time, be the cause of most seriou 
trouble and expense. 

The wharfage collected by the Department of Marine and Fisheries fr 
vessels discharging ballast at the pier, amounts to nearly $3,000.00 annually. 



i. 

; 



PORT CALEDONIA, 



Port Caledonia or Schooner Pond is on the northeast coast of Cape Bretoj 
Island, and lies about 15 miles east of the entrance to Sydney Harbour. A brand 
of the Cape Breton Kailway runs to this place, and during the past year the Depart 
ment has expended $1,348.20 in deepening the channel into the harbour in order tj 
admit a larger class of the vessels engaged in the coal trade. 



LITTLE GLACE BAY. 



. 



Little Glace Bay, five miles south-east of Lingan,, is a harbour formed by 
space enclosed between two long piers which were built by the coal mining con 
panies. In 1880 and 81-82 the sum of $4,755.56 was expended by the Department i| 
deepening the entrance by dredging. 



LINGAN. 



Lingan, or Bridgeport Harbour, is at the head of Indian Bay, on the north-eai 
coast of Cape Breton Island, about five miles east of Flat Point Light, at the entrant 

224 









1 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



of Sydney Harbour. The pond is nearly a mile square, with a depth of eight feet at 
low and eleven feet at high water. The channel leading into this ba^in was narrow 
and crooked, having a depth of from seven to fifteen feet at low water. 

In 1877 a brush breakwater 1,900 feet in length was constructed on the sand 
beach which separates the harbour from Indian Bay, and through which the sea during 
easterly gales had made several breaches, threatening its entire destruction . 

In 1878, 79 and 80 the channel at the entrance was straightened and deepened 
by dredging, thus admitting vessels of larger draught to load coal from the Lingan 
mines. The total cost of these works has been $13,253.70. 

SYDNEY. 

Sydney Harbour is on the north-east coast of Cape Breton. It is three miles wide 
at the mouth but at five miles within the lighthouse on Flat Point the navigable 
channel contracts to the breadth of half a mile between the two bars of sand and 
shingle which extend from the shore on either side. Inside these bars the harbour 
divides into two arms, the west and the south. The harbour is easy of access and is 
capable of containing any number of the largest vessels in safety. It is closed by ice 
between the end of December and the beginning of May. 

The Town of Sydney stands on the east side of the south arm and is the shipping 
place for several coal mines. In 1878, $10,658.09 was expended by the Department 
in removing 30,100 cubic yards of sand and gravel from a shoal lying off the loading 
pier of the Cape Breton Eailway and Coal Company. In 1881, 24,500 cubic yards 
were removed from the same place, at a cost of $7,122.63. 

North Sydney, distant five and a-half miles, is on the north side of the west 
arm and is also a point of shipment for large quantities of coal. The anchorage is 
sheltered by the North Bar. North-we3terly winds throw a heavy sea upon the bar, and 
wash the sand into the harbour. To stop this encroachment, aud at the same time 
to provide ballast ground, which is much needed, it has been in contemplation to 
build a breakwater on the bar. A portion of the design was carried out last year by 
the expenditure of $2,000 by the Department in conjunction with a like amount 
furnished by the Harbour Commissioners. 

BENACADIE POND. 

Benacadie Pond, Cape Breton County, lies at the south-west angle of the 
peninsula which divides East Bay from the Little Bras d'Or Lake. It is about a 
mile and a-half long, and one-sixth of a mile wide, and has a depth inside of from 
nine to twelve feet. The mouth is obstructed by a bar of sand, and works are now 
in progress for its improvement. Total expenditure by the Department, $716.20. 

BIG POND. 

Big Pond is situated on the south side of the East Bay of Bras d'Or Lake. It is 
a large sheet of water, of good depth, separated from the lake by a beach averaging 
50 feet in width and four feet in height, composed of sand and shingle, with a 
substratum of clay. The Pond would make a harbour suitable for coasting vessels were 
it possible to keep it open. In 1874-75 a cutting was made from the lake into the 
Pond, and the sides protected with crib work, but there being no large streams dis- 
charging into the Pond the slight rise and fall of the lake did not produce sufficient 
scour to keep the opening clear, and it was soon choked. The cost of the works 
was $2,500. 

INDIAN ISLANDS. 

Indian Islands, Cape Breton County, are a group of small islands on the north, 
coast of the East Bay of the Great Bras d' Or Lake. The outer islands are connected 
to the shore by a shingle beach. A cutting through this beach now enables th& 

225 
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4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



fishermen residing at Eskasoni to reach the fishing grounds by a short run in smooth t 
water instead of going round outside the islands as formerly. The cost of opening) 
this channel and protecting the sides with crib work has been $2,196.45. 

INGONISH. 

Ingonish Bay, Victoria County, lies on the north east cost of the Island of Caj 
Breton, midway between Sidney Harbour and Cape North. It is divided into Nortl 
and South Bays by Middle Head, a narrow, rocky and precipitous peninsula moreJ 
than two miles in length. At the head of South Bay there are two ponds, one of 
fresh and the other of salt water, enclosed by shingle beaches, and having commoi 
outlet. Easterly winds throw a heavy sea into the bay and it affords no safe anchor^ 
age. The depth in the entrance to the pond at the head was only 5 feet and boats 
could not enter except at high water. 

In 18*73 works were undertaken by the Department for the purpose of deepening 
the channel to 15 feet at low water, equal to from 18 to 20 feet at high water, widening 
it from 60 feet to 200 feet, and constructing a breakwater TOO feet long for the! 
protection of the new channel. 

This work was completed in 18*76 at a cost of $84,397.20, and the saltwater pondj 
which contains about 400 acres, now affords a safe and commodious harboi 
for fishing and coasting vessels. Since then the sum of $2,306,50 has been expend* 
in maintenance and repairs, making a total expenditure of $86,703.70. 

The mountains in the rear of Ingonish are the highest on this coast, attaining ai 
elevation of 1,390 feet. Smoky Cape (Cap Enfume) the southern point of the baj 
rises precipitously from the sea to the height of 950 feet. The squalls from theg 
high lands are at times very violent. 

CHETICAMP. 

Cheticamp Harbour on the north-west coast of Cape Breton, about mid-waj 
between Capes Mabou and St. Lawrence, lies between Cheticamp Island and the mainj 
land. There is a depth of 20 feet within the harbor, but formerly there was only ' 
feet at low water on the bar at its entrance. This has been increased to 9 feet, equaj 
to 12 feet at high water, by the removal of 54,135 cubic yards of sand and gravel aj 
a cost of $11,731.08. 

Herring, cod and mackerel abound on the coast. The Messrs. Robin & Co., oj 
Jersey, have a large fishing establishment at this place. 

MARGAREE. 

Margaree Harbour, at the mouth of the Margaree River, Inverness County, is oi 
the north-west coast of Cape Breton, about 30 miles north-east of Port Hood. It hai 
a narrow and intricate channel, through which the tides run at the rate of 4 knots 
and its entrance is obstructed by a bar having only 5 feet over it at low and betweei 
7 and 8 feet at high water. The surf on the bar is at times heavy and dangerous. 

Some years before Confederation the Government of Nova Scotia constructef 
piers for the improvement of the entrance, and in 1876 the Department expende( 
$3,000 in repairing and extending these works. In 1879 a further grant of $3,00C 
was employed in building an additional length of 140 feet. Total amount expended) 
$6,000. 

The Margaree River is celebrated for its salmon fishing. 

MABOU. 

Mabou Harbour, Inverness County, is six miles northeast of Port Hood. Tht 
entrance was formerly at the southern end of a range of sand hills. The bar hi 
only four feet over it at low water. From the bar the channel ran east-southeast foil 
about 1200 feet, then turned abruptly to the north, following the inner side of th(J 

226 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



sand hills for about the same distance and then made another sharp turn to the 
southeast for a distance of about 4,000 feet when the channel, to this point not more 
than 150 feet wide and 10 feet deep, expands into a fine basin two and a half miles 
loDg and from one-quarter to one-half a mile wide inside the ten foot lines, and 
having a depth of from two and a half to four fathoms, over a large part of its area. 

In 1870, a survey was made and a report submitted (Departmental Eeport, 
1870, page 63), on the project of opening a new channel by cutting through the sand 
hills at their northern end and closing the existing entrance. 

This work was begun in 1871 and proceeded with, during the following eleven 
years, a sum of ($89,090.57) being expended. 

The original scheme has not as yet been fully carried out. but as far as can be 
judged from present results, the works promise success. The new channel is straight, 
has a fair depth of water and is in every way a great improvement on the former 
entrance which is now entirely closed by a sand beach, 800 or 900 feet in width. 

During the past year, 88,765.19 have been expended in partially opening a chan- 
nel through a reef of hard clay and stone which lies outside the new entrance. 

PORT HOOD. 

Port Hood, gaid by Admiral Bayfield to be " the only safe anchorage on the west 

coast of Cape Breton, north of the Gut of Canso." from which it is distant about 

twenty miles, was formerly a very secure harbour. Smith's Island, which is two miles 

long, forms its western side, and was then connected at the northern end with the 

mainland by a range of high sand hills between 3,000 to 4,000 feet lon^. In July, 

1839, a heavy gale from the north made a breach in this protection. The opening 

was at first very narrow, and might perhaps have been closed, but it was 

neglected, and the tidal currents, aided by the fishermen who found it a 

convenient passage, enlarged it with increasing rapidity until the sand hills were 

entirely swept away and their site is now covered by fifteen feet of water. The 

i harbour is unsafe during north-easterly winds, except in the small bay near Smith's 

| Island, and this only remaining shelter appears in some danger of destruction by 

the cutting of the sea through tne narrow ridge of soft sandstone which protects it on 

jthe north. 

A pier, 550 feet long with an L 100 feet by 25 feet, was built on the eastern shore 
of the harbour in 1865 or 1866 by the Provincial Government. When first taken in 
charge by the Department it was in want of repairs. In November, 1871, a portion 
200 feet in length was destroyed by a storm. During the two following seasons this 
part was rebuilt, other necessary repairs made and a new block, 125 feet by 25 feet, 
built at the outer end. The cost of these works was $15,505.00. 

In 1877-78-79 $1,892.07 were expended in keeping the pier in repair. In 
October, 1879, in August, 1880 and again in November, 1881, gales severely injured 
the work. During all this time repairs were in progress, the expendituie amounting 
to $4,000, making a total outlay by the Department of $21,397.07. 

The pier stands exposed to the full force of north easterly storms which are very 
violent on this coast, the trend of the shore, north of Cape Linzee, to the eastward, 
leaving it open to the whole length of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The timber below 
water is so much weakened by the teredo navalis or shipworm that it is almost useless 
to attempt further repairs. A plan for the complete reconstruction of the pier and its 
protection from both sea and worms by slopes of heavy stone is under consideration. 



HAVRE BOUCHE. 

Havre Boucbe', Antigonish County, is a small harbour on the south shore of St. 
George's Bay, between Cape Jack and the northern entrance of the Gut of Canso. 
mouth is narrow and had formerly only four feet at low water with a rise of tide 
from two to four feet. It has no bar outside and a depth of inside of 13 or 14 feet. 
In 1877-78 the sum of '$2,498.48 was expended in deepening and widening the 
channel at the entrance. It now forms a convenient place of reluge for small vessels 
waiting for a leading wind through the Straits of Canso. 

227 
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4G Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) . A. 1883 



TRACADIE. 

Big Tracadie Harbour, Antigonish County, is situated on the southern shore of St. 
George's Bay, about four miles HJ.S.E. from Pomquet Island. It is an extensive sheet 
of water from 10 to 14 feet deep over a large part of its area. The entrance was 
formerly at the west end of Delory Island which lies across its mouth. The channel 
was narrow and crooked and was obstructed by a dangerous bar of gravel and stones 
with only 2 feet on it at low water. It was therefore accessible only by boats or very 
small vessels at high water when the depth was from 4 to 6 feet. 

In 1863 the Provincial Government opened a passage into the harbour at the eastj 
end of Delory Island, about a mile and a quarter from the old mouth, by cutting 
through the spit which connected the Island with the mainland and constructing a 
breakwater 60 feet square on its eastern side. An examination made in 1870 showed! 
8 feet in the new channel at low water. 

In 1874 and 1875 the Department expended $12,690.67 in re-building and extend-l 
ingthe breakwater and in the construction of a breastwork to protect the western side 
of the channel from the action of the tidal currents. In 1877 $873.70 were spent in) 
repairing damage done by a gale, and in 1878 $675.26 in dredging a sand-bar whichE 
had formed outside the mouth. The harbour is a safe and commodious one for the clasal 
of vessels generally used in the shore fisheries and the smaller coasting craft. Total! 
expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $13,564.37. 

BAYFIELD. 

Antigonish County, on the south-west of St. George's Bay, is distant 17 miles 
south from Cape George. The harbour is formed by Pomquet Island anc 
the outlying reefs. Pomquet Island is about three quarters of a mile loi 
and is separated from Pomquet Point on the mainland by a strait 1,85( 
feet wide at high water. At low water the reefs dry out from the island an( 
the point, leaving a passage 400 feet wide, with only 4 feet of water in it. Th( 
closing of this opening would complete the shelter of the roadstead from all point 
except between north-east and east. The tides rise from 2 to 4 feet. 

In 1879 a portion of the proposed breakwater, 400 feet in length, was built at 
cost of $4,888.28. 

ANTIGONISH. 

Antigonish Harbour, on the west coast of St. George's Bay, 13 miles sou 
south-west of Cape George, runs inland seven miles, the channel having in som< 
places a depth of five or six fathoms, though it is shoal at the upper end. Th 
entrance is obstructed by a bar of sand, on which there is only six feet at low wat ei 
with a rise of tide of from 3 to 4 feet. 

The surrounding country is fertile and thickly settled. Large shipments 
cattle, sheep and farm produce are made annually to Newfoundland. 

The Department has expended $3,649.15 in deepening the upper reach of th 
harbour by dredging. 

mc nair's cove. • 

McNair's Cove, or more properly, Ballantyne's Cove, Antigonish County, 
about five miles south-west of Cape George. It is open to St. George's Bay, betwee 
south-east and south-west. It is sheltered by Cape George from north-easterl 
winds, but these if of long duration throw in a heavy ground swell. The Cove 
resorted to a good deal during the fall months by fishing boats and small vessels seekin 
shelter from storms. 

In 1872 a contract was made for the construction of a breakwater 400 feet long 
extending from the northern point of the Cove, in order to break the underto 
during north-easterly gales. This work was completed in November, 1873 

228 



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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



1875, the pier which had settled into the soft bottom, was built up to its proper 
height. In 1878 a new block was placed at the outer end, and some repairs made to 
the older parts of the work. 

The total expenditure at this placo has been $33, 127.45. 

ARISAIG. 

The breakwater at Arisaig, Antigonish County, was an old and somewhat 
dilapidated structure, when it came under the charge of the Department, in 1870. It 
was put into thorough repair in 1873, at a cost of $2,583, and during the past two 
years $300 more have been expended in repairing damage done by the ice to which it 
is much exposed. 

The pier is about 350 feet in length, and the work would be of little importance 
were it not that there is no other place of refuge for fishing boats between Cape 
George and Merigomish, a distance of 31 miles. Arisaig is midway between these 
points, and affords shelter from easterly winds, but none from winds between north 
and west. The cove was capable, at some expense, of being made a safe harbour of 
refuge, but the present works, built before Confederation, are not very judiciously 
located . 

MERIG03IISH. 

Merigomish Harbour, Pictou County, is between nine and ten miles south-east of 
Pietou Light. It has 14 feet at low water over its bar, and a sufficient depth inside 
for vessels of large tonnage, but the entrance is difficult and intricate. The harbor 
is of great extent, running five or six miles to the eastward, and four miles to the 
westward of the mouth. The bay is full of islands, coves and headlands,, which with 
the background of mountains rising 800 or 900 feet above the sea, form scenery of 
great beauty. Before the timber was exhausted this harbor was frequented by 
shipping, but is now seldom visited by anything larger than a coasting schooner. 

In 1880 a wharf, 150 feet long, was built in the cove east of Hardwood Point for 
the purpose of facilitating the shipment of farm produce, etc. 

The cost of this work was $1,065.60. 

NEW GLASGOW. 

The town of New Glasgow is situated on the East River, one of the arms of the 
Pictou River, seven and a half miles above the town of Pictou. Owing to its proximity 
to the coal mines, it is a place of considerable trade. It is also the junction between the 
Pictou branch of the Intercolonial Railway and the Eastern Counties Railway. 
Large ships are built here and taken down the river, at high water. About two mil- 
lions feet of lumber are cut annually in the mills. In 1880-81-82, the Department 
expended $5,705.09 in deepening the channel in front of the town by dredging. 

PICTOU. 

Pictou Harbour is pronounced by Admiral Bayfield to be in every respect the 
finest on the southern shore ofthe Gulf eastward of Gaspe. It is situated at the head 
of a bay which is If miles wide and 1J miles deep. The mouth of the harbour is 
about one-quarter of a mile wide, and there is a depth of from 30 to 40 feet in the chan- 
nel as far as the town, which stands on the north side two miles from the light house. 
The flats, however, extend some distance beyond the ends of the wharves. On the 
south side is the terminus of the Pictou Branch of the Intercolonial Railway, the 
priucipai point of connection between Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. 

Opposite the town the harbour divides into three large arms called the East, 
Middle and West Rivers. The last two may be navigated without much difficulty 
for two or three miles above their confluence, but higher up they become divided 
into several. small channels obstructed by oyster beds. 

229 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



The West River runs through a beautiful and well cultivated valley containing 
a large population. The East River is navigable by large vessels for a distance of 
three miles from Pictou, to the loading place of* the Albion Mines. The channel 
has an average width of 550 feet. Half a mile below the loading place is a bar with 
12 feet least water, and a short distance above, the channel is obstructed by old oyster 
beds. Since 1873 the Department has expended $19,559.53 in improving the 
East Eiver, $996.39 in Middle River, and $18,116.23 in deepening the water at the 
railway wharves and the loading piers of the several coal mines, 

PICTOU ISLAND. 

Pictou Island, in the Straits of Northumberland, and about 10 miles north east 
of Pictou light, is five miles long by one and a half wide. It rises in the central 
part to a height of 150 feet above the sea. There are twenty-five families living on 
the Island who support themselves by fishing and farming. 

A small pier 150 feet long was built near the west end by the Provincial Gov- 
ernment to serve as a landing place for boats. This structure, having been muclk 
damaged by the sea und ice, was repaired and strengthened by the Department in 
1880 at a cost of $745.49. 

RIVER JOHN. 

The River John, Pictou County, falls into John Bay, four miles southeast of 
Cape John. It formerly had only 1 foot at low water over its bar of sand, and an 
irregular depth of from 3 to 11 feet in a very narrow channel up to the bridge, a 
distance of about a mile. 

In 1878 operations were begun for improving the channel and have been con- 
tinued annually since. Up to the 30th June last 78,337 cubic yards of mud and sand| 
had been removed at a cost of $18,614.02. 

There are flourishing settlements on both sides of the river and several ship-yards ] 
and saw mills* 

TATAMAGOUCHE. 

During the summer of 1881, $3,323.79 were expended in dredging the Tatama-j 
gouche River, Colchester County. The work do*ne consisted in opening a channel 
through the flats up to Patterson's wharf, and in deepening and otherwise improving 
the western branch of the river as far as Campbell's mills. In 1882, $2,095.05 were| 
expended in dredging a channel through the bar at its mouth. 

WALLACE. 

In 1879 and 1880 89,908.28 were expended in deepening and otherwise improving! 
the channel of the Wallace River, Cumberland County. 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 



CAMPOBELLO. 

The Island of Campobello, which is about 8 miles long, with an average width 
of about two miles, lies at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy. In 1874, the sum ;of 
$1,000 was appropriated by Parliament for the construction of a breakwater, at 
Wilson's Beach on the north-west side of the Island, with the understanding that 
the local authorities were to furnish a like amount. Owing to a failure on the part) 
of the latter to keep their agreement, the work was left unfinished. .In 1876, &n\ 

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46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 18S3 



amount of &600 00. was expended by the Department in conjunction with a grant 
from the Provincial Legislature, and, in 1878, the work was completed and a connec- 
tion made with the shore in order to shut out the sea from the north. The total 
expenditure by the Department has been $2,807.11. 
The tides rise here from 18 to 22 feet. 

DIPPER HARBOUR. 

Dipper Harbour, St. John County, is about 21 miles west of Partridge Island, at 
the mouth of St. John Harbour, and on the eastern side of Point Lepreau. In 1874, 
A breakwater, 450 feet long, was built on its western shore. The structure was much 
damaged by a destructive gale which visited the Bay of Fundy in the winter of the 
game year. The total expenditure has been $22,244.52. 

ST. JOHN HARBOR. 

St. John Harbor, the estuary of the Eiver St. John, is on the north side of the 
Bay of Fundy. 

The distance between Red Head and Negrotown Point, on the eastern and 
western sides of the mouth respectively, is two miles. Partridge Island, which lies a- 
little more than half a mile outside a line drawn between those Points, divides the 
entrance of the harbor into two channels, the eastern about 9,500 feet wide, and the 
western 3,250 feet wide. 

With south-easterly winds, the sea is broken by Inner Mispeck Point, which 
bears south by-west, two miles from Red Head, and south-east-by-south, the same 
distance from Partridge Island, and by the shoal water, between Red Head and the 
main channel. South-westerly winds threw in a heavy sea through the wester** 
channel, which rendered it difficult for vessels to enter the harbor as tbey were in 
danger of being driven on to the •• foul ground,'' on the eastern side of the channel. 
During 1874 and 1875, a thorough survey of the harbor, with close and accurate 
soundings, was made by the Engineers of the Department. In the spring of 1875, a 
breakwater, 2,250 feet long, to partially clot-e the western channel, was begun, and 
in September, 1877, completod. During the two years following, the breakwater 
was subjected to severe tests, especially by the gales in November, 1877 I'ecember, 
1878, and January, 1879, with no other result than such settlement and consolidation, 
of the stone slopes as had been anticipated. This subsidence cf the stone exposed the 
cribwork in the heart of the structure, and whiie preparations were in progress for 
raising the slopes as soon as the season would permit, a violent storm, on the 11th 
and 12th February, 1879, carried away 1,300 feet of the wooden top, down to from 
two to fonr feet below high water mark. Temporary repairs were made in 1&79, 1880- 
and 1881 in order to prevent further damage. The cost for construction, repairs and 
maintenance has been $256,150.99. In October last, a contract was made for the 
re-building of the top with heavy stone, and the construction of a circular stone pier, 
for a lighthouse at the outer end. This work is now in progress. 

In 187^-3, $4,251.50 were expended in dredging the Ferry Slip on the eastern 
side, and Navy Island Bar on the western side of the harbour. Last summer, $2,754.17 
were spent in improving the channel leading to the Ferry Slip on the western side. 
From 1876 to 1880 a dredge was employed in deepening the water at the new ter- 
minus of the Intercolonial Railway. The amount expended was 832,888.51, of which 
the Railway refunded $31,412.02. 

MADAWASKA. 

The River Madawaska rises in Lake Temiscouata, and falls into the river St. 
John, at Little Falls, now called Edmundston. In 1870, a survey was made of the river, 
with a view to the improvement of the navigation, and a Report and estimates sub- 
mitted. (Departmental Report, 1871, Appendix No. 18.) During tbe past year 
$1,037 06 has been expended in improving and repairing the tow-paths and bridges 
along the banks between Edmundston and Lake Temiscouata. 

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40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 1 



TOBIQUE. 

The River Tobiquo is the largest of the tributaries of the St. John, into whi< 
river it falls from the east, about 20 miles below Grand Falls. About 80 miles above; 
the confluence it is divided into four branches, the southern of which approach i 
within a mile of the sources of the Mirimachi ; while the northern are interlacedjkj 
with the tributaries of the Upsalquitch and Nipisiguit. About a mile from itsjlt 
mouth, there is a rapid called the " Narrows." At this place, the river passes betweenjli 
perpendicular cliffs from 50 to 100 feet in height. Through this chasm, which is a^ 
mile long and only about 150 feet wide, the water rushes with great violence, render4L 
ins: the pass unnavigable during freshets. For 10 miles above, or as far as the 
" Red Rapids," which are caused by a rocky ledge, the water runs with a moderate 
velocity ; 20 miles further up, a tributary called the Wapskehegan, which isK 
navigable for canoes *^0 miles, flows in from the south ; 10 miles above the, 
Wapskehegan, there is a peculiar bend in the river known as the Oxbow, and 3 miles) » . 
above that it receives another large tributary called the Gulquac, which is navigable}!} 
for canoes 25 miles. The Tobiquo itself can be navigated by tow-boats and canoe™ 
for 100 miles from its mouth. Between its head waters and those of the Nipisiguitifc 
there is a portage 2 miles in length. 

In 1880 and 1881, the Department expendod $2,000 in improving the navigatioc 
by blasting and removing ledge rock and boulders from " the Narrows," " the Eed 
Rapids," " the Oxbow," the mouth of the Gulquac, and some minor places. 

FREDERICTON. 

Fredericton, the capital of New Brunswick, stands on the western bank of th<i 
Kiver St. John, about 80 miles above its mouth. Here the Fredericton branch oil 
the St. John and Maine Bailway has its terminus, which is connected with that oJ 
the New Brunswick Railway, on the east side of the river, by a ferry. During 
18*74, 18*75 and 1876 the Department expended $*7,699.15 in deepening the water ii 
front of the public wharves by dredging. 

oromooto. • 

(See Biver Saint John). 

SAINT JOHN RIVER; 

The Saint John, the largest River in the Maritime Provinces, was disco 
•ered by De Monts, on 24th June, 1604. It takes its rise in the State of Main 
near the sources of the Penobscot and Connecticut Rivers, and falls into the Bay 
Fundy, at the City of Saint John, after traversing a distance of about 500 miles. Th 
navigation may be divided into three sections. The first, seventy-five miles in length) 
between the mouth of the St. Francis, where the river first touches British territory* 
and the Grand Falls, to within two miles of which latter point it forms the boundary 
line between Maine and New Brunswick. The second, 140 miles in length, betweeii 
Grand Falls and Fredericton and ; and the third, 80 miles in length, between Fredeij 
icton and St. John. The influence of the tide is felt as far as Chapel Bar, ninetj 
miles from the mouth of the river. 

The first section is now navigated only by tow boats, though for two or threl 
years, about 184^ to 1849, a small steamer called the "Madawaska" plied occasionally 
between Grand Falls and St. Francis. 

The second section is navigable by stern wheel steamers during high water ii 
the spring and autumn, and by tow-boats at all times when it is open. Therapiditj 
of the current prevents the employment of sailing vessels beyond Springhill, si:| 
miles above Fredericton. The third section is navigable by steamers and sailing 
vessels, except when closed by ice. 

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Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



. . 

A description of the river, between Edmundston, forty-five miles above Grand 
Falls, and Fredericton, and the obstructions existing in 1870, will be found in the 
Departmental Beport of 1871, appendix No. 18. 

As early as 1826, the attention of the Legislature of New Brunswick was drawn, 
to the necessity of improving the navigation above Fredericton, and up to the time of 
Confederation between $75,000 and $80,000 had been expended for that purpose. 

In 1872, the Department repaired the tow paths both above and below the Grand 
Falls. 

In 1873 a number of large boulders were removed from the "hannel at various 
points between Andover, two miles below the confluence of the T ique, and Freder- 
ictown, a distance of 118 miles. In 1874 similar operations were v- ..rried on over the 
whole distance, between Grand Falls snd Fredericton. In 1875, the work was 
mined chiefly to the improvement of the Meductic Rapids. In 1880-81, the 
aounts appropriated were expended between the mouth of the .Riviere des Chutes, 
eleven miles below Andover, and Bear Island, about 30 miles above Fredericton. 
In the same year, $1999.12 were spent between St. Francis and Grand Falls in repair- 
ing the towpaths, removing obstructions and building a wing-dam near Edmundton. 
The result of the operations between Andover and Frederickton is said to be 
equal to a gain of from 10 to 15 inches in the depth of the water. The amount 
expended by the Department in these improvements has been $33,439.45, including 
mall sums paid annually for the removal of " snags " from the shoaler parts of the 
ver below Fredericton. 

The Oromocto shoals are situated about ten miles below Fredericton. They 
,ve always been a serious impediment to the navigation of the river, and prior to 
nfederation, the Provincial Government had expended large sums in attempting, 
ithout permanent results, to open a channel by dredging. In 1873-75-77, the 
Department employed $16,918.10 in making a cut through the shoal over a mile in 
length. 

The river at this place is divided into three channels by Oromocto and Thatch 
lands, the navigable channel being between the two islands. It has been recom- 
ended to close the openings to the east of Oromocto and west of Thatch Island by 
tms which would act only when the water has fallen to ordinary summer level, thus 
rcing the whole volume to pass down the central channel with a slightly accelerated 
elocity which would carry matter held in suspension past the shoals. The struc- 
tures being deeply submerged during freshets, would not be exposed to injury by ice 
or floating timber. 

In December, 1877, a contract was made for the construction of a dam 1,600 feet 

iu length, extending from the western shore towards the head of Thatch Island. This 

was finished in August, 1879. In the autumn of 1879, $4,591.64 were expended in 

"redging. In 1880-81, an addition of 600 feet was made to the dam, thus completely 

losing the channel west of Thatch Island. During the past summer, $ 1, 161.38 were 

pended in dredging. 

The result of the operations, as shown by soundings taken in January last, is 
r the whole satisfactory, showing a channol with 9 feet at lowest water ftom the 
id of the shoal down nearly to the foot of Thatch Island, where the depth decreases 
8 feet. This is a gain of 2 feet in depth over nearly the whole distance. It will, 
wever, require another season to determine the full effects of the work, and to 
cide what further steps, if any, are necessary. 

The cost of the sheer dam has been $13,559.56. Total expenditure by the 
partment since Confederation, $48,118.77. 



GRAND LAKE. 

Grand Lake, in Queen's County, is thirty miles long, and from three to six in 

readth. Its outlet into the River Saint John, called the Jems eg, is about thirty 

tiles below Fredericton. Salmon River, which falls into the head of the lake, is a 

;ood sized stream rising in the same highlands as the Richibucto River, which flows 

233 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In 1875 and 1816, the Department expended $6,375,441 
in dredging "Beard's Bar," which obstructed the mouth of the stream. 

The Jemseg is a narrow, deep channel about three miles in length. In 1874 and) 
1815, $10,256.88 were expended in straightening the entrance by dredging out 45,720f 
cubic yards of tough clay and mud. 

Coal mining is carried on to a limited extent a f various points in the vicinity oi 
%he lake. The coal finds a market chiefly in St. John and Fredericton. 

WASHEDEMOAK. 

Washedemoak Lake is merely an expansion of the Eiver of the same name which 
flows into the St. John, thirty-six miles below Fredericton. The WashedemoaK 
Eiver, has a course of between sixty and seventy miles, rising in the same highlands 
as the Rivers Cocagne and Buetouche, which fall into the Straits of Northumberlandi 

The lake is navigable for steamers for a distance of about twenty-five miles from 
its outlet. 

During 1878 and 1879 $6,340.83 were expended in improving the channel at J 
place called " Perry's Flats." 

BLACK RIVER. 

Black Eiver, St. John County, is on the north side of the Bay of Fundy, aboufl 
12 miles east of the entrance to St. John Harbour. In 1879, the sum of $3,907.4(1 
was expended in the construction of a breakwater, 160 feet injength, near the moutl 
of the stream, in order to provide shelter for coasting and other vessels frequentiDdi 
the Bay. 

TYNEMOUTH CREEK. 

Tynemouth Creek, St.f John County, is situated on the north coast of the Bay oh 
Fundy, about 21 miles east of St. John Harbor. In 1875, the sum of $2,5u0 wa 
expended by the Department in the construction of a small block of cribwork fo:|j 
the purpose of facilitating the entry, into the inner harbor, of vessels seeking refug- \ 
from storms. 

QUACO. 

Quaco Bay is on the north coast of the Bay of Fundy, about thirty miles east 
the Harbor of St. John. 

The shore is in the form of a semi-circle, open to the south-east, the distance froi 
Quaco Head to Maccumber Point being little less than two miles, and the depth 
the bay from a line drawn between these headlands about one mile. The sounding] 
within this area give from 5 to 9 fathoms at low water, and the western side of th 
bay affords good anchorage and fair shelter with south-westerly winds. 

The Harbour proper, which lies on the north-eastern side of the Bay, is a basi 
at the mouth of a small river, surrounded on all sides, except the south-east, b; 
lofty cliffs of conglomerate rock, and having an area of about 15 acres. Th 
entrance is exposed between east-south-east, and south-south-west. Spring tides ris 
30 feet, and neaps 25 feet. At oid nary high water, the depth, at the mouth of th 
harbour, is 18 feet, and at the bridge about a quarter of a mile inside 12 feet. A 
about two thirds ebb, the mouth of the harbour dries and at low water the beac 
extends nearly a quarter of a mile outside. 

Two breakwaters, the one on the eastern point 185 feet long, and the other, 
the western point, 100 feet long, wore built by the Provincial Government, butth 
were tota% destroyed by successive storms in 1864 and '65. In 1873, the Depa 
ment constructed a breakwater 300 feet long, on the eastern point, at a cost 
$18,877.84. In December 1881 a contract was made for the erection of a breakw 
of the same length, on the western side of the entrance. 

234 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



These works will render the harbour a safe place of refuge accessible for coasting 
ressels of the ordinary size, between four hours flood and two hours ebb tide. 

The north shore of the Bay of Fundy, between St. John and Shepody, a distance 
)f about 110 miles, is without a natural harbour in which vessels can seek shelter at 
water. Since their improvement by the Department, Black River 12 miles, 
ico 30 miles, and Herring Cove 65 miles from St. John, afford refuge to very 
lall -vessels after half flood. 
The town of St. Martin's, on the shore of Quaco Bay, is the terminus of the 
St. Martin's and Upham Railway, a branch of the Intercolonial. Total expenditure 
the Department since Confederation, $20,846.52. 

HERRING COVE. 

Herring Cove, Albert County, lies on the north shore of Chignecto Bay, the 

)rth-eastern arm of the Bay of Fundy. It is about eleven and a-half miles west of 

ipe Enrage, and about thirty-five miles east of Quaco Light. 

The Cove is sheltered on the south-west side by a cliff of sandstone extending 580 

jt beyond high water mark. From the end of this cape, a reef runs out 250 feet to 
water mark, and at 210 feet further there is a depth of two fathoms at low water. 

ie Cove is dry at low water, and then affords no natural shelter for vessels. 
In 1873, the Department built a breakwater 215 feet in length on the reef, and 

is a small harbour with a depth of from five to ten feet at low water is formed. 

)ring tides rise thirty-seven feet, and neaps thirty feet. The cost of the work has 

m $13,113.45. 
Copper ore, some of which is very rich, is found in abundance in the neighbour- 
district, but has not been much worked of late years. 

ROCHER BAY. 

Rocher Bay, Albert County, is on the east side of Salisbury, Cove which lies be- 
jen Cape Enrage and Herring Head, on the north side of Chignecto Channel. In 
'879-80, $3,130 were expended in the construction of a block of cribwood 100 feet in 
igth as part of a proposed breakwater for the protection of vessels. 

HILLSBOROUGH. 

Hilllsborough, Albert County, is situated on the west bank of the River 
5 etitcodiac, about 14 miles below Moncton. The Albert mines, which produce the 
luable mineral known as "Albertite," are in the vicinity. Gypsum is abundant and is 
•xtensively worked. The Hillsborough mills, which have been in operation since 
861, manufacture large quantities both for agricultural purposes and for plaster. 
The productive capacity of the mills is about 600 barrels per day. In 1874, the 
department constructed a small breakwater, 13Q feet in length, at the mouth of the 
lillflborough River, to protect vessels from the current of the Petitcodiac. The cost 
'fthe work was $3,000. 

STONY CREEK. 

Stony Creek is on the west bank of the Petitcodiac River, 8 miles below Moncton. 
ie object of the works at this place was to deflect the current, and to close a 
\xme\ which had been gullied out between the western shore and a ledge of rock, 
rhich lies in the bed of the river, and which was, by the set of the current through 
'ie gully, rendered extremely dangerous to vessels, etc. The structure, which is 300 
3t in length, was placed under contract in November, 1872, and completed in 
November of the following year, at a cost of $12,436. The results have been quite 
itisfactory . 

235 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188SJ 



SACKVILLE. 

The town of Sackville, Westmorland County, one of the principal stations on th< 
Intercolonial Railway, is situated on the Tintamarre River and on the western margii 
of the Great Tintamarre marsh, a body of alluvial soil containing upwards of 25,00( 
acres, about 5,000 of which are cultivated. 

The river is very crooked and at a place called the "Ram Pasture," a short dig 
tance below the town, two of the bends approach within one hundred feet of each) 
other. As the water, at spring tides, washed over the intervening neck, it appearec 
probable that at no distant time, the river would cut through, and thus be divertec 
quite away from the wharves, which are connected with the railway by a branch lint 
and which would in consequence be rendered useless. 

In 1875, $900 were expended in building a brush breastwork 660 feet in lengthj 
which in 1880 was raised five feet, lengthened 265 feet, and connected at its westen 
end with the dyke surrounding the " Ram Pasture " by a dyke 600 feet in length,: 
The cost of this was $750. To complete the protection, a dyke about 1,200 feet long 
to connect the eastern end with the Au Lac dyke (so called), is requisite. 

In 1879, $400 were expended in removing a number of large boulders and loos 
stones from a portion of the beach, opposite the wharves, in order to permit vessel 
to ground without injury during low water, at which time the harbor is dry. Tot* 
expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $2,0^0.00. 

point!: du chene. 

Pointe du Chene is on the south-east side of the entrance to Shediac Harbo 
and is the eastern terminus of the New Brunswick Division of the Intercolonial 
Railway. The Railway Pier is 1,860 feet long, and was formerly exposed to a heavl 
sea during north-easterly gales, by which it was frequently injured. In 1875 a detachej 
breakwater, 600 feet in length, was built by the Department to protect the pier, at 
cost of $14,583.24. 

In 1879-80, owing to representations made by the Harbour master and oth 
interested in the port, that the old ballast wharf was filled up, and that i 
consequence there was no proper place of deposit for ballast, the Department built 
wharf connecting the outer ends of the railway pier and breakwater, against whi 
vessels can lie and discharge their ballast on the inner side. At the same time, th 
breakwater was strengthened by sheet piling, the cost of the whole being $6,916.74 
During a gale on the 21st October, 1879, the sea rose 7 feet higher than the higher 
spring tides known, submerging the breakwater and pier from end to end, an 
stripping off the top from about 1,000 feet of that part of the latter which wa 
unprotected by the breakwater. In 1881 a contract was made for the constructio 
of an extension, shoreward, of the breakwater, 600 feet in length. This work hai 
been completed at a cost of $15,000, and the pier is now effectually protected. 

In June 1875, $796.94 were expended in dredging the slip at the railway whar 
Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $32,572.37. 



COCAGNE. 






The Harbour of Cocagne, Kent County, is on the south-west coast of the Straij 
of Northumberland, about 10 miles north of Shediac. The entrance is obstructalu 
by a bar of sand and gravel, the channel over which is narrow and crooked with 
4epth of 10 feet at low and 14 feet at high water, ordinary spring tides. 

During the past summer $786.90 have been expended in improving this chann 
by dredging. 

Inside the bar there is anchorage in from 2£ to 4 fathoms water in a narrc 
basin three-quarters of a mile long. 

Further in, the bay, which is a parallellogram 21 by 3f miles, is shallo 
having from 8 to 10 feet at high and only from 4 to 6 feet at low water. Tj 

236 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10,) A. 1833 



Cocagne Eiver enters the south-west angle, and at its mouth there is a pool about 
half a mile long and between 500 and 600 feet wide, where vessels may lie in from 
10 to 14 feet at low water. During 1881-82 the Department has constructed a quay 
400 feet long on the northern side of this pool, for the purpose of providing a ship- 
ping place for the products of the surrounding country. Expenditure, $941.76. 

BUCTOUCHE. 

Buctouche Harbour, Kent County, is situated on the southwest shore of the Straits 
of Northumberland, 16 miles north of Shediac. During 1881 and 1882, the Depart- 
ment has expended #4,934.24 in dredging a passage through some large mussel beds 
which obstructed the navigation, and in widening the channel by the removal of an 
old wreck. 

RICHIBUCTO. 

Kichibucto Harbour is on the south-west shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, 
about 40 miles north of Shediac. The entrance is obstructed by an extremely dan- 
rous bar of sand, which extends for two miles east-south-east from the north 
ach and the channel through which is constantly changing. 

The works proposed for the improvement of the harbour were the construction 
of two breakwaters, one, to extend from the southern point of the north beach, is in 
a south- eastwardly direction for a distance of 1,200 feet, and the other to run out 
north- eastward ly from the south beach, a distance of 1,500 feet, the object being to 
confine the outflowing waters into one permanent channel, and to carry them through 
the bar. 

In February, 1873, a contract was made for the construction of 320 feet in 
length of .the north breakwater, and this was, notwithstanding damage by storms to 
which it was much exposed, completed in September, 1874. In December, 1874, a 
contract was made for the completion of the structure by the building of the 
remaining 880 feet, and the work was finished in the following September. 

In 1876 it was found that the sea, during easterly storms, ran along the south 
side of the breakwater and that there was danger of its cutting through the beach at 
the inner end. It therefore' became necessary to carry protective works some 
distance to the westward. In 1880-81-82, this work was extended as the encroach- 
ments of the sea'advanced, and a further length of between 300 and 400 feet wi'l still 
be required to reach the point where the beach curves away northwards and is no . 
longer exposed. The total expenditure for construction and maintenance has been 
$38,447.20. 

In August, 1873, dredging operations were commenced on the bar and continued 
during 1874-75-77-78 in which time 47,735 cubic yards of sand had been removed at 
a cost of $14,299.59. From 1871 to 1875, while the works for the improvement of 
the Entrance were in progress, $13,000 were expended in Tug Service. 

MIRAMICHI. 

The Miramichi is the second river of the Province in extent and importance. Its 
branches, which are very numerous, drain a vast extent of wilderness country, and, 
uniting as they approach the sea, form a stream of considerable magnitude. Some 
of the southwestern branches approach the St. John and almost touch the ISTashwaak, 
others reach the lands of the Lower Tobique, while three of the north-western branches 
spring from a chain of lakes not far from the sources of the Tobique and Nipisiguit. 

Fifteen miles above the mouth of the river, at Sheldrake Island, or 30 miles 
.above the mouth of the Bay, tho two main tributaries, the north-west and south-west, 
unite. The river is navigable to this point for large vessels, and for small craft some 
miles further. 

In 1876, the Department expended $2,955.48 in improving the navigation of the 
south-west river as far as Indiantown, 14 miles above the confluence, by removing a 

237 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



number of large boulders and cutting through the points of several shoals, thu 
allowing the passage of small steamers. During 1874-75, $4,000.00 were expended ii 
maintaining the Tug Service. 



HORSE-SHOE SHOAL. 



:£ 



The Horse-Shoe Shoal, which is of great extent, lies at the mouth of Miraraich 
Bay and is composed of sand and gravel. The work of making a channel through i. 
150 feet wide and 20 feet deep, was commenced in Angust, 1876, and has been con 
tinued since, the expenditure up to 30th June last, amounting to $42,293.23. 

SHIPPEGAN. 

Shippegan Harbour, Gloucester County, is at the southern extremity of Shippe 
gan Sound, an arm of the Baie des Chaleurs, with which it is united by Shippegai 
Channel. At the southern end the harbour is connected with the Gulf of St. Lawrenc< 
by Shippegan Gully. Vessels drawing 14 feet can reach the harbour by the nor then 
entrance, but the gully is used only by shallops and fishing boats. If the latter coul 
be deepened sufficiently to permit the passage of steamers bound from the ports ii 
the Straits of Northumberland to those in the Baie des Chaleurs, from 20 to 25 mile 
of rough water would be avoided. Before the construction of the Intercolonial Bail 
way, this was a matter of more general interest than it is at present. 

In October, 1875, a contract was made for the building of a Breakwater, 1,75' 
feet long, to protect the southern entrance of the gully, and a Dam, 870 feet long, t 
close an opening known as the " East Gully." Owing to the failure of the contractoi 
the works were suspended at the close of the summer of 1876, and re-let, in Decembei 
1877. Operations were resumed in April, 1878, but about the end of July," thesecom 
contractor stated his inability to proceed any further and the work was taken off hi 
hands by the Department. At this time the Dam was completed, about 900 feet c 
the Breakwater raised to its proper height, and about 500 feet partly built. On 21s 
October, 1879, a storm occurred, during which the tide rose 4 feet higher than befor 
known, and 2 feet above the top of the dam, injuring that structure considerably) ■- - 
while the outer 500 feet of the breakwater, which had been left unfinished, was concj 
pletely demolished, and the remainder much damaged. 

In 1880 and 1881, the dam was repaired, raised 2 feet, and strengthened by pilei{ l: 
driven 10 feet apart on each side, and waled and capped. 

The total expenditure has been $22,084.97. « 

|fb< 

GRAND ANSE. 

m 

Grand Anse, Gloucester County, is a small inlet on the south shore of the Bai L 1 *. ^ 
des Chaleurs, about midway between Bathurst and Shippegan. 

In the fall of 1875, a breakwater, 200 feet in length, was begun, and the work ojn 
it continued from time to time until its completion in 1879. The cost of the struct ; 
ture, including a small amount for repairs, has been $7,156.28. It is said to hav) 
been of much benefit to the neighbourhood. 

ft 

CLIFTON. 

Clifton, Gloucester County, is situated on the southern shore of the Baie den 
Chaleurs, about 19 miles eastward of the entrance to Bathurst Harbour. 

A breakwater was built some time ago by private parties, who, in 1878, tramj 
ferred their title to the Crown. In the same year a contract was made by th 
Department for the construction of an additional length with a spur at the end, witl 
the view of enclosing and protecting a small area wherein vessels can find shelteii 
The cost of the works, including maintenance and repairs, has been $9,681.75. 

238 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



BATHURST. 

Bathurst, the shiretown of Gloucester County, is situated at the head of 
Nipisiquit Bay, the south-western arm of the Baie des Chaleurs. The harbour basin 
is large and well sheltered,but, with the exception of a narrow channel in the middle 
and the beds of some streams which empty into it, it is all dry at low water. A 
depth of 14 feet can be carried up to the wharves of the town at high water, and 
there are several places where vessels may lie in 14 feet, at low water. The 
principal obstructions to the navigation are the Ballast, Seal, Inner and Outer Bars, 
|and, during 1875, 1876, 1878, 18?i*, 1881, the Department expended $24,505.25 in 
deepening the water over these by dredging. 

Spring tides rise 7 feet, and neaps 4 feet. 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND. 



NORTH COAST — NORTH POINT TO EAST POINT. 

The harbours on the north coast of Prince Edward Island are all of the same 
character, being obstructed by bars of shifting sand lying at various distances outside 
their mouths. With the exception of Malpeque, they are navigable for only small 
Ivessels, and are practically inaccessible during storms when there is a heavy sea run- 
ning, as the breakers then extend quite across, leaving no visible channel. 

These bars form a great impediment to ihe successful prosecution of the shore 
fisheries. The boats, when fishing in the offing, are obliged to run for the harbour on 
jthe approach of a storm much sooner than they would were the navigation clear, in 
[order to get across the bar before the sea begins to break on it. After the wind sub- 
jsides they are prevented from leaving the harbour until the sea on the bar has gone 
jdown. In this way it is estimated that one-third of their time, and frequently the 
■best of the fishing, is lost. 

Most of the works on this coast have therefore been designed for the purpose of 
opening the water on the bars and maintaining permanent channels. 

TIGNISH. 

Tignish Harbour is situated at the mouth of Tignish " Run," about eight miles 
it of North Point. It is only a boat harbour of limited area, but its improvement 
las given a great impetus to the fisheries in the vicinity. 

The works were begun by the Provincial Government in 1868, and up to 1873, 
when the Island entered into Confederation, the amount expended was $8,149.56. 
lince then the Department has expended in repairs and extensions $19,754.53. 

The works now consist of two breakwaters — the northern 850 feet, and the 
>uthern 300 feet, in length — and of 1,350 feet of breastwork of piles, brush and 
stone ; 800 feet of sheet piling, and about 500 feet of groynes. The result has been 
" that was expected. Prior to 1869 there was only one foot of water at the mouth 
the "Run," and only such small boats as could bs drawn up on the beach were used; 
ice the breakwaters were completed, the depth, which depends to some extent on 
le prevalence or otherwise of north-easterly winds, has never been less than five 
jt, and is generally more. Large two-masted boats are now employed. The fishing 
mnds on both sides of North Point are good, and much frequented by fishermea 
)m Caraquet, N.B., as well as by those belonging to the Island, and many of these 
>ek refuge at Tignish during storms. 

Spring tides rise 3 feet and neaps 2 feet. 

MALPEQUE. 

Malpeque Harbour lies at the mouth of Richmond Bay, It is pronounced by 
idmiral Bayfield to be " superior to any other on the northern coast of the Island, 

239 



4G Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18! 



having 16 feet over its bar at low water and from 18 to 19 at high water, ordinal 
spring tides, together with depth aud space enough inside for any description andl 
number of vessels." 

A breakwater, 600 feet long, has been built by the Department on the " Royalty 
Sands/' on the eastern side of the harbour to shelter the anchorage from north-easi 
winds which throw in a heavy sea through the eastern channel, and to afford 
shipping place for the produce of the surrounding country. The cost of this wori 
has been $15,278 53. 

NEW LONDON. 

The harbour of New London, or Grenville Bay, is about twelve miles east oj 
Malpeque. Pi ior to Confederation the Provincial Government had expended $4,075.64 
and since then the Department has expended $8,841.42 in the improvement o] 
the entrance. 

The work consists at present of a breakwater, 1,300 feet long, constructed partlj 
of piling and brush work and partly of cribwork. It stands on the beach at tl 
eastern side of the harbour and is intended to confine the ebb current and direct it oil 
to the bar as well as to prevent the sea from washing sand into the channel. Tl 
result of the construction of this work has been very satisfactory, the depth (| 
water on the bar having increased from 6 feet to 14 feet, in a channel 450 feet wic 
and this harbour is now one of the best on the coast having more water over its 
than any other except Malpeque. 

"Within the entrance the bay is three miles wide and receives the waters of 
South-west and Stanley Rivers, both of which are navigable by vessels drawing n( 
more than 10 feet of water, for a distance of five or six miles. 

Besides being a convenient locality for fishing, New London is the shipping po j 
for the produce of a large and fertile farming district. 

A further expenditure of about $5,000 is required to complete the design for ij 
improvement. 

GRAND RUSTICO. 

Rustico, one of the principal fishing stations on this coast is nearly equidistaj 
from the North and East Points. The harbour is of good size, and well sheltered, bj 
the entrance is rendered difficult by a bar of sand overlying clay, the chanr.ei throi 
which shifts frequently, and on which the depth of water is generally not more thi 
six or seven feet at low water, and sometimes even less after a long duration 
north- easterly winds. 

The bay inside Robinson's Island is about five miles long by half a mile wic 
and there is another narrow entrance two miles east of the harbour. 

The Provincial Government has expended small sums from time to til 
amounting, in the aggregate, to $2,616.70 in protecting the beaches. 

A contract was made in December, 1881, by the Department for the consti 
tion of a breakwater 1,200 feet long on the west side, and one 450 feet long on 
east side of the entrance, the object being to concentrate the ebb current upon 
bar for the purpose of maintaining, if possible, a constant depth of ten feet at 1( 
water, which is said to be sufficient for the present demands of the port, Shoi 
any greater depth be found requisite hereafter, the presence of clay will rent 
dredging necessary. Total expenditure by the Department, $4,549.60. 



ST. PETEES. 

St. Peter's Harbour, generally called St. Peter's Bay, is of creat extent, runnij! 
in eight miles, with an average width of three-quarters of a mile, and having a de\ 
of from two to three fathoms, but there being only from five to six feet at low wai 
over the bar at its mouth, with a rise of tide of from two to four feet, none but si 
ressels can enter. In 1868 a breakwater of brush and stone, 600 feet long, built 

240 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



he Provincial Government, stood on the eastern side of the entrance. This has now 
learly disappeared, being partly destroyed by storms and buried in the accumulated 
land, but it has to some extent been useful in preventing the sea from washing away 
,, he point. 

The Department has expended $6,387.84 in constructing a pier 2'26 feet long on 
!he western wide, to afford shelter to fishing boats, and a breastwork 80 feet long to 
preserve the beach from the encroachments of the sea. 

oampbell's cove. 

Campbell's Cove, about nine miles from East Point, is an indentation in the coast, 
>n from north-west to east south-east, or over an arc of nearly 160°. In 1872, the 
>vincial Government built a detached breakwater, 300 feet long, on a reef which 
mds from the west point of the Cove, at a cost of $4,530. The Department has 
3e repaired this structure, raised it two feet, connected it with the shore, and built 
extension of 250 feet, with an expenditure of $7,421.42. 

The coast from St. Peter's Bay to East Point, a distance of 36 miles, is an 
>roken range of sandstone cliffs, with a few sandy beaches at the mouths of 
dl streams where boats can land only in fine weather. The formation of a har- 
ir at Campbell's Cove will therefore be of great benefit to the fishing and farming 
lustries of that neighbourhood. 

Spring tides rise 3 J feet, and neaps 2 feet. 

BAST COAST — EAST POINT TO CAPE BEAR. 
COLVILLE BAY. 

Colville Bay is about 16 miles from East Point. It is rather more than a mile 

width between Knight's and Lobster Points and half a mile in transverse depth. 

anchorage is good and safe with all northerly winds, and in order to afford 

ielter from southerly winds the Dominion G-overnmont has built a breakwater, 

160 feet long, on the east side of the bay, at a cost for construction and repairs up 

June last, of $100,436.81. The breakwater stands in 22 feet water for a great 

art of its length, and is exposed to a very heavy sea during southerly storms. 

The Souris River falls into the west side of Colville Bay, and up to 1873 the 
rovincial Government had expended $9,251.42 in building a breastwork of brush 
" stone, nearly a mile long, at the mouth, for the purpose of forming a harbour for 
11 vessels. This work is now much out of repair. 

Colville Bay is the principal shipping place for the eastern end of the Island, and 
the eastern terminus of tho railway. 






GRAND RIVER. 

Grand River, seven miles from Colville Bay, wouid be a fine harbour were it not 
its shallow bar and the intricate nature of the channel at its mouth. It is about 
iree miles long, one mile wide, and has a depth of from 3 to 5 fathoms. 

There are settlements on both sides of the river, which can be ascended by 
ts as far as the bridge, a distance of seven miles from its mouth. 
The bar, which lies about a mile outside, had only 6 feet on it at low water, and 
r about half a mile inside of Bank's Point, the channel, though it has a low water 
th of from 10 to 16 feet, was narrow and crooked. 

The bum of $8, 963.97 has been expended in 1878-79, in improving the entrance 
rjfiB dredging the bar aud channel. 

Spring tides rise 4 J feet, and neaps 2 J feet. 

241 
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4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



!! 



MONTAGUE. 

Montague Eiver falls into Georgetown Harbour from the west. During 18Yi 
and 1878, the Department expended $17,119.49 in improving the channel bj 
dredging. Vessels of a considerable size can now ascend the river for a distance o^ 
6 miles above Georgetown, or as far as the bridge where the produce of a large 
fertile tract of country is annually shipped. 

SOUTH RLVER. 

South Eiver falls into Murray Harbour, about 2 miles within the entrance. It 
navigable, at ordinary high water, for vessels of 30 or 40 tons burthen, for about 
mile above its mouth ; but the channel being narrow and very crooked, it is propose<j 
to straighten it to some extent, by dredging, and up to the end of June last 
$1,070.59 had been expended for that pnrpose. This is the most convenient place c| 
•hipment for the district lying south of Murray Eiver. 

Spring tides rise 6J feet, and neaps 3J feet. 

Murray Harbour bar has a depth of 10 feet over it at low water. 

SOUTH OOAST, — CAPE BEAR TO WERT POINT. 
WOOD ISLANDS. 

Wood Islands, about 15 miles west of Cape Bear, are two small islets, about 5J 
feet high, connected by a sand beach, their total length being 4,200 feet. They if 
parallel to the shore, from which they are distant about half a mile. The western p< >ii| 
is connected with the main land by a sand bar, and a spit of sand runs out from 
shore to within about 300 feet of the western end of the eastern islet. A pond wilj 
an are& of about 300 acres is thus enclosed, having an outlet at its south-east* 
corner. 

The pond itself is too shallow to serve even as a boat harbour, and an attei 
has been made to form a shelter for boats and small coasting -essels on the inside 
the eastern island by extending a pier easiwardly from the end of the sand spit ai 
parallel to the shore, with the expectation that th? ycour caused by the tidal outflc 
from the pond would keep clear of sand a channel having 10 feet at high water, ai 
greater depth being unattainable without dredging, as tough blue clay underlies t]| 
sand. 

The Provincial Government began this work in 1859, and has extended it froj 
time to time .to a length of between 2,400 and 2,500 feet. It is constructed partly ] 
brush and partly of cribwork, and has never been properly finished. No expendil 
has been made on it by the Department. 

A breakwater 500 feet long has been built on the eastern point of the Islands 
the Department, at a cast of $5,324.93, and the sum of $548 spent in dredging 
channel . 

PINETTE HARBOUR. 

Pinette Harbour, four miles east of Point Prim and 12 miles west of Wood Islai 
is fit only for small vessels, having but 10 feet over its rocky bar at high water spi 
tides. The channel inside carries from three to four fathoms for 2J miles to 
fihipping place. 

The sum of $756.24 has been expended by the Department in straightening tj 
channel near the wharf by dredging. 

VERNON RIVER. 

Yernon Eiver falls into Orwell Bay, 18 miles east of Charlottetown. Ins] 
China Point, at the confluence of the Orwell and Vernon Eiver* 1 , there is good anchf 

242 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



age whore vessels may lie land-locked in a channel 500 feet wide, and carrying five 
fathoms water. 

Vessels can ascend the Vernon River for more than a mile at low water and as 
far as the bridge, 3 miles above China Point, at high water. The channel for about 
' a mile below the bridge is obstructed by oyster beds, and $6,326.72 has been expended 
by the Department in improving it by dredging. 

POWNAL. 

Pownal Bay is shoal, and open to westerly winds, but the country about it being 
fertile and thickly settled, it is the shipping place for a large quantity of farm pro- 
: duce. The Department has expended $11,165.85 in deepening a channel to the wharf 
near the head of the bay. 

CHARLOTTETOWN. 

Charlottetown Harbour is about half a mile wide at its entrance, but shallow 
irater exteuding from both side* reduces the navigable channel to little more than 
iialf that width ; within the entrance the channel expands, forming a harbour with 
ipace and depth enough for vessels of the largest class. Three rivers, the Hills- 
iboro' or East River, the York or North River, and the Elliott or West River, unite 
n the harbour. 

Of these the Hillsboro' is the largest, being navigable for vessels of great draught 
for seven or eight miles, and ior small vessels as far as Mount Stewart, sixteen miles 
ibove Charlottetown. In some places the channel is obstructed by old oyster beds. 
The Department has expended $3,223.41 in removing some of these, and in deepen- 
ing the water at il Hickey's Wharf." 

York River, the smallest of the three, is crossed by a bridge at Poplar Island, 
ee miles from its mouth. 

Elliot River may be ascended four or five miles by large vessels, and about ten 
)y small vessels. 

In Charlottetown Harbour the Department expended during 1875 and 1876 the 
am of $10,264.56 in deepening the water at the railway wharf, and, in 1878, $3,096.29 
work of a similar description at the Rocky Point Ferry landing on the south bank 
f the Elliot River. 

Spring tides rise 10 feet, and neaps 7 feet. 



NINE MILE CREEK. 



%i\m Nine Mile Creek, five miles west of the Blockhouse Light at the entrance of 
"harlottetown Harbour, is a shallow inlet opening into the passage between St. 
eter's Island and the main land. It is accessible for only small vessels. A channel 
deltas been dredged to the wharf at a cost of $6,286.46. 



nog; 



CRAPAUD. 



Crapaud is a small but secure anchorage at the mouth of the Brockelsby River, 
en miles west of St. Peter's Island. The Department hasexpended $19,151.46 in, 
nproving the entrance by dredging. 

ter» 

WEST OOAST, — WEST POINT TO NORTH POINT. 
MIMINEGASH, 

North or Big Miminegash is twenty miles from West Point and eighteen miles 
>m North Point. 
There are no natural harbours on this coast, for though South Miminegash, Skin- 
,or's Pond and Nail Pond afford shelter for boats, their outlets are nearly dry at low 
rater. 

243 
10a~16J 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 



North Miminegash, before its improvement, was of the same character, but ijj 
has some advantage over the others, inasmuch as it is a good deal sheltered b] 
Miminegash Beef, a ledge of rock nearly a mile long,which lies parallel to the shore 
the distance of about half a mile. The reef is nearly dry at low water, but there is 
channel with 2\ fathoms between it, and the shore. 

The pond inside the sand beaches is of sufficient size to furnish a considerabl 
quantity of scour in the channel during ebb tide. 

Tne works at this place consist of two piers, the nojthern 470 feet long, and tl 
southern, 150 feet long. The expenditure, up to the 30th of June, amounted 
$6,466.57. 

A number of large boats are engaged in the mackerel fishery, and the improvj 
ments have given much satisfaction, as the fishermen can now enter or leave 
harbour in safety at all times of tide. 

Tides rise from 2 to 3 feet. 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 



House Harbour. 

House Harbour is in the Magdalen Islands, Gulf of St. Lawrence. 
The Government Dredge " Canada " was engaged from the 19th July to the \\ 
August, 1873, in removing 680 tons of coarse gravel, at a cost of $2,291.60. 
Total expenditure since Confederation, $2,291.t>0. 

ETANQ DU NORD. 

Etang du Nord is situated at the western extremity of Grindstone Island, onej 
the Magdalen group, in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. 

In 1881 the construction of a breakwater, from 750 to 800 feet in length, 
commenced, and during the fiscal year a length of 225 feet was completed. Itj 
intended to form a harbor of refuge for the numerous fishing craft frequenting 1| 
islands. The depth of water in the inside harbor varies from 10 to 14 feet dui 
extreme low water, 

Neap tides rise 1 \ feet ; springs rise 3 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $12,912.63. 

AMHERST HARBOUR. 



Amherst Island is one of the most important of the Magdalen group, and 
situated in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence, about 140 miles south east of Perce. 

The harbour is capable of accommodating from 200 to 300 vessels, and is mi 
frequented by fishing craft. It has a depth of from 15 to 20 feet. On 1st Janus 
1865, the harbour was placed under the control of the Trinity House, Quebec, 
prior to Confederation the sum of $400 was expended for placing and removing bu( 

In 1870 it was decided to improve the entrance to the harbour, which 
crooked and had a width of only 30 to 50 feet, with a depth of from 5 to 7 feet at 
water. Operations were commenced in 1871 and continued until 1874, the entrail 
being straightened, and the width increased to 150 feet by a depth of 9 to 10 fee) 
low water. The material removed from the bar was almost all rock. 

Tides rise 2 to 3 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $14,283.21. 

244 



Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A # 188$ 



OASPE BAY AND HARBOUR. 

Situated at the eastern extremity of the Peninsula of Gaspe. The buoys in the 
and harbour were placed under control of the Quebec Trinity House by Order, 

Jouncil, 8th August, 1864, prior to which time $787.11 had boon spent by the 

►vincial Government in placing them. 
No expenditure has boon made since Confederation. 

NEW CARLISLE. 

Now Carlisle is the chef lieu of the County of Bonaventure, and is on the north 
>re of the Baie des Chaleurs, 65 miles from Campbellton, N.B., with which place 
>re is semi-weekly communication during the season of navigation by the steamer 
ring between Campbellton and Gaspe in connection with the Intercolonial Railway. 

A pier was commenced here, in 1881, on a site donated by Lieut.-Governor 
>itaille, and the municipality also promised to donate $2,500. Owing to the 
>osed position of the pier, only 180 feet of the work to the level of high water was 

in place during the working season, leaving a length of 320 feet still to be con- 
icted to connect with the shore, together with the superstructure over the whole 

;th. Depth of water at the outer end of the pier varies from 13 to 14 feet during 

water of spring tides. 

Neap tides rise 35 feet ; springs rise 6*5 feet. 

Total cost since Confederation, $4,2 iO.20. 

CARLETON. 

Carleton is situated in the County of Bonaventure, on the north shore of the Baie 
Chaleurs, thirty-six miles below Campbellton, N.B. 

During the seasons of 1881-82, the construction of a landing pier was commenced 
the accommodation of the steamer plying between Campbellton and Gaspe Basin in 
iect ; on with the Intercolonial; and at the close of the fiscal year the work was 
•ly completed. 

The pior is built of crib work filled with stone, and is 25 feet in length, by 28 
wide, with a head 90 x 20 feet. Depth of water at end of pier, at extreme low 
>r, 10J feet. 

Neap tides rise 3*5 feet, springs rise 6-5 feet. 

The Municipality of Carleton contributed $2,500 towards building the pier. 
Total expenditure since Confederation, $4,665.31. 

CAP CHATTE HARBOUR. 

The Cap Chatte Eiver is on the Gaspe coast of the River St. Lawrence, about 
ro and a-half miles to the north-east of the Cape from which it takes its name. 
The entrance to the river was obstructed by a bar of sand and gravel which was 
Iged, in 1871-72, to a depth of feet at low water so as to admit small vessels. 
Neap tides rise 5 feet ; spring tides 8 feet. 
Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation $792.20. 

MATANE. 



The village of Matane is in the County of Rimouski, on the south shore of the 
it. Lawrence, 240 miles below Quebec, and distant thirty miles, by way of Little 
letis, from St. Octave, the nearest point on the Intercolonial Railway. 

In 1879 the sum of $10,000 was placed in the estimates for the construction of a 
mding pier, which would be dry at low water, and have 20 feet at its outer end at 
lgh water, ordinary spring tides. The amount was expended by a syndicate ap- 
ointed by the village, by day's labour, under the supervision of the Department* 

245 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188J 



The pier consists often cribs, placed 25 feet apart. The lengths of the cribs are : one 
of 60 feet, four of 30 feet and five of 15 feet, making a total of 480 feet. The blocks 
are 30 feet wide. The spaces between the cribs were protected, during the summer 
of 1882, with rows of close piling, which have had the desired effect of accumulating 
the sand on the upper side which formerly passed through the openings, filling the 
channel. The pier is dry at low water ; but has 6 feet at its outer end at one-third 
flood, and 15*5 feet at high water. 

Neap tides rise 6*7 feet ; springs rise 14 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $11,271.43. 

RIVER BLANCHE. 

The River Blanche flows through the County of Rimouski, and empties into the 
St. Lawrence on its southern shore, about twenty-six miles east of the lliver Metis 
and nine miles from Matane. 

In 1875-76 a mooring pier 70x30 at the base and battering to 60x24 at the top 
with a total height of 18 feet from base to summit, was built here. The level of th< 
pier having been found to be too low and its dimensions somewhat limited, ai 
addition of sixty feet was made at the eastern end in 1£79, and the whole structun 
raised ihree courses and a slip built on the south or shore side. This pier is abou 
550 feet from the shore, and could easily be connected with it by crib work so as t< 
afford an excellent landing place accessible at high tide to vessels engaged in th« 
coasting trade. 

Neap tides rise 6-7 feet; spring rise 14 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation $5,101.73. 



[rimouski. 

The village of Eimouski is the chef lieu of the County of the same nrrae. and i 
situated on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, 179 miles below Quebec. It is an i 
portant station on the Intercolonial, fifty -four and a-half miles below Eiver du Loup 
and the point at which the Allan steamers land and receive mails and passenge 
during the summer. 

In 1855 a pier was completed, about one mile below the village, at a cost 
$106,944.80. 

Total expenditure for repairs since Confederation, $2,616.00 

TROIS PISTOLES. 

Trois Pistoles is in the County of Temiscouata, on the south shore of the 
Lawrence, about 148 miles below Quel ec. 

At the Session of Parliament in 1881, the sum of $3,500 was voted for 
erection of a landing pier; and during the year a block, 50 feet by 30 feet, 
constructed off the western side of the harbour, and many boulders were remov 
from the harbour proper. The work of connecting the block with the shore w 
be continued so as to make it available as a landing. 

Neap tides rises 11 feet; spring rise 17 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $3,500. 

RIVER DU LOUP (EN BAS). 

The village of Eiver du Loup is the chef lieu of the County of Temiscouata, a 
is situated on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, 114 miles below Quebec. 

The pier is at the extremity of a point of land about one mile distant from tjij 
village, and is built of wood and stone. It is 1,641 feet in length, and its breadth|J 
30 feet excepting the last 50 feet, which is 124 feet wide. At the outer extrenr 
«lhe pior is 42 feet above the bottom of the river, and the depth of water at extvoM 3 

246 



;!6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



I'ow tide was 16 feet at the time the pier -was built. It was completed in 1855 at a 
■host of $170,129.35. 

In 1879 the work of repairing the pier was commenced and was carried on 
I luring the three following years. It having been found that the inner end of 
I :he pier was too low, and that heavy seas sometimes broke over it and washed out 
I ;he gravel roadway, the level of the pier wan raised 8 feet and the roadway planked 
i wer. A bei'th for vessels on the western side of the pier was dredged to a depth of 
16 feet at low water. 

J Neap tides rise 12 feet ; spring rise 18 feet. 
Total expenditure since Confederation, $16,104.19. 



ESCOUMAINS. 

Escoumains Harbour is situated on the north shore of the River St. Lawrence, 
>ut 25 miles below Tadoussac, in the County of Saguenay. Boulders, obstructing 
le access to the wharves, were removed at a cost of $1,189.80. This work was 
performed in 1881. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,189.80. 



TADOUSSAC. 

Is the chef lieu of the County of Saguenay, and is on the east side of the River 
Jaguenay, about 122 miles below Quebec. 

A fish breeding establishment is in operation here under the control of the De- 
mrtment of Marine and Fisheries ; and up the 1st July, 1882, the sum of $4,046.46 was 
pended in reconstructing the three dams previously constructed, and in building a 
burth dam at a lower level near the public road of l'Anse a l'eau. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet; springs rise 17 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $4,046.46.. 

ANSE DU PORTAGE. 

Anse du Portage is situated at the mouth of the River Saguenay, opposite 
Cadoussac 

At the Session of Parliament, 1881, an appropriation was made for the construc- 
ion of a landing for the purpose of facilitating the transportation of the mails during 
he winter across the Saguenay to and from Tadoussac, and work was prosecuted 
uring the years 1881-82. 

This landing, when complete, will consist of an incline plane 90 feet in length, at 
he head of which, on a platform 14 feet long, will be placed a windlass, by the means of 
vhich the mail boat can be drawn up and placed in safety. To prevent the accumu- 
ation of ice on the slip when the wind is from the north-east and east, a jetty 108 
set in length has been constructed on the eastern side. At the close of the fiscal 
r ear the works were well under way, and would be completed in time for service 
luring the winter of 1882-83. 

The depth of water at the end of the landing pier is 4 feet during extreme low 
rater, and 21 feet during ordinary high water of spring tides. 

Ordinary neap tides rise 10 feet, spring tides 17 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $584.43. 

ANSE ST. JEAN. 

Anse St. Jean is situated on tho south-western shore of the River Saguenay,, 
wenty-five miles from its mouth. The work here consists of a landing pier 366 feet 
n length, having a depth of seven and a half feet at low water at its outer end. The 
rork was commenced by the Local Government in 1876, and continued by theDomin- 
on Government in 1879-80, 1880-81 and 1881-82. Further work, required to com- 
plete the pier, will be proceeded with during 1882-83. 

247 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Neap tides rise 12 feet, ordinary spring tides 17 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $4,752.63 by Dominion Government, and 
$1,700 by Local Government and Municipality, etc. 

BAGOTVILLE. 

St. Alphonse de Bagotville, is at the head of the Ha! Ha! Bay, on the north- 
west shore of the River Saguenay, 66 miles from its mouth. 

A landing pier was built here, prior to Confederation, by the parochial author- 
ities, at a cost of about $3,200. In 1876, an arm was built, by the Department, o 
the south side of this pier, 55 feet long by 26 feet wide, at a cost of $3,084.34. I 
1881, the pier was strengthened and repaired at a cost of $3,897.70. Some years ago 
a part of the inshore portion of the pier was burnt to the water's edge. During th< J 
year 1881 -83, a length of 378 feet was re-constructed to a mean height of 10 feet, i 
large portion of the flooring renewed, and other repairs made. A sum of $3,500 hai 
been granted for the construction of a block at the outer end of the pier. 

Depth of water at the end of pier, 20 feet, at extreme low water, which deptl 
will be increased to 29 feet,. when the proposed block is built. 

Ordinary neap tides rise 11 feet; spring tides 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $9,186.63. 

RIVER SAGUENAT. 

The Kiver Saguenay is one of the main tributaries of the St. Lawrence, intcjwa 
which it flows at Tadoussac, 122 miles below Quebec. 

The channel of the river near the village of Chicoutimi has been greatlj 
obstructed by loose rock and boulders, and during the seasons of 1880, 1881 and 188! 
operations have been carried on to remove thet-e obstructions and improve the char 
nel to the harbour. The channel is being deepened to a depth of 10 feet durin, 1 
extreme low water, for an extent of three and one-half miles, and a width varying 
from 150 to 200 feet. About three-quarters of a mile remained to be completed i\t 
end of fiscal year. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet ; spring's rise 16 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $13,559.94. 

CHICOUTIMI. 

The town of Chicoutimi is situated on the southern side of the Saguenay Rive 
ieventy-one and a-half miles from Tadoussac, and at the head of navigation. 

A landing pier was erected here in 1874-75, at a cost of $14,193.40 ; and, i 
1881 the head of the pier was strengthened on its up stream side by the constructs 
of a block 40 feet in length, at a cost of $1,999.91. Extensive repairs were madi 
iu 1881-82. 

Depth of wator at end of pier 7 feet during extreme low water 

Ordinary neap tides rise 8 feet, spring tides 12 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $17,017.61. 









LAKE ST. JOHN. 



Lake St. John is a large body of water, over 85 miles in circumference, about li* 
miles on an air line north of Quebec. Its greatest length is about 30 miles, and I 
least width 18 miles, and it covers an area of about 365J- square miles. Its depth i 
about 3 feet, at 1 mile from the snore, increasing to depths of 12 to 54 feet, half a m I 
further out. It is surrounded by a fine agricultural country, and eight large rivtj* 
flow into it. Its discharge is into the Eiver Saguenay, through two outlets known 
La Graude Deeharge, and Petite Decharge. As the discharge of these outlets is co- 
parativeJy small, and less than the inflow of the rivers emptying into the lake, it folio i 

248 



, 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



that during spring freshets, the waters of the lake rise from 15 to 20 feet, and have been 
known to rise as much as 30 to 35 feet, flooding the surrounding country. Owing to 
the limited size of La Grande Decharge and La Petite Decharge, the waters of the 
lake subside slowly, and the submerged lands usually dry out too late for agricul- 
tural purposes. 

The work of widening the Grande Decharge at one or two points has been 
undertaken, with the view of increabing its area, and thus permitting a greater flow 
of water during the continuance of freshets, and a quicker subsidence of the lake. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $6,303.16. 

RIVER QUELLE. 

The village of Kiver Ouelle is situated on the river of that name, in the County 
of Karmouraska, seventy'fiye miles below Quebec. 

The pier is on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, four and one-half miles below the 
village. It is built of wood and stone, and its total length is 1219 feet by a width of 28 
feet. The block at the outer end is 23*7 J feet in length by a width of 5 1 feet, and the top 
of the pier is 42 feet above the bottom of the river. At low water, spring tides, there 
is 14 feet depth at the outer end. It was completed in 1855 at a cost of $225,229.8*7. 
In 1875 a lighthouse was erected on this pier by the Department of Marine and 
Fisheries. 

Since Confederation the gravel roadway along the top of the pier has been 
I frequently washed out by heavy seas breaking over the pier; and, in 1879, the entire 
roadway was planked over at a cost of $ 12,271.25. 

The level of the pier, especially at the whore end, is rather low ; and in case of 
a storm during high water spring tides the waves dash over the piers rendering 
access to the outer end dangerous, and at times impossible. In 1881 the work £of 
raising the level of the pier was commenced, and was in progress at the close of the 
fiscal year, 30th Juno, 1882. 

Neap tides rise 12 feet; spring's rise 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $12,848.53. 

cap A l'aigle. 

Cap a l'Aigle is situated on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, three miles from 
Murray Bay, in the County of Charlevoix. 

During the seasons of 1881-82, a landing pier 160 feet long by 35 wide, and 
having 18 feet depth at its outer end at low water, was built by the Department. 

Neap tides rise 12 feet, springs rise 19 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $2,946.25. 

MALBAIE (OR MURRAY BAY.) 

Murray Bay is the best known and most frequented watering place on the St. 

wrence, and is situated on the north shore, in the County of Charlevoix, eighty- 

ree and one-half miles below Quebec. The steamers of the Saguenay Navigation 

ompany call here daily, except Monday, both ascending and descending, and quite 

heavy traffic is done. 

In 1855 a pier was built on a point of land at the entrance of the bay, called 
ointe au Pic, distant about two miles from the village church. It was 470 feet in 
ength by 30J- wide, with the exception of the block at the outer end which was 108 
ieet wide. The depth of water into the outer end of the pier was 18 feet at low tide, 
ind the total cost up to Confederation, $53,487.20. 

In 1875 an addition of 30 feet was made to the block, wn*ich then reached 19 feet 
f water at low water, ordinary spring tides. 
Neap tides rise 12 feet ; springs rise 18 feet. 
Total expenditure since Confederation, $17,937.04. 

249 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188 J 



EBOULEMENTS. 



The village of Ebouleincnts is on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, 69 miles 
below Quebec, in the County of Charlevoix. 

A. landing pier 920 feet long by 30 J wide, and having 15 feet depth of water at 
its outer end at extreme low water, or 17 5 feet ordinary springs, was built about 3 
miles from the village, in 1853, at a cost of $65,531.52. 

In 1875 a wing 50 feet long by 41 feet 6 inches wide was added to the eastward 
side of the head ; and necessary repairs have, from time to time, been made. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet ; springs rise 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1-5,450.31. 



BAIE ST. PAUL. 

Baie St. Paul is on the north shore of the St. Lawrence,between Cape aux Corbeaux 
and Cape Labaie, about sixty miles beloM Quebec. 

In 1874-75, a pier was built on the westerly side of the bay, between the River du 
Gouffre and L'Anse a Charpentier. The pier is 200 feet long by 30 feet wide, with a 
head 60 feet long and 50 leet wide, and is about 3,000 feet from high water mark, 
spring tides, and 600 feet from low water mark, neap tide. The depth of water at 
end of pier is 12 feet at low tide. The pier is not connected with the shore, and wag 
built for the purpose of putting a lighthouse on it, and for the accommodation of light- 
ships when they are being taken to or brought from their moorings in the St. 
Lawrence. 

During the winter of 1881-82, a large quantity of timber was procured for a 
landing pier at Pointe Rouge, Cap aux Corbeaux, and its construction was commerced 
in May, 1882. The new pier will be 850 feet long, by 30 feet wide, with a depth of 
12 feet at its outer end at lowest spring tides. 

Neap tides rise 12 feet, spring tides 19 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $30,982,73. 

ILE AUX COUDRES. 



He aux Coudres is an island in the St. Lawrence, about twelve miles from Baie St. 
Paul. 

In November, 1880, a contract was entered into with a number of the inhabi- 
tants representing the municipality, which had voted a sum of $4,000 for th 
construction of a landing pier, and the work was completed in 1881. The pier ii| 
263 feet long by 32 feet wide, and has 16 feet of water at its outer end at low tide 

Neap tide rise 9 feet; springs rise 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $3,718.00 

ST. JEAN PORT JOLI. 



& 



h\ 



9 



St. Jean Port Joli is in the County of L'Islet, fifty-five and three-quarter mile* 
below Quebec, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence. 

This pier was originally bui't by the syndics of the village, at an expenditure o 
$2,000. In 18*8, the Government granted the sum of $2,000, on condition of a lik< 
sum being expended by the syndics. The portion of the pier built by the syndic; 
was considered so insecure that it had to be strengthened, and partially reconstructed 

The pier is 332 feet long, with a width of 40 leet for a distance of sixty feet 
the outer end, and of 20 feet for the remainder of its length. It is dry at low wate 
but has eight and a-half feet at its outer end at half tide. 

Neap tides riee 11 feet ; springs rise 17 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $3,6li7.82. 

L 'IS LET. 

The village of L'Islet, in the County or the same name, is situated on the sout 
.shore of the St. Lawrence, 46f miles below Quebec. 

250 









46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A* 1883 



A landing pier was built here, in 1855, at a cost of $113,343.27. The pier is- 
1,104 feet long by 31 feet wide, with the exception of the last 50 feet, where the 
width is increased to 118 feet. The outer end of the pier is 34 feet high, and at the 
time of completion it had 8J feet depth of water, at extreme low tide, but some filling 
up has taken place, and now there is not more than *7| feet. 

In 18*76 the restoration of the pier was commenced, and completed in 18*19, the 
amount expended being $21,613.36. The superstructure, to the extent of six or seven 
courses, was generally replaced with new face timbers and cross ties, and thoroughly 
filled with stone where required. The level of the shore end, which was lower thari 
the head, and over which heavy seas would break, rendering it dangerous, was- 
raised, the roadway planked from end to end, and the slips put in good order. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet, springs rise 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $25,925.60. 

Ile aux Grues. 

He aux Grues, or Crane Island, is situated in the St. Lawrence, opposite Cap St; 
Ignace, thirty miles below Quebec. 

In 1862 a block and lighthouse were erected here at a cost of $10,334.42, near 
the upper end of the island. This block has been used as a landing for passengers 
and freight at times of high water, access being had from the main land during the 
period of low water. To enable vessels to call and land goods, etc., at low water, a.. 
contract was entered into in November, 1881, for the construction of a pier projecting 
171 feet from the block into 6 feet depth of water at low tide. At the close of th$ 
fiscal year the work was about one-third completed. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet ; springs rise 18 teet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $2,636.18. 

GROSSE ILE. 

Grosse Lie is an Ibland in the St. Lawrence, thirty-three miles below Quebec 
and about midway of the river, which is about nine miles wide. 

A quarantine station was established here in 1832, and extensive buildings have 
been erected. In 1848 a pier 345 feet long by 48 wide was built at the south-western 
•xtremity of the island. In 1866 a sma'l pier 120 feet in length by 28 feet in width was 
erected at the eastern end of the island for the special accommodation of the sick. 
The cost of these two piers up to the time of Confederation was $1*7,280.28. 

In 18*72 the eastern pier was extended at a cost of $4,081.91, and in 18*76-17 
the western pier, which was much decayed, was repaired and partly rebuilt at an 
expenditure of $8,5*79.58. The eastern pier was repaired and extended so as to reach 
10 feet at low water. 

During 1881 and 1882, a block 30 x 50 teet dimensions was built at the end of 
the eastern pier to admit the approach of vessels during low tide. A crib- work block, 
100 feet in length, was built from the inner end of the pier to the shore, and a road 
250 feet long constructed to the main highway. 

Neap tides rise 13 feet ; springs rise 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, §22,721.82 ($12,661.49 being included in 
expenditure for Grosse Isle Quaiantine Station). 

ST. THOMAS DE MONTMAGNY. 

St. Thomas de Montmagny is the chef lieu of the County of Montmagny, and is 
on the souih bhore of the St. Lawrence, thirty-five miles below Quebec. 

In 18*79-80 an isolated block 30 feet by 30 feet, and having 5 feet of water at 
its outer end at low water spring tides was built, 100 feet from the shore. In 1880-81 
it was connected with the shore, thus foiminga convenier.it landing place for small 
craft. 

251 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



Neap tides rise 12 feet; springs rise 20 feet. 
Total expenditure since Confederation, $5,256.96. 

■I* 

BERTHIER (EN BAs). 

The village^of Berthier is on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, twenty-four one- 
lialf miles below Quebec. 

A landing pier was completed in 1853, at a cost of $37,724.14, and the sum of 
$1,760 was expended for repairs up to 30th June, 1867. The pier is of stone and 
wood. It projects into the river, 466 feet ; its breadth is 32 feet, but the last 5*7 feet 
in the water are increased to 60 feet; its height at the river end is 34 feet, and it had 
at its completion 15 feet depth of water at its outer end at low spring tides. 

In 1877-78, the pier was thoroughly repaired, some of the side timbers and ties 
which had become decayed, were replaced, and the whole roadway planked over to I 
protect it from the heavy seas which frequently broke over the pier, and washed out 
the broken stone of the roadway. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet, spring tides 18 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $9,024.15. 

STE. FAMILLE. 

The village of St. Famille is on the Island of Orleans, seventeen miles below 
^Quebec. 

In 1876, the inhabitants constructed a small landing pier. In 1879, the Depart- 
ment built a block 30 by 30 feet, and in 1880 extended it and built the two blocks 
shorewards. The whole has since been connected with the shore and forms a con- 
venient landing place for small crafts, having eight and a-half feet of water at its outer 
<©nd at half tide. 

Neap tides rise 12 feet ; springs rise 19 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $9,323,86. 

ST. JEAN D'ORLEANS. 

The village of St. Jean D' Orleans is on the island of Orleans, twenty miles below 
Quebec. 

The local authorities built a landiug pier here 65 feet by 50 feet, and having 2Q 
feet of water at its outer end, at half tide. It was damaged by ice during the winter 
<»f 1880-81, and repaired by the Department. 

Neap tides rise 12 feet; springs rise 19 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $470.93. 

ST. LAURENT. 

The village of St. Laurent is situated on the Island of Orleans, fifteen miles 
below Quebec. 

In 186 1> the construction of a pier to carry a lighthouse was commenced here, 
and up to Confederation the expenditure had been $8,416.58. After Confederation 
the work was completed at a further cost of $15,979.70. The pier is 583 feet in 
length. The block at its outer end is 104 feet long by 32 feet wide, and the remainder 
of the pier in 20 feet wide. There is 7 feet of water at the outer end of the pier at 
low water ordinary spiing tides. 

In 1879-80 and '81 some repairs were made to the pier. 

Neap tides rise 12 feet ; springs rise 19 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $17,245.83. 

252 






46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



QUEBEC HARBOUR. 

A survey of the estuary of the Eiver St. Charles, at Quebec, was made during 
the winter of 1875-76, for the purpose of ascertaining the nature of the bed of th# 
river, of establishing the velocity of the current^, &c. See Appendix No. 7. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $6,458.02. 

LES ECUREUILS. 

The village of Les Ecureuils is situated in the County of Portneuf, on the north 
tide of the St. Lawrence Eiver, 25 miles above Quebec. 

Daring the years 1881-82 a small landing pier 70 feet long by 20 feet wide was 
built here. The pier is dry at extreme low water, but has 12 feet at its outer end 
at high water, spring tides. 

Neap tides rise 10 feet; spring tides rise 16 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation $1,571.13. 

RIVER NICOLET. 

The Eiver Nicolet empties into the St. Lawrence on its southern shore at the 
foot of Lake St. Peter. 

In October, 1881, a contract was entered into for the construction of works for 
the improvement of the harbor and the entrance thereto, but, owing to the extreme 
height of the water in the St. Lawrence during the past summer, the work of pile- 
giving, etc., was not proceeded with before the close of the fiscal year of 1881-82. 
The works, as contracted for, are to consist of dredging from the entrance from 
Lake St Peter to the harbor proper, a channel 75 feet in width at the bottom and 
about 5,000 feet in length, with a basin 150 feet in width, the whole to have a depth 
of 8 feet at extreme low water. The entrance to be protected on either side by pile- 
work, that on the eastern side of the river to be 3,500 feet in length, and that on the 
western side 3,100. 

Total expenditure, $594.52. 

RIVER DU LOUP (EN HAUT). 

The Eiver du Loup (en haut) empties into Lake St. Peter, on the north shore, 
County of Maskinonge, 21 miles west of Three Eivers. 

In 1873, the sum of $2,000 was expended in the improvement of the channel at 
the mouth of the river. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $2,000. 

RIVER TAMASKA. 

The Yamaska rises in the County of Brome, and, after a course of over ninety 
miles, falls into the St. Lawrence at the head of Lake St. Peter. 

A contract has been entered into for the construction of a lift lock and dam at 
lie a Cardin, one and three-quarter miles below the village of St. Michel, and about 
four and a half miles from the mouth of the river. By the construction of these 
works, and dredging through the shoal below the lock, the river will be rendered 
navigable for vessels of moderate draught to Belle Point or Eapid de la Grosse Eoche, 
a distance of twenty miles. At the close of the fiscal year about one-sixth of the 
work had been completed. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $7,008.02. 

BERTHIER, (EN HAUT.) 

The village of Berthier, en haut is on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, forty- 
five miles north-east of Montreal, and opposite Sorel at the morfch of the Eichelieu 
Kiver. 

253 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 i 



In 1881, dredging was done here to give a depth of nine feet below low water 
<mark over the Yanasse, Church and Levecque Shoals opposite Berthier, to enable 
vessels to come to the wharves at the Village. 

Tatal expenditure since Confederation $4,340.32. 

CHENAL DO MOINE. 

The Cbenal du Moine, or " Monk's Channel," as it appears on Bayfield's Chart, is 
one of the channels of the St. Lawrence, about three miles below Sorel. 

Great damage has been done here in former years during the breaking up of the 
ice by its being swept over the low-lying farms along the shore. To obviate this, 
two ice piers, each 30 feet square, were built in 1880-81, and have so far answered 
their purpose very well. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,957.97. 

ILE AUX NOIX. 

He aux Noix is in the Kiver Bichelieu near the southern boundary of the 
Province. 

On this island the British Government, many years ago, erected Fort Lennox, 
which was transferred to the Province of Canada, in 1855, and used as a reformatory 
prison from 1858 to 1863. Access to the fort is had by a road from the public high- 
way at the village of St. Valentine to the river, and thence by ferry to the island. 
It being maintained that this road was the property of the Dominion, extensive 
repairs were made in 1880-81, to the bridge crossing a dry gully, which had become 
dangerous. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $838.67. 

RIVER RICHELIEU. 

The Kiver Richelieu flows into the St. Lawrence, on its southern side, at Sorel.] 
ibrty-8ve miles below Montreal. 

During the season of 1880-81 the channel was deepened below the lock at St. j 
Ours ; obstructions were removed above the Lock ; the entrance to the wharves 
St. Denio improved ; the channel cleared at Belceii, and the entrance to the Chamblyj 
canal deepened to 8 feet at low water. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $46,657.22. 

RIVER L'ASSOMPTION. 

The Eiver L'Assomption discharges into the St. Lawrence above the Village off 
Kepentigny, in the County of L'Assomption. 

At Charlemagne, at the mouth of the river, dredging was carried on in 1881 onj 
the boulder shoal off the steamboat wharf, and in making a cut to the mill channel, 
.giving 10 feet depth at low water. 

Totol expenditure wince Confederation, $5,714.55. 

LONOU* POINTE. 



Longue Pointe is in the County of Hochebga, six miles below Montreal, on 
north shore of the St. Lawrence, 

It having been found that obstructions existed in the channel of the roui 
used by the ferry steamer plying between Longue Pointe and the village of Boucher 
▼ille, in the County of Chambly, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, a dredg< 
was placed at work in May, 1882, for the purpose of giving 7 feet at low water ii 
the channel, and at the close of the fiscal year had removed 10,228 cubic yards o 
material. 

Total expenditure since Confederation $2,212.50. 

254 



i 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



MONTREAL. 

The port of Montreal is under charge of the Board of Harbour Commissioners, 
whose report on the deepening of the channel between Montreal and Quebec will be 
«und in Appendix No. 10. 

LAPRAIRIE. 

Laprairie is the chef lieu of the County of the same name, and is situated on the 
ftouthern shore of the St. Lawrence, seven miles above Montreal. 

In May, 1882, a dredge was placed at work to deepen to 7 f'eet!at low water around 
the front and sides of the public wharf, and was so engaged at the close of the fiscal 
year, having up to that time removed 1,725 cubic yards of material. 

Total expenditure since Confederation $417.23. 

CHATEAUGUAY RIVER. 

The Chateau guay Eiver runs through the whole length of the County of Chateau- 
guay and flows into Lake St. Louis. 

The entrance of the river (east of Sisters' Island) was improved by dredging in 
1876. Total expenditure since Confederation $3,283.79. 

4 BEAUHARNOIS. 

Beauharnois is the chef lieu of the County of the same name, and is situated on 
(the southern shore of Lake St. Louis, Kiver St. Lawrence, twenty miles above Montreal 

During the summer of 1881a dredge was at work here, deepening to 9 feet, 
j around the wharves, and the channel therefrom to the main channel of the river. 

Total expenditure since Confederation $6,772.96. 

MOORING PIERS. 

Prior to Confederation three mooring piers were built in the St. Lawrence for 
the convenience of steamers and other vessels navigating that river. The piers were 
located at the head of the Lachine Rapids, at the head of the Cascades and three miles 
bove the village of the Cedars, immediately above " La Chute anx Bouleaux." The 
piers were each 70 feet long by 20 wide and consisted of crib work filled with stone, 
their purpose being to aiford steamers and other vessels arriving at the head of a 
rapid during a fog or at night, a place to tie up. The cost of these piers was $8,859. 

Since Confederation these piers have been repaired and new piers built at Coteau 
Landing. 

See the Cedars, St. Dominique, St. Zotique, Coteau Landing for particulars. 

BACOT HAYES SHOAL. 

Bacot Hayes Shoal is on the south side of the St. Lawrence, about 2J miles below 
the village of the Cedars, in the County of Soulanges. 

This shoal is in the steamboat channel, and has been a great obstruction to 
navigation, as there was only 6^ feet depth of water at low water, and in the fall 
of the year, when the water is usually very low, steamers running the rapids, and 
drawing about 7 feet, were obliged to bring their engines to a full stop before ventur- 
ing to pass this dangerous place. 

During the season of 1881-82 operations were commenced and carried on for the 

purpose of opening a new channel about 200 feet to the northward of that hitherto 

used. This new channel will be 150 feet in width, and have a depth of S foet at the 

lowest stage of water, and steamboats will be able to navigate it with ease and safety 

ithout slowing down. At the close of the fiscal year, 1881-82, about two-thirds of 

255 



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A. 1883 



the work had been performed, and the remainder will be completed during the fiscal 
year 1882 83, 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $3,691.30. 

ST. TIMOTHYS. 

The village of St. Timothee is in the County of Beauharnois, on the south shore) 
of the St. Lawrence, at the head of the Cedars Bapids, and about nine miles above tht 
town of Beauharnois. 

Towards the close of the fiscal year, 1882, material was purchased for the con- 
struction of a landing pier at this place. The pier will consist of a block 100 feet by! 
24 feet, having from 6J to 7£ feet depth of water at low water along its front, and be) 
connected with the shore by a roadway 237 feet long and 12 feet wide. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $11.10. 



CEDARS 



Law- 



18 a village in the County of Soulanges, on the northern shore of the St. 
rence, thirty miles above Montreal. 

A landing pier was built here by the local authorities, and during the year 1881- 
82 it was reconstructed by the Department. The pier is I00by24,with an ice-breakerj 
15 feet in length at its upper end, and has a depth of 7£ feet at low water. The 
is connected with the shore by a bridge 55 by 15, and has on it a commodious stbi 
house . 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $3,761.01. 

ST. DOMINIQUE. 

The village of St. Dominique des Cedres is in the County of Soulanges, on the noj 
shore of the St. Lawrence, about thrty-two miles above Montreal, at the head of " ' 
Chute a Bouleaux." 

In 1856 a mooring pier for the convenience of steamers or vessels which may 
overtaken by night or fogs at the head of the rapids, was built at a cost of $2,953 . 

In 1880 this pier was rebuilt above the water line and connected with the shor< 
by a roadway 24 feet wide. The dimensions of the pier are 75 feet by 24 feet, an<" 
on its up stream side it has an ice-breaker. Depth of water at lowest water, 15 
along whole front of pier. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,952.74. 



COTEAU LANDING. 

Coteau Landing is in the County of Soulanges, opposite the entrance to Beau-j 
harnois Canal ; at the foot of Lake St. Francis, and the head of the Coteau Rapids. 

In 1871 a mooring pier was built at a distance of 800 feet from the shore ; and 
February, 1872, a contract was entered into for the enlargement of the pier and i1 
connection with the shore so that it may serve as a landing place for the 
steamers navigating the St. Lawrence and lakes. The pier was completed 
October, 1874. It is 24'^ feet in length by 24 foot wide, with an ice-breaker 30 feet 
long at its up stream end, and has a depth of 13 feet at low water along its outer fa< 
The connection with the shore is 12 feet wide, except for a length of 100 feet n< 
the outer end where it is 24 feet wide, to give vehicles going different ways room U 
cross each other. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation $11,461.88. 



ST. ZOTIQUE. 

St. Zotique is situated in the County of Soulanges, at the foot of Lake St. Franci 
three miles above Coteau Landing. 

256 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The mooring pier at Coteau Landing having been found to be too near the head 
)f the Coteau Rapids for the safety of rafts and steamers requiring to tie up, a sum of 
13,500 was placed in the Estimates, 1881-82, to erect a mooring pier at St. Zotique. The 
pier is intended to be 100 feet long by 24 feet wide, and to be placed about 1,200 feet 
Tom the shore in 12 feet at loiv water. During the winter of 1881-82 some of the 
naterial required was got out, but construction had not been commenced at the close 
A the fiscal year. The pier will be connected with the shore by a roadway 12 feet 
vide, carried on piers 12 by 8 feet deminsion. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,070.75. 

ST. ANICET. 

The village of St. Anicet is in the County of Huntingdon, on the right bank of 
[jake St. Francis, fifty-six miles south-west of Montreal. 

A landing pier was built here in 1862, at a cost of $1,920. It is 300 feet long; 
he width of tne 200 feet nearest the shore is 18 feet, and of the outer 100 feet, 34 feet. 

No expenditure has taken place since Confederation. 

RIVER A LA GRAISSE. 

The Eiver a la Graisse flows through the County of Vaudreuil and empties into 
be Ottawa on its southern side, about forty-five miles above Montreal. On it three 
ailes from the mouth, is situated the Town of Kigaud, the chef lieu of the County ; 
Dd during the season of 1880 and 1881, dredging was done in a portion of the Chan- 
el of the river so as to give a depth of 6 feet. 

Total expenditure since Contederation, $6,401.76. 

ST. PLACIDE. 

The village of St. Placide, in*the County of Two Mountains, is situated on the 
orthern bank of the Ottawa river, about eighteen miles above its junction with the 
t. Lawrence, and nine miles from St. Andrews. 

In 1879 work was commenced to dredge a channel, 1,000 feet in length by 50 
>et wide, and having a depth of 6 feet at low water, from the main channel of the 
ttawa to the public wharf at St. Placide, and also to dredge a turning basin 70 feet 
Jwidth. The work was not finished in 1879, and was resumed in 1882, and was in 
rogress at the end of the fiscal year. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,719.51. 









RIVER DU NORD. 



Eiver du Nord, or North Eiver, rises in the County of Terrebonne and flows 
irough the County of Argenteuil, emptying into the Ottawa at the head of the 
ake of Two Mountains. 

The Village of St. Andrew's is about three miles from the mouth of the river, 
uring the seasons of 1880 and 1881 a number of boulders were removed from the 
jd of the channel about half a mile below the village, leaving a depth of 4J- feet at 
w water over a width of 70 feet. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,627.51. 



RIVER DU LLEVRE. 



IThe Eiver du Lievre is a tributary of the Ottawa and falls into that river on 
i northern shore, in the County of Ottawa, about 18 miles below the City of 
itawa. 
During the summer of 1881 the channel of the river was deepened at Little Eapids, 
•out ten miles above the village of Buckingham, by blasting a reef which extends 
25? 
10 a— H 



16 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1888 



across the river at that point ; and also in removing boulders from the Long Rapidsi 
for the purpose of facilitating the navigation of the river by craft engaged in th<i 
transportation of phosphates. The depth of water available in the chanDel is novi 
3 feet at the lowest stage of water. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $4,316.89. 

RIVER SALMON. 

The River Salmon is a tributary of the Ottawa, into which it flows near Monl 
bello, seventy miles above Montreal. 

In September and October, 1880, the channel of the river was dredged to ob1 
a depth at 6 feet of low water. 

Total expenditure since Confederation $746.16. 

CALUMET. 

Calumet is on the north shore of the Ottawa River, about sixty miles below 
City of Ottawa, and sixty miles above Montreal. 

In July, 1880, dredging was done here to give 6 feet at low water, so as to alloj 
the entrance of the steamer plying to Hawkesbury, Ont., in connection with 
Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental Railway. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $1,16 1.90. 

RIVER GATINEAU. 

The Gatineau is one of the principal tributaries of the Ottawa, into which 
flows, on its northern side, below the City of Ottawa. 

During 1874 and L875, very extensive dredging was done. 

In the fall of 1881 the water was extremely low, and a passage for barges 
to be cut through the shoals in the channel near the railway bridge. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $39,264.17. 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



OTTAWA RIVER. 

Immediately below the Union Suspension Bridge there existed a small rod 
island, the top of which was removed some years ago to nearly the summer level 
the Ottawa, and this, during the season of freshets, became a submerged reef, whi» 
was a cause of much hindrance to navigation. 

During the extremely low water of 1881, the top of this reef was removed to 
average depth of about 3 feet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation for removing 
$4,933.19. 

l'orignal. 

The village of L'Orignal is on the south shore of the Ottawa River, about 
and a-half miles above the head of the Carillon and Grenville Canals at G-renville. 
is the capital of the United Counties of Prescott and Russell, and is sixty-six 
west of Montreal. 

A pier 554 feet in length and 24 feet wide was built prior to 1841 j and, in 1* 
and 1858 it was extended 800 feet by the municipal authorities, the Governing 
contributing $2,000. 

No expenditure since Confederation. 

25S 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



HAWKESBURY. 

Hawkesbury is on the southern side of the Ottawa River, in the County of 
Prescott, about 60 miles from Ottawa. 

During 1881-82 the channel from the rear of Grant's Point on the Ottawa 
to the village wharves was dredged to a depth of 6 feet at low water. 
L 4 Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $1,164.90. 

GANANOQUE.^ 

Gananoque is in the County of Leeds on the north shore of the St. Lawrence,, 
at the mouth of the Gananoque River. It is eighteen miles north-east of Kingston 
and thirty miles west of Brockville. 

In 1881 the sum of $245.17 was expended in dredging the Gananoque River so 
rs to admit the entrance of a lnrger class of vessels for grain freights. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $245.17. 

KINGSTON. 

Kingston is situated at the outlet of Lake Ontario, 172 miles west of Montreal, 
and is an important commercial centre. 

The work executed here by the Department consisted of dredging the Carrutbers 
ihoal, so as to obtain 13 feet at the lowest stage of water ; and was performed during 
the seasons of 1874-75-76. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, 814,814.40. 

PORTSMOUTH. 

Portsmouth is situated on the Bay of that name, two miles from Kingston. 
During the year 1881-82 a portion of the basin was dredged to a depth of 13 
:eet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $3,390.40. 

PICTON. 

Picton harbor is on the south side of the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario, thirty- 
;ix Miiles south-west of Kingston, and eight miles to the eastward of Belleville. 

Prior to Confederation, the Government expended $8,424 in dredging a channel 
• 140 feet wide, and having 9 feet at low water, from the wharves at the head of th& 
>ay to deep water outside. 

In 1874 the sum of $6,000 was expended in dredging the harbour ; and in 1878 

1879 a further sum of $5,684.60 was spent in removing the old pier at the outer 
imit of the harbor, in widening the entrance and to give a depth of 10 feet. Some 
irther dredging was also done in 1880 and 1882. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $13,487.85. 

a ofl NAPANEE. 

The town of Napanee is the commercial centre of the united Counties of Lennox 
d Addington, and is situated on the right bank of the River Napanee, about five 
ailes above its discharge into the Bay of Quinte, Lake Ontario. 

Several shoals obstruct the river, and, in 1861, the Department spent $1,078 in 
xcavating a channel half a mile in length to a depth of 9 feet, through a shoal over 
rhich there had previously been only 6 feet. 

In 1873-74 the sum of $4,999.73 was expended in dredging ; and in the year 
875-76 the sum of $14,027.07 was spent for the same purpose, of which sum the 
'ounties of Lennox and Addington contributed $2,000, and the Town of Napanee 
",000. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $19,026.80. 

254) 
10 a— 17J 



46 Victoria. 



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I 

A. 1883 



SHANONNVILLE — SALMON RIVER. 

Shannonville is situated on the Salmon Eiver which empties into the Bay o^ 
<Juinte, about nine miles from Belleville, and forty and a-half west of Kingston. 

The village is two miles from the mouth of the river, and the channel leading 
the wharf is deep, but the mouth of the river is obstructed by a bar composed of sane 
and sawdust. In 1874-75, the sum of $2,992.94 was expended in dredging this bar 
and in 1881-82, $1,088.43 was spent for the same purpose, a length of 1,700 feet by 
width of 40 feet being dredged to 8 feet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $4,906.4*7. (See page 
113 and 111.) 

BELLEVILLE. 

Belleville is the capital of the County of Hastings, and is situated at the mom 
<of the Eiver Moira, which flows into the Bay of Quinte, forty-three miles west 
Kingston, and 113 east of Toronto. 

The harbor is well sheltered, but was obstructed by several shoals, partly forme 
by the sawdust and mill refuse brought down by the river. Several attempts 
dredging were made by the municipality, and, in 1874, the Department expende 
$10,000 in continuing the work so commenced ; and, in 1875, and subsequent yearij 
up to 1882, further dredging was done, towards which the municipality contribut 
$3,000. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $22,688.24. 

TRENTON. 

Trenton is at the head of the Bay of Quinte, sixty miles above Kingston 
twelve from Belleville. 

During the seasons of 1878-79 and 1880 dredging operations were carried on hei| 
to obtain a channel 150 feet wide, having a depth of 10 feet at low water. In 1881- 
an old crib-work pier was removed from the river. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $6,418.54. 



CONSECON. 



Consecon is at the head of Weller's Bay, Lake Ontario, in the County of Prin«jl 
Edward. 

During the months of October and November, 1881, dredging was done on ti 
shoals obstructing the entrance to the harbour, affording only partial relief. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation $3,236.13. 



PRESQUILE. 



! 



The harbor is situated on the north shore of Lake Ontario, immediately abolw 
the peninsula of Prince Edward, and about seventy-eight miles above Kingston. 

The only expenditure made by the Government prior to Confederation was $65, 
for the placing of buoys to mark the entrance to the harbor. 

On the 9th of May, 1871, an Order in Council was passed accepting the transjffl 
from the Government of Ontario to the Dominion Government of this harbor, al 
providing that the sum of $10,000 be expended in improving it. 

In 1872 the work of dredging was commenced and completed in 1875, a chanijl 
varying from 220 feet to 160 feet in width, and having 12 feet of water, havijp 
been dredged through the shoal known as " The Middle Ground." 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $26,981.34. 

260 






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;46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



OOBOURG. 

The town of Cobourg is situated on Lake Ontario, about ninety-six miles west 
Kingston, and seventy-two miles east of Toronto. 

The work of forming a harbour here was commenced by a company organized by 
Act of Parliament passed in 1829. In 1842 the works were assumed by th© 
>vernment and held until the 27 th May, 1850, when they were sold to the Town 
)uncil of Cobourg for the sum $16,000. 

Prior to the Union of the Provinces in 1841, the Government had spent 
1,010*72 on this harbour; and after the Union the sum of $41,999.98 was advanced 
a perpetual'loan at 6 per cent, interest. 

At the time of Confederation, 186*7, the works consisted of two piers, the united 
igth of which was 2,047 feet. They were 190 feet apart at the entrance of the 
•hour and enclosed an area of about twelve and a-half acres of water, the depth at 

outer end of the east pier bei~g 14 feet, decreasing from 7 to 8 feet in the centre 
the basin. 

In 1873 a survey of the harbour was made and an agreement entered into with 

Harbour Commissioners for the improvement of the harbour, the Commissioners 
pay one third of the cost and the Government two thirds. Under this agreeirent 
contract wjw entered into in September, 1873, for the construction of a pier 1,500 
it long and 30 feet wide, from the foot of Hibernia street. The first contractors 
ling to do anything were relieved of their contract and the work given to other 
•ties who commenced it on the 15' h May, 1875, and completed in September, 1876. 
Le total expenditure was $79,569.68, of which the Harbour Commissioners 
misher) $25 507.49. 

In 1881-82 an arm 150 feet in length, in a south easterly direction was placed 
(er contract, but owing to the failure of the tontractor it had not been completed 
the close of the fiscal year. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $92,161.89. 

PORT HOPE. 



trafl 



Port Hope lies on the north shore of Lake Ontario, seven miles above Cobourg and 
102 miles above Kingston. 

In 18*9 the Port Hope Harbor and Wharf Company was incorporated; and in 
1832 the Company obtained a loan of £8.00^ from the Government In i 852 the 
Company so'd the harbor to the Town Council of Port Hope for 846.000, and by an 
A.ct of Parliament, passed in 1853, this sale was confirmed and the harbor vested in 
, Commission era acting as trustees for the ben-fit of the Town Conn il. By the Act 
P» 28 Vic, chap. 86, assented to 30th June, 1-64, authority was given to the Port Hope, 
Lindsay and Beaverton Railroad Company to acquire and hold this harbor. The 
tamount expended by the Government prior to Confederation was $58,680.26; and 
(the works consisted of two piers, the eastern extending 600 feet into the lake, and 
the western 4 : feet. The width at the entrance was 104 feet, and the pier« reached 
to 13 feet at low water ; but there was oAy a depth of 9 feet at the entrance to the 
harbor, which had an area of about three acres. 

In 1-75-76 the wester% pier was extended 150 feet on a width of 30 feet, and 
u the eastern pier 120 feet on a width of 40 feel, and the entrance dredged to 13 feet. 
During the summer of 1882 the work of extending the eastern pier 100 feet was com- 



'jj Ittenced, and a considerable quantity of dr< dging wan also done. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $30,401.69. 



NEWCASTLE. 



The harbour of Newcastle is in the County of Durham, on Lake; Ontario, forty- 
teven mites east of Toronto. 

| In 1878 the sum of $5,000 was granted to assist the Harbor Trust in dredging 
he harbour, t-o as to obtain a depth of 10 feet at low water. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $5, f )00. 

261 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



PORT DARLINGTON. 

Port Darlington is situated on Lake Ontario, two and a-half miles from Bow 
manville, and about forty miles east of Toronto. 

The harbor consists of two piers l,i80 feet and 1,620 feet in length respectively, 
which were built by the municipality. 

In 1875-76, the Government dredged the harbor to a depth often feet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $5,000. 

OSHAWA. 

The town of Oshawa is situated on Warren's Creek, in the County of Ontario, 
about thirty-five miles from Toronto. 

The harbour is on Lake Ontario, about a mile and a-half from the Grand Trui 
station, and here a pier was built by the municipality. 

In 1875 ihe Government granted $5,000 towards enlarging the pier and dredging 
the harbour, the Harbour Trust at the same time expending $9,968. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $5,000, 

WHITBY. 

The Harbor of Whitby, formerly Windsor Harbor, is on the north shore of LakJ 
Ontario, about 135 miles above Kingston and ihirty from Toronto. It is a miie 
tant from the Grand Trunk Railway, the Town of Whitby being two miles north 
the railway. 

The harbor is formed by a breakwater '3,042 feet in length, both ends touchii 
the shore and having on opening 250 feet wide at about 800 feet from the eastei 
end. The entrance is guarded by two parallel lines of ciib-work, built at rigl 
angles to the breakwater and extending the eastern 399 feet and the western Gf 
feet, into the lake. The area of the harbor is about 108 acre3, and the general deptj 
3 to 5 feet, the dredged portions having from 10 to 12 feet. 

The breakwater was built in 1843-46 and the harbor dredged 1847-50; the t< 
expenditure up to October of that year being $ 178,703.37. By an Order in (Jounc 
dated 13th August, 1850, the harbor, t >gether with the road leading from it to Li 
Scugog, was sold for $80,400 to the Port Whitby and Lake Scugog, Sim coe ai 
Huron Eoad Company. This Company made default in its payment, and the re 
and harbor were resumed by the Government on 19th May, 1863; and, on 21st Marc 
1864, the harbor was sold, to the Port Whitby Harbor Company for $35,150, and tl 
road to another company for $10,000. 

In 1874 a survey of tbe harbor was made, when it was reported that the bn 
water east of the entrance was entirely covered with a deposit of sand ; that much < 
the western side of the breakwater was similarly atfected, and that such portions 
it as were exposed weve in a decayed state throughout. The crib- work of the pieij 
under water was reported in good condition, but tbe superstructure of the west 
pier decayed. j 

No expenditure, beyond this survey, has been made by the Government sii 
Confederation. 

PICKERING. 

The harbour of Pickering, formerly known a-* Frenchman's Bay, is situated 01 
Lake Ontario, twenty-one miles east of Toronto. 

Two piern were built here some year-; ago, by the local authorities; and, in 181 
and 1879, Ihe Department exten led the western pier 60 feet, and dredged bctwe* 
the two piers so as to give a depth of 11 fee at low water. 

Total expenditure by the Department *ince Confederation, $4,999. 

263 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers ( \ T o, 10.) A. 1883 



TORONTO. 

The Harbor of Toronto is situated on the north shore of Lake Ontario, 333 miles 

rail south-west from Montreal, 161 miles from Kingston and 39 miles north by 

t from Hamilton. It is formed inside of the Island and has its principal entrance 

m the westward. 

An entrance from the eastward has existed for some years, but owing to its shal- 

ness is not used by steamers or mailing craft. 

At the north-east corner the Don empties, and the eastern side is bounded by 
rshy lands of many acres in extent, which separate it from Ash bridge's Bay. 
Since 1778 many physical changes have taken place in this harbor. 
Toronto Island, once a peninsula, was separated from the mainland in 1858, 
en a small breach was opened by the sea through the beach, gradually increasing, 
til at the present time it has a width of 1,800 feet when Lake Ontario is at its 
mal summer level. 
Many changes have taken place in the island. It had decreased in width and 
nt at the eastern end, and largely increased at the western, and to such an extent 
t for some years dredging has had to be carried on in the western channel to main- 
tain a width of 300 feet and a depth of 14 feet below zero of the gauge at the 
Queen's Wharf. 

Between the 1st July, 1874, and 30th June, 1880, the sum of $49,120.90 was 
ixpended principally in increasing the width and depth of the Queen's Wharf chan- 
nel, and to obtain a depth of 16 feet at low water, it was found to be necessary to 
biast in the solid ledge, and, to a certain extent, this was done. During 1880 and 
1881, dredging only was carried on, no further attempts having been made in the 
removal of rock. 

The question of the maintenance and improvement of this harbor having been 
brought prominently to the notice of the Hon. Minister; an examination was made 
in 1881, by Mr. James B. Eads, C.E., of St. Louis, Mo., and his report will be found 
n the Annual Eeport of the Department, 1881-82, app. page, 77. 

During the spring of 1882, the marshes bounding the eastern side of the harbor 
imd the whole southern shore of the island were damaged to such an extent as to 
necessitate almost a complete departure from the plans suggested by Mr. Eads for 
die preservation and protection of these portions, and works of an aggregate length 
)f 13,130 feet have been place under contract. 

The Harbor of Toronto is managed by a Board of Commissioners who collect 
ind retain all tolls collected on vessels using the port. 

Prior to Confederation, the sum of $22,965 had been expended in connection 
vith this harbor, and since then and up to 30th June, 1882, a further sum of $70,589.95 
las been expended. 

OAKVILLE. 

Oakville is on the north shore of Lake Ontario, in the County of Halton, nine- 
miles above Toronto. 
At the date of the Union of the Provinces, in 1841, the amount expended in 

ebentures on the two piers forming the harbour at Sixteen Mile Creek, was 

14,361.08, of which $10,000 bore interest at 6 per cent. 
In 1872-73 the sum of $497.46 was expended. 
Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $588.20. 

PORT DOVER. 

This harbor lies at the mouth of Patterson's Creek, on the north shore of Lake 
3rie, forty-nine miles above the upper entrance to the Welland Canal. 

On the 28th January, 1832, a Joint Stock Company was incorporated under the 

Iime of " The President, Directors and Company of the Port Dover Harbor," with 
capital of $20,000, for the purpose of constructing a harbor. The works were to 
262 



46 Victoria. 



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A. 1883 



be commenced in two, and completed in seven years. This time was extended b^ 
subsequent Acts of Parliament; a loan of £^,500 made to the Company, and authoril 
given to increase the capital to $ i 0,000 On 29th July, 1843, the works were trans-l 
ferred to the Government, and the piers were then completed and extended to dee] 
water. On 15th October, 1850, an Order in Council was passed, selling the harbor 
the " Port Dover Harbor Company," for the sum of $>50,400. In 1863, the harbor 
was again resumed by the Government, and further repaired and improved. 

The total expenditure by the Government up to Confederation was $44,391.61. 

The works consisted of two parallel piers 15 feet apart, and projecting into the 
lake about 1,000 feet, the channel between the piers having a depth of 10 feet. 

In 1868 and 1869 the superstructure of the piers was repaired ; and the mouth o^ 
the channel, which had filled up a little, was dredged out in 18*71. 

By an Order in Council passed 1st May, 1877, the harbor was sold to the Poi 
Dover and Lake Huron Kailway Company for $6,200. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $2,661.46. 

PORT BURWELL. 

Port But well lies on the north shore of Lake Brie, about ninety miles abov<| 
Port Colborne. It is sixty- two miles from Eondeau, and twenty-two miles 
Long Point. 

This harbor was formed by a Company, incorporated in 1832, which received i\ 
loan of £3,000 from the Government. In 1840, the works were surrendered to th( 
Government; and in I860, the deed of surrender was annulled. 

The only expenditure made by the Government after the Union of the Province 
was $546 for surveys. 

A thorough survey was made in 1874, up to which time the Compar y claimc 
that it had expended $100,100 on the harbor. 

In 1876-77, the sum of $10,055.37 was expended in repairing the breakwater 
and in dredging the harbor to a depth of 10 feet. 

PORT BRUCE. 

"QlTOPort Bruce is at the mouth of Cat Fish Creek, onjthe north shore of Lake Eru; 
100 miles above Port Colborne. 

This harbor was constructed by the Port Bruce Harbor Company, and consif 
of two piers, one 700 and the other 750 feet in length, placed 115 feet apart. 

Prior to Confederation, the Government spent $6,267.47 on this harbor. 

Nothing has been expended by the Department since Confederation. 



PORT STANLEY. 

Port Stanley is at the mouth of Kettle Creek, in the County of Elgin, ^n 
north shore of Lake Erie, about eighty-five miles from the entrance to the Weill 
Canal and Port Colborne, and twenty-four miles distant from the City of London b;j 
the London and Port Stanley Eailway, of which road it is the terminus. 

In 1827 an Act was passed by the Parliament of Upper Canada appointii 
Commissioners to make a harbour, and appropriating £3,000 for the purpose ; whic 
sum was further sapplemented by grants of £3,500 and £2,000. After the Union 
the Provinces very extensive repairs and improvements were made. The total si 
expended up to Confederation amounting to $230,531.88. By an Order in Coi 
dated 1st September, 1859, the harbour was transferred to the London and P< 
Stanley Eailway Company, on condition that the tolls collected should be applied 
the maintenance of the works. 

In 1870, when an extensive survey of the harbour was made, the works consist 
of two lines of piers placed 86 feet apart at the outer and 82 feet apart at the inn( 
end. The western pier was 1,456 feet in length, with a width of 20 feet for 548 fe; 

264 



46 Victoria. 



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A. 1883 






of the shore end, and 30 wide for the remainder of its length. The eastern pier 
was 1,150 feet in length, and. 30 feet wide. From the inner side of the western pier 
a docking, 11 J feet in width, was continued on the same line northward for 882 feet, 
in which there was a recess HO feet long by 53 feet deep. This docking formed the 
west side of the harbour. From the inner end of the eastern pier a lino of pile- 
docking formed the eastern side of the harbour. The inner basin was about 850 feet 
long, by an average width of 280 .feet containing nearly five and a-half acres, a small 
portion of which had a depth of from 7 to 11 feet; but the greater part — over four 
acres— had only a depth of from 1 to 5 feet. 

In 18*76 and 1877 an extension was built to the western pier 85 feet in length by 
30 feet wide, at a cost of $8,158 ; and in 1882 the outer end. of this pier, which had 
settled, was raised to its original height, at a cost of $600, lor the purpose of placing 
i lighthouse on it. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $8,758.00. 



RONDEAU. 

Pins, on the north shore of Lake Erie, 140 



aux 



Eondeau is situated at Pointe 
I liles above Port Colborne. 

Pointe aux Pins projects into the lake, and encloses a natural basin of above 6,000 

ires in extent. The communication between the basin and the lake is over a sand 

nk 120 feet broad, some parts of which are above the level of the water. In 1844 

breakwater was built here by the Government, and in 1851 the harbour was sold to 

e Eondeau Harbour Company for $8,000, on condition that the works should be 

pt in an efficient state of repair, but this stipulation being wholly neglected 

ssession was resumed by the Government on 2oth July, 1856, when the works 

re repaired . 

The total expenditure up to Confederation being $74,737.70. 

In 1869 a survey was made with a view to establishing a harbor of refuge, when all 

thi works, with the exception of the eastern breakwater, were found to be in a 

rupous cocdition; the rapid current had scoured out the channel between the 

ance piers to a depth of from 17 to 22 feet, undermining the piers and causing- 

paii of them to fall inwards, while about 350 feet of the outer ends of both piers had 

entrely disappeared. 

tin January, 1871, a contract was signed for building the piers, enlarging the 

ohaibel deepening the basin, and other works required for a harbor of refuge; and 

the svork was continued for the next four years, the amount expended being 

65.52. The works consisted of two parallel piers, 783 feet in length, 250 feet 

placed north and south, having a depth of 15 feet of water be! ween them ; a 

ater 225 feet in length, and dredging an area of ten acres in the inner basin 

pth of 15 feet. 

1877 an examination was made of the openings caused by severe storms in the- 
nks protecting the harbor, when it was found that although the depth of 
water la the channel had not decreased, the inner basin had been partly filled up by 
sand clrried in through the breaches in the bank. 

1^ 1881 a contract was entered into for the construction of 2,000 feet of pile pro- 
tectiotwork on the beach to the westward of the entrance which was not completed at 
the ed of the fiscal year, the expenditure to that time being $11,529.96. The work 
so fartlone has been highly successful, for not only have the breaches through the 
sand each become closed, but the beach itself has formed on the lake side for a 
distare varying from 50 to 100 feet beyond the former line of high water. During 
the jjar, 1881-82, the sum of $3,015 was expended in opening a channel into and 
throulh Mill Creek. 

mal expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $197,890.76. 

RIVER DETROIT. 

Tie Lime Kiln Shoal,Eiver Detroit, which extends over a length of 900 f^et, below 
the Caada Southern Eailway Dock, at Amherstburg, consists of out crops of rocks? 

265 



I181f 
apah 



to a 



sand 



4G Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



and deposits of boulders. This shoal is in Canadian waters and in the main channel 
of the river. The shallow spots vary from 12*5 feet upwards at low water. In the 
summer- of 1876, $7,260.32 were expended in removing much of the rock obstructions. 
Total expenditure since Confederation, $7,260.32. 

RIVER THAMES. 

The Elver Thames flows through, the fertile western peninsula formed by Lakes I 
Erie and Huron, and after a course of about 160 miles empties itseif into Lake St. j 
Clair. It has several flourishing villages on its banks, and the Town cf Chatham anc 
City of London, The river is shallow, and only available for vessels of very light 
draught as far as London ; but to Chatham a channel has been dredged, having 
depth of 11 feet. This work was performed in 1871, 1873-74, 1876, 1879 and 1880. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $18,828.31. 

RIVER SYDENHAM. 

The River Syndenham discharges into Mitchell's Bay, Lake St. Claire. iJ 
1875-76, a channel, 50 feet in width and 10 feet in depth, was dredged from the Tow:| 
of Dresden to Simpson's Bend, a distance of 6 miles. Below the latter point 
Mitched's Bay, the navigation is uninterrupted. The Government dredge "Chi 
lenge " performed the work. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $8,265.16. 

BAYFIELD. 

The village of Bayfield, is situated at the mouth of the river of the same nanej 
which empties into Lake Huron, twelve miles south of Goderk-h. 

The harbor as originally formed by the municipality, consisted of two pi«fiS,| 
618 and 620 feet in length, 200 feet apart at the renewed part, and 330 feet apar; 
the inner or land end. in 1874, an appropriation of $34,000 was made by Parlianei 
for the improvement of this harbor; the municipality of Stanley contribuingj 
$10,000. The work was placed under contract in November, 1874, and proceeded! 
with during the seasons of 1875-76 and 1877 ; and some expenditure for dredging 
since been made. 

The improvements consist of a prolongation of the northern pier, 105 fe>t 
the outer side, with an arm of 156 feet, turned to the south-west ; of a pier oi tl 
south side generally parallel to the main line of the opposite pier 180 feet dstant 
from it, being 553 feet in length, with a return to the coast line of 153 feet. M th( 
crib wo» i; is 30 feet wide. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $61,517.55. 

QODERICH. 



Goderich is situatcd'at the mouth of the Eiver Maitland on tho'east coast c Lai 
Huron, sixty-eight miles from Sarnia. It is the terminus of the Buffalo Branclof tl 
Grand Trunk Kailway, and is a place of considerable importance, partly on acount 
of the large deposits of salt found in its vicinity. 

r J he construction of a harbour at this place was first undertaken, in 185, bj 
the Canada Company, who held the right under a lease from the Crow, but 
although a considerable expenditure was made on the works, they were allo T ed 
fall into decay. In 1859, the Canada Company transferred their claims n th< 
harbour to the Buffalo and Lake Huron Eailway Company (now part of thcGranc 
Trunk system), who, in 1862, were granted a new lease from the Crown, oneof th< 
conditions of which was that the Company should make and maintain a hrbot 
sufficient to accommodate the largest class of vessels navigating Lake Huron. (Jnd< 

266 



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A. 1883 



i;his lease the Company erected extensive harbour works and established a lino of 
>pellers to Chicago. 
"When it was determined by the Government to establish harbours of refuge on 
:e Huron, (ioderich was one of the points selected as most suitable, and a survey 
is made and plans adopted for creating a large and safe harbour. ^(See Annual 
)ort for 1810, Appendix 11, pages 40 and 44.) The plan adopted may be briefly 
>lained as that of changing the entrance to the harbour by cutting a new channel 
>ugh the beach and protecting it by crib work, built out to a depth of 17 feet at 
water; of considerably increasing the area of the harbour, by dredging; and of 
rerting the channel of the River Maitland by the erection of an artificai bank, so 
it the river should discharge into Lake Huron through the north beach and not 
into the harbour at all. 

These works were commenced in 18*72 and completed in 1817, the total cost 
ing $465,715 81. In 1881 and 1«82 dredging to the extent of $1,748 was done, 
in 1882, $2,387.06 was spent in repairs and dredging, and in protection works 
the beach between the northern pier and the breakwater, which was being gradu- 
ly washed away. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $471,531.16. 

POUT ALBERT, 

Port Albert is situated on the eastern shore of Lake Huron, about nine miles 

:th of Goderich, at the mouth of Nine Mile Creek. 

A small pier was constructed here by the municipal authorities, and in 1875 the 

mrtrnent expended $6,000 in building an arm to this pier 50 feet in length, and 

constructing a small breakwater of cribwork, 75 feet long, on the south side of the 

)k, to retain any deposit the lake may cast up. 

In 1881 and 1882 a row of close piling 30»> feet in length was driven from the 
jtern corner of the pier eastward ly, and the basin so formed dredged to a depth of 
LOfeet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $9,521.31. 

KINCARDINE. 



Kincardine is on the eastern coast of Lake Huron, thirty-one miles north of 

lerich, at the mouth of the Penetangore Eiver. 

In 1856 two parallel lines of piers were built, 100 feet apart, the northern pier 

sing 540 feet in length and the southern one 290 feet. The cost to the Department 

to Confederation was $19,044. In 1868 the sum of $4.50J was granted to assist 

municipality in completing the southern pier. A considerable sum was also ex- 

)ded by the municipality in improving the harbour, the amount being placed at 

ibout $23 000. (See Annual Report, 18 ,0, page 40.) 

In 1869 a e-urveyof the harbour was made wnenit was found that the depth of water 

iter the entrance piers was from. 7 to 10 feet, except for a short distance within the 

roter end of the south pier, where there was only from 5 to 7 feet. The depth in the 

nsin varied from 7 to 10 feet. In 1872 dredging wan cemmenced and was continued 

iti! 1877, w T hen the whole of the inner basin, about four acres in extent, had been 

Iged to 12 feet and the entrance to 13 feet. Since then further dredging has 

jn done, giving 14 feet in the basin and 15 feet at the entrance. The entrance 

:*s have been considerably extended, the direction changed and the entrance 

idened from 130 feet to 200 feet so as to afford greater facility for entering the 

*bour. In 1876 the wharf was damaged by a storm and this has been repaired and 

superstructure raised. In November, 1881, a contract was let for the c nstruc- 

>n of 790 feet of pile protection work on the south side of the southern pier ; and 

*t the close of the fiscal year the work was half completed. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $78,049.68. 

267 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



'INVERHURON. 

Inrorhuron is on the eastern coast of Lake Huron, in the County of Bruce, 
twenty-three miles from Southampton ard 114 miles above Sarnia. 

In 1856-77 a pier 450 feet in length, having 16 feet of water at its outer end, was 
built by the Government, the total expenditure up to Confederation being $15,125. 
This pier was maintained the municipality and some addition made to its 
length, the cost of which has not been ascertained. 

This place was surveyed in 1869, with a view to forming a harbor of refuge; 
but the work was never undertaken. (See Annual Eeportfor 18*70, pages 38 and 45.) 

In 1^74 75 the old pier was very thoroughly repaired, at a cost of $6,093.60; and, 
in 1881, the sum of $158.58 was expended in renewing 300 feet of the covering of 
the pier and replacing 200 feet of the waling, which had been destroyed by wear 
and tear. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $6,093.60. 



PORT ELGIN. 

Port Elgin is in the County of Bruce, on the east coast of Lake Huron, four mil* 
from Southampton and twenty-four from Kincardine. 

In l v 57 ! h ■ Government granted $4,0 i0 to assist a private company in construct 
ing a pier 3^0 feet in length, to 13 feet water. 

For the purpose of opening a harb >r of refuge, the construction of a pier 600 fe« 
in length wa- commenced during: the summer of 1882, and about one-eighto. of it wi 
competed at the close of the fisc.il y< ar. 

Towards the construction ot this work the village of Port Elgin has contribul 
$5,000. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $3,180.97. 

SOUTHAMPTON. 

Southampton is situated at the mouth < f the Saugeen River on the east coast 
Lake Huioo, 143 miles above Sarnia. 

Prior to Confederation the bum of $10, '.'36.39 was granted towards erecting 
"breakwater to prevent the formation of a bar across the mouth of the r.ver. In U6!i 
a further grant < f $3,500 was made for e \ nd ng the work, and in 1871 an addition* 
son) ot £ ,500 aras expended. In . 8S1 8 i, ihe sum of S2,5 >9.60 was expended i]| 
restori g a length of 700 feet of the super t ucture, and flooring of the west bref" 
w»te h la -rig 500 cubic t'eet of s'on- on the lake -ideofthis breakwater at il 
junction wi'h Chantry Island, and in the construction of a small breakwater 155 U 
in length o polite the lighthouse, in ord w > protect the Island at that point. 

To al expenditure by th,e Department »-ince Confederation, $8,559,60. 

CHANTRY ISLAND. 

Chantry Island is a small rocky island about half a mile long, lying one 
three fourth miles west, south-west from the mouth of the Saugeen Uiver, on the 
of Lake Huron, about. 133 miles above 'he toot of the lake at Sarnia. 

In 18 9, the Government erected a tigl thouse on this island, and, in 1856, 
tereakwater n'50 long, and hiving 18 feet, of water at its outer end was construct 
This work w<is raised in 1865. 

The t »tal expenditure p ior to Confe.ieri tion, was $31,910.95. 

In 1869, the question of establishing h irbours of refuge along the coasts of Lai 
Huron and K ie having been considered by the Government, the Chief Engineer 
the L) paitment was instructed to investigate the subject, and cause surveys to be mi 
with a vi> w to determining where these harbours should be located. 

268 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



On 20th January, 18*70, Mr. Page, the Chief Engineer, made his Eeport, (See 
nual Eeport for 1870, Appendix 11, pages 25 to 62) and recommended Chantry 
and as one of the best sites for a harbour of refuge. 
A contract was signed in January, 1871, and work commenced that season, and 
pleted in 1877. 

The works consist of a breakwater 1,600 feet long, extending in an easterly 
ection from the old breakwater at the northern end of the island. A breakwater 
00 feet long, on a curved line from the mainland, to within 400 feet of the end of 
e pier taken out from the island, and a landing pier has been built in the inner 
rbour, where a quantity of boulder stone has been removed from a shoal adjoining 
e anchorage ground. A beacon, an octangular structure of timber 50 feet across, 
led up 40 feet above water line, has been placed in 16 feet of water on the extreme 
point of the shoal, running south-west from the island. The breakwaters are built 
of crib work rilled with stone, and there is a talus of stone on each side where the 
depth is greater than 12 feet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $235,469.81. 

TOBERMORY. 

The Harbor of Tobermory is situate at the extreme northern end of the County 
of Bruce , on the channel leading from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay. 

It is a large and safe natural harbor of refuge, and the sum of $349.20 was spent 
during the fiscal year, 1881-82, in placing ring bolts in the rocky sides of the harbor 
[for the purpose of mooring and protecting vessels. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $349.20. 

BIG BAY. 

Big Bay is on Georgian Bay, about fifteen miles north of Owen Sound Harbor. 

The pier is situated on Lot 38, Colpoy's Eange, Township of North Keppel. It 
was constructed in 1877, by the municipality, at a cost of $993, towards which the 
Government granted $400, the balance being paid by the municipality. The pier 
was then 335 feet long, and reached to 6J feet depth at low water. In 1881, the pier 
was extended 117 feet into lljfeet of water, at a cost of $1,121.41 of which the Gov- 
ernment paid $500. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $900.00. 

OWEN SOUND. 

The town of Owen Sound is situated on the Sydenham Eiver, which flows into 
le head of Owen Sound, an arm of the Georgian Bay. The town is the terminus of 
le Toronto, Grey and Bruce Eailway, and the centre of an extensive agricultural 
" rtrict. 

Prior to Confederation, the harbour was formed by the municipality of Owen 
)und, and in 1856 and 1866, grants were made by the Government to assist in improv- 
ing the channel of the Sydenham, from its mouth up to the town of Owen Sound, 
"'tese grants amounted to $1,300. 

In 1874, a survey of the river was made, with a view to improving the channel ; 
id, in 1874 and 1875, the sum of $10,367.55 was expended by the Department in 
'ring a generally straight channel, 150 feet wide, from the wharf at the foot of 
W street to the outer light, a distance of three-quarters of a mile. The depth of 
iter obtained was ten feet at low water. In 1876 and 1877, a channel was dredged 
>m the dry dock to a short distance outside of the outer light, a length of about 2,000 
)i. The channel was about 150 feet wide, and had a depth of twelve feet. Cost, 
>,589.77. In 1879, a further sum of $1,951.30 was spent in dredging a narrow 
lannel, 65 feet wide to a depth of 14 feet. 

269 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The enlarging trade of the place demanding' greater harbour accommodation 
and the increased size of the steamers navigating the lakes requiring a greater depth 
of water in the harbours, it was decided to make very considerable improvements in 
the harbour, and the town of Owen Sound agreed to contribute $13,000 towards the 
cost. These works consist of the structure of two parallel rows of pile work, 200 
feet apart, extending from the shore a distance of 600 feet, together with about 1,000 
feet of bank protection, and the dredging of the channel of the River Sydenham, from 
the upper end of the steamboat wharf to its mouth, and from thence to fourteen feet 
at low water, a total distance of 5,000 feet. Further deepening of the channel wag 
done during the early part of 1882. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, ^56,*781.17. 

MEAFORD. 



Meaford is an incorporated town in the County of Grey. It is situated on thi 
Georgian Bay, eighteen miles west of Collingwood and twenty to the eastward oi 
Owen Sound. 

Prior to Confederation a pier 500 feet long, and having 14 feet of water at ite 
outer end, was built by the local authorities, aided by a grant of $6,000 from th 
Government. 

This pier, which is on the west bank of the Big Head River, was extended 
during 1874 and 1875 160 feet, and an arm 200 feet long was built in a north-easterly 
direction, in order to afford protection against north-east winds. A breakwater 410» 
feet long was also built on the east side of the river. The cost of these works wad 
$22,899.29, of which three-fifths was paid by the Government and two-fifths by th<j 
Municipality of St. Vincent. 

In 1878 the sum of $250 was expended in dredging ; and in 1880 and 1881] 
$2,564.94 was spent by the Department in dredging to 12 feet inside the western pier, 
deepening the channel to the inner harbor, and dredging a portion of the innei 
harbor, which had been enlarged by the local authorities, to 11 feet. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation $25,714.13. 

THORNBURY. 

Thornbury is situated at the mouth of Beaver River, which empties intoGeorgu 
Bay, in the County of Grey, thirteen miles from Collingwood. 

Some years ago a pier was constructed by the residents of the locality, but ij 
was allowed to fall out of repair and become useless. 

During the Session of 1881, the sum of $7,000 was voted by Parliament 
reconstruct the pier and dredge a basin 100 feet in width to 10 feet in depth, on il 
eastern side. This grant was supplemented by the sum of $7,000, furnished by th< 
Town of Thornbury, and the work was placed under contract. At the close of thi 
fiscal year, 30th June, 1882, about one-fifth of the work had been completed. 

Total expenditure by this Department since Confederation, $3,469.98. 

COLLINGWOOD. 



Collingwood is situated on Nottawasaga Bay, on the southern shore of th 
Georgian Bay, and is an important town on account of its being the terminus of th< 
Northern and Hamilton and North- Western Railways . It is ninety-four miles fron 
Toronto, and there is an extensive trade in grain and lumber. 

Prior to Confederation, a pier and lighthouse was erected here ; but it was 
pletely swept away by a storm in 1872. 

In August, 1873, the work of re-construction was commenced and was compl 
in 1874, at a cost of $57,468.43, one-half of which was paid by the Department, one 
quarter by the Northern Railway Company, and one-quarter by the Town of Colling 
wood. 

270 







46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



I 



The works consist of a breakwater and pier head 700 feet in length, and a light- 
house. The work is of unusual strength. The front wall is built double up to water 
line, commencing 24 feet at the base; the cribs recede to 19 feet 6 inches at water- 
jline, the point where the slope commences, to 5 feet below water line, and the angle 
is protected by boiler plate. The portion above water is carried up to the height of 
jlix feet, terminating at 12 feet 6 inches in width. Each angle is protected by boiler 
jplate, three-eights of an inch thick, spiked down by 12£ inch spikes. There are, 
{therefore, three ranges of iron on the point. A centre wall of 12 inch square timber 
jis carried up perpendicular to the top throughout the whole structure. The eastern 
[or deep water end, finishes in a broad pier head 60 feet long by 80 feet wide, on which 
a lighthouse has been erected. This pier head as well as the body of the breakwater, 
is covered with three inch white oak plank, 

The depth of water in the harbour was 11 feet; but as the size of the vessels 
iaavigating Lake Superior has increased, this depth was found insufficient, and during 
ithe seasons of 1879, and following years, dredging was commenced for the purpose of 
increasing the depth to 14 feet at low water. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $84,636.32. 

PENETANGUISHENE. 

Penetanu:uishene is situated on the north of the eastern peninsula in Georgian 
Bay, formed between Nottawassaga Bay and the waters of the Severn. 

During the summer of 1880, dredging was done at the western point, south of 
the Eeformatory wharf, and to the north of the wharves at the village so as to give 
depth of 16 feet in the channel. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $2,624.07 . 

BRUCE MINES. 

Bruce mines is situated on the northern shore of Lake Huron, in the County of 
AJgoma, forth-five miles below Sault Ste Marie.- 

Between July and September, 1881, a channel with 14 feet of water was dredged 
to the public wharf. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation $1,581.53. 

LITTLE CURRENT. 

Little Current is the passage between Cloche Island and the Great Manitoulin 
[sland,and is on the direct route to Sault Ste. Marie from ports on the Georgian Bay. 
It is about 140 miles from Collingwoed. 

Owing to the existence of a rocky ledge the navigable channel was much nar- 
rowed and intricate of navigation,so much so that deeply laden vessels were obliged to 
make the outside passage through Lake Huron, which in the fall of the year is at- 
tended with much danger. 

In May, 1881, the work of removing the rocky ledge in the channel was com- 
tnenced,and during the season 3,752 cubic yards were blasted and removed. This rock 
vras deposited between Manitoulin and Spider Islands and has had the effect of re- 
lucing the current in the steamboat channel ; the water which formerly flowed be- 
tween these islands now runs to the north-east of Spider Island where the channel is 
tfide and deep. 

About 10,000 yards of rock remain to be removed from the Channel of Little 
Current, and when the removal is completed there will be a depth of 17 feet in the 
•hannel. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $12,415.25. 

NEEBISH RAPIDS. 

The Neebish Rapids are in Algoma County, at the foot of Lake George, twenty- 
our miles from Sault Ste. Marie, and midway between Bruce Mines and the Sault. 

271 



16 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The rapids are caused by an outcrop of rock and boulders, and previous to an^ 
improvements being made their navigation was considered very dangerous. 

In July, 1876, work was commenced here with a view to making a channel 20( 
feet wide with a depth of 14| feet throughout the length of the rapids, 1,600 feet,! 
and the work has since been continued annually. 

An examination of these rapids was made in 1880. when it was discovered that 
the best and most easily improved channel is on the American side of the river. Ii 
1881 the American Engineers examined this channel, the result being that the} 
placed an ordinary dredge at work, and for less than $10,000 procured a depth of' 
over 16 feet through obstructions consisting entirely of gravel and small stone. Ncj 
further expenditure at this place will be requisite on the part of the Dominion, and! 
it is probable that in a few years this channel may be abandoned for the more direct 
one through Hay Lake. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $36,1*71.85. 

SAULT STE. MARIE. 

Sault Ste. Marie is the County Town of the County of Algoma, and is o: 
St. Mary's Strait, 350 miles north-west of Collingwood. 

In 1879, dredging was done at the wharf, to permit steamers drawing 10 feet tc 
come up to it. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $419.01. 

RIVER KAMINISTIQUIA. 

The Kaministiquia Eiver empties into Thunder Bay. 

In the bay, a shoal 4,000 feet in width extends from the mouth of the river, anc 
in 1876, &c, a channel 44 feet in width, for 800 and 1,000 feet, respectively, at eaclj 
end, and 22 feet wide over the central portion was cut through it to a depth of 1.' 
feet ; but, as might be expected, it has filled up to a certain extent, as the sounding 
taken in 1880 showed a depth of only 9 feet. In the river a width of 50 feet to the samt 
depth was cut through the shallow water below the Hudson Bay Fort, and a througf 
cut of 22 feet was made on the shoal, 800 feet long, opposite the mill ; a second c9 
at this spot was left incomplete, about 300 feet in the centre not having beei 
dredged. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $18,881.82, of whicl 
$12,882.57 are charged to Pacific Eailway. 



PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 



ASSINIBOINE RIVER. 

The Assiniboine is a tributary of the Eed Eiver into which it flows at the Citj 
of Winnipeg. It is a shallow river, but is navigable by vessels of very light draughi 
as far as Port Ellice. 

In 1880 a number of boulders, which obstructed navigation, were removed; anc 
two wing dams, 240 and 215 feet in length respectively, were built on the south sid< 
of the river at Silver Heights five and a half miles from Winnipeg. 

Total amount expended by the Department since Confederation, $4,178.13. 

RED RIVER. 

The Eed Eiver rises in the western portion of the State of Minnesota, and afte:j 
a course of about 525 miles crosses the boundary into Manitoba at Emerson, ai 
follows a very tortuous course of aboufc 140 miles, finally discharging into Lak«J 

272 



Il6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Winnipeg. It is navigable for vessels of light draught for the whole of its course 
through Manitoba and for a portion of itK course through the United States. 

Near the town of St. Andrews there are some rapids which were partly 
bbstructed < ;. several large boulders, to the serious interference with navigation. 
Chese boulders were removed during the seasons of 1873 and 1874, and other 
mprovements made to the navigation of the river. 

Total expenditure since Confederation, $6,234.90. 



PROVINCE OF BRITIiH COLUMBIA. 



n 



OOWICHAN RIVER. 

The Cowichan River and Lake are on Vancouver Island, about thirty-five miles 
'rom Victoria. 

The lake is about twenty-two miles long and twenty-two miles from the mouth 
f the river, which latter is for nearly half its course very rapid. The upper portion 
fthe river and the shores of the lake are covered with magnificent timber and 
xtensive lumbering operations are carried on. The channel of the river was 
ery seriously obstructed by drift piles of fallen timber, and in June, 1873, a contract 
ras entered into for removing these obstructions so as to permit of the free passage 
f logs. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $1,469.8^. 

OOURTENAT RIVER. 



The Courtenay, or Comox Xiiver, is situated on Vancouver Island, 129 miles 
rom Victoria. 

The channel of the river is obstructed by snags, and in November, 1S81, an 
ttempt was made to remove these obstructions, but without success, the shallowness 
the channel, only eight foet at high water, its crookedness and the strong 
urrent preventing the steamer from towing the fallen timber, which constitutes the 
bfltructions, out to sea, as had been intended. Hon. Mr. Trutch, Government Agent 
i British Columbia, who personally superintended the operations, expresses the 
pinion that any further attempt would be equally futile. 

Total expenditure by the Department since Confederation, $474.65. 

PRASER RIVER. 

The Fraser is the mo3t important river in British Columbia, flowing entirely 

rough that Province. Its main branch rises in the Eocky Mountains, and it is fed 

7 many tributaries, some of them very large. It was discovered by Sir Alexander 

>>i. r : IcKenzie,in 1793, and hy him named the Ta-cout-she Lesse, or Kiver of the Taculiy 

ation. It was subsequently, in 1808, navigated to its mouth by Mr. Simon Fraser, 

\,i H)m whom it takes its present name. The Towns of New Westminster and Yale 

situated on the river, and it is navigable for steamers up to the latter place, about 

miles from its mouth. 

3 

Port Sister Bock.— -This rock, which wa3 situated between Hope and Yale, four 
files from the former and eleven from the latter, was a serious hindrance to naviga- 
on, and was removed in 1872-73 so as to leave a depth of from 10 to 12 feet at high 
rater. 



Saw Mill Bifle Bock. — This rook was removed in 1873, at a cost of $700. 

273 
10 a— 18 



16 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Survey. — In 18*74 a very full survey of the river between Big Bar and Sod* 
Creek, a distance of 120 miles, was made with a view to its improvement for naviga- 
tion, and an estimate made of the probable cost, amounting to $100,000, without 
taking into account the obstructions at Big Bar Canyon. 

Cottonwood Canyon, on the Upper Fraser, is situated about twenty miles north of 
Quesnello mouth, and its navigation is obstructed by numerous rocks and boulders. 
The Canyon is about 500 yards long, and it is estimated that if its channel was 
cleared, the Fraser would be rendered navigable for an additional distance of sixty 
miles, thus giving a navigable stretch of 140 miles from Soda Creek and eighty miles 
from Quesnelle mouth. At the Session of 1879 the sum of $10,000 was voted for 
improving the navigation of this section, and in October the work of blasting was 
commenced and prosecuted until tbe Canyon was closed by ice, at which timo 564 
cubic yards had been blasted at a cost of $9,1)97, of which about $3,250 was expended 
for plant, making the cost of blasting, exclusive of plant, about $12 per cubic yard. 
Mr. Pearse, the Resident Engineer, in his Keport, dated 8th March, 1880, estimates 
that 2,227 cubic yards of rock remain to be blasted in order to give a channel avail- 
able for light draught steamers at low water; and that the cost of removal would be 
$21,420. No further work has been done. 

Dredging. — The main impediments to navigation, from the Straits of Georgia to 
New Westminster consist in the tortuousness and shallowness of the channel through 
the sands at the mouth of the Fraser, and in tde changes which it undergoes after 
each year's freshet. During the summer of 1880 dredging operations were carried 
on at the Woodward Slough, and a channel opened 2,000 feet long by 250 feet wide, 
having a depth of water at the lowest tide of 13 feet in the shallowest places, and at 
ordinary high tide 21 feet. This new channel reduces the distance between New 
Westminster and the mouth of the Fraser by about two miles. 

Total expenditure by the Department on Fraser River improvements since Con- 
federation, $29,566.22. 

NAAS RIVER. 

The Naas River rises near the frontier of Alaska and flows south into the Skeena.1 
The channel of the river being greatly obstructed by snags, navigation isj 
thereby rendered both difficult and dangerous. An appropriation was made for the 
purpose of removing these obstructions and the work entrusted to Captain H. B. 
Croasdaile, a resident of Naas Eiver, who reports, under date of 18th November, 1881, 
that most of the snags had been removed and a channel buoyed, and that " for the) 
first time in its history the ordinary coasting steamers have been making trips up it] 
for some fourteen miles, from April to October, and have only touched snags on one 
or two occasions. A further appropriation to continue the work has been made, but 
no report had been received from Captain Croasdaile up to the close of the fiscal 
year. 

Total amount expended by the Department since Confederation, $990.84. 

SKEENA RIVER. 

The Skeena, or Simpson River, rises in Lake Connolly, on the Peak Mountains, 
and runs westward into the Pacific at the head of Observatory Inlet, forming for 
portion of its course the boundary between Alaska and British Columbia. It is navi- 
gable for about 100 miles for light draught steamers, and has several exten- 
sive salmon canneries on its banks. The channel is, however, greatly obstructed by] 
snags, in the shape of fallen trees, which have become imbedded in the sand, and anj 
appropriation of $1,500 has been made for the purpose of removing these obstructions, 
and the performance of the work entrusted to Mr. J. H. Turner, but up to the close 
the fiscal year, 1882, no report had been received from him. 

2Y4 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



VICTORIA HARBOR. 

Victoria, the capital of British Columbia, ia situated at the south-eastern 
extremity of Vancouver Island, and is the political and commercial centre of the 
British possesses on the Pacific coast. 

The harbor is difficult of access, shallow, and is obstructed by several rocks. It 
is only divided by a narrow strip of land from JEsquimault, the finest harbor on the 
Pacific north of San Francisco, and it seems somewhat singular that Esquimault, 
which is the chief station of the British squadron in the Pacific, should not have been 
selected as the capital instead of Victoria. 

Under the " Victoria Harbor Act," passed by the Provincial Government in 
1860, a commission was appointed to make a thorough examination of the harbor, 
and to make suggestions as to its improvement. This commission reportod on 28th 
February, 1862, to the effect that vessels of 15 feet draught could only enter at high 
water, (tides rise 10 feet), and recommended that the bar at the entrance and the 
channel should be dredged so as to give 14 feet at low water, for which purpose 
they suggest that a dredge and steamer should be purchased. Acting on ihjs report 
the Provincial Government in 1863 purchased in England the machinery for a 
dredge and punts and the engines for a steam tug. The hulls were built in Vic- 
toria, and, in 1864, the dredge and the steamer "Sir James Douglas" were finished 
at a cost of about $92,000. The working of the dredge, however, proved unsatis- 
factory, and on 14th June, 1865, in consequence of a resolution passed by the House 
of Assembly, the superintendent and all tne crew were paid off and the dredge laid 
up. The " Sir James Douglas " was shortly after employed on postal service, and 
no further steps seem to have been taken with reference to dredging the harbor. 

On the entry of British Columbia into the Union, the dredging plant and 
steamer " Sir James Douglas " were transferred to the Dominion Government ; and, 
in 1872, dredging operations were commenced, and have, with some interruptions, 
been continued ever since. At first a tug was hired at $400 per month, but, in 18*74, 
the tug " Georgia " was purchased, and has since been used in dredging. Up to the 
close of the fiscal year, 1880, a total quantity of 117,633 cubic yards of material had 
been removed, at a total cost of $80,661.1*1, of which $32,374.53, was for vessels, 
machinery, etc. Of the result attained Mr. Pearse, in his Eeport dated 12th January, 
1880, says: — " In 1859, the water at tho entrance to the harbor would only admit of 
the entrance of vessels drawing 18 feet at extreme high water springs. Now vessels 
having that draught, can get in at half tide; and vessels drawing 21 to 22 feet, can 
enter at high water springs. In 1859, the entrance at the Spit was only 390 feet 
wide, it is now 590 feet. It was formerly very tortuous, and for this reason, long 
ships found it extremely difficult, even in fair weather, to make the sharp turn neces- 
sary at the Spit. It is now a comparatively straight course." He furthur estimates 
that in order to get a depth of 14 feet at low water spring tides over the bar and as far 
as the wharves (which would be equal to 24 feet at high water), would require addi- 
tional dredging to the amount of $62,044.65. During 1880, the dredge and tug were 
mouth of the employed at the Fraser, wintering in the Coquitten River, and only 
resuming work in Victoria Harbor, on 19th January, 1882, when some dredging was 
done in front of the wharves, and work afterwards resumed at the Spit off Shoal Point, 
where she was still engaged at the close of the fiscal year, 1882. 

Beaver Rock. — One of the greatest obstructions m Victoria Harbor was the 
Beaver Rock, which was about 100 feet in length by 60 feet broad, and was only 
about 3 feet below low water spring tides. It was directly in the way of vessels 
going to their berths, and many grounded on it. On 12th April, 1875, a contract 
was entered into with Mr. Thomas Spence for its removal for the sum of $11,950. 
Mr. Spence succeeded in blasting the rock, but was somewhat slow in removing the 
material, and, on 17th May, 1881, the work was taken out of his hands and completed 
under the direction of Hon. Mr. Trutch, Government Agent. In his Report, dated 
1st November, 1882, Mr. Trutch says :— 

275 
10 a — 181 



4:6 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



"This important work was brought to a conclusion on the 22nd August, 1881, 
and after a careful survey had been made by which it was determined that there 
were no projecting points of rock within 12 feet 6 inches of low water, level of spring 
tides. The barges, caisson and other plant were removed and stored. There is now 
a depth of 12 feet 6 inches of water at low water, spring tides, over the whole site 
of the rock." 

Total expenditure by the Department in Victoria Harbor since Confederation, 
viz. :— 

Eemoval of Beaver Rock $ 7,334.85 

Dredging 76,395.01 



$83,779.86 



LIGHTHOUSES, ROADS AND BRIDGES, DAWSON KOAD (RED RIVER 
ROUTE), ST. FRANCES LOCK. 

For report on lighthouses, roads and bridges, Dawson Road (Red River Route), 
St. Frances Lock, see Appendix No. 20 . 



SURVEYS. 



Surveys have been made at the following places, and reports and estimates of 
the eost of improvements submitted : — 

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA. 



ANNAPOLIS COUNTY. 



Anderson's Cove 
Annapolis (for bridge) 



Lower Granville 
Parker's Cove 



CAPE BRETON COUNTY. 



Reaver Cove 
Campbell's Harbour 
Catalogue Gut 
Christmas Island 
East Bay 



Falso Bay Beach 

Gabarus River 

Grand Narrows, or Barra Strait 

Little Bras d'Or 

Open Pond 



COLCHESTER COUNTY. 



Forbes Landing (Old Barns) 
Great Village River 



Truro 



CUMBERLAND COUNTY. 



Advocate" Harbour 
Apple River 
Diligence Harbour 
Lower Cove 
Port Greville 



Ram's Head River 
Spencer's Island 
Three Sisters 
West Bay 



276 



46 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Bear Eiver 
Church Point 
Freeport 
Gilbert's Cove 
Grossecoque 



DTQBY COUNTY. 



Gulliver's Hole 

Tiverton 

Westport 

West Sandy Cove 



GUY8B0R0 COUNTY. 



Anderson's Creek 
Barachois 
Brennan's Cove 
Clam Fond 
Cooks' Cove 
Fox Island 



Indian Harbour 

New Harbour 

Salmon Eiver 

St, Francis Harbour (Goose Pond) 

St. Mary's Eiver 

Wine Harbour 



Jeddore Harbour 
Peggy's Cove 



HALIFAX COUNTY. 

Porter's Lake (for canal) 



HANTS COUNTY 



Cheverie 
Hantsport 



Noel Bay 
Walton 



Long Point 
Port Hastings 



INVERNESS COUNTY. 



Port Hawkesbury 
Smith's Island, Port Hood 



KINGS COUNTY. 



Baxter's Harbour 
Bennet's Cove 
Black Eock 
Hall's Harbour 
Little Clam Cove 



Long Beach 

Eoss' Creek, Cornwallis 

Wells' Cove 

Wolfville 



Petite Eiviere 



Cameron's Cove 
Cape John Cove 



LUNENBURG COUNTY. 

Port Medway Island 

PICTOU COUNTY. 

Caribou (Big Island) 
MacDonald's Cove 



Bell's Point, PortMouton 
Coffin's Island 
Eagle Head 
Hunts' Point 
Port Joli 



QUEEN S COUNTY. 



Port Mouton 
Western Head 
White Point 
Willow Cove 



211 






46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883- 



RICHMOND COUNTY. 



Birch Island 
Cap la Ronde 
Fourche 
Grand Goulet 



Grand Eiver 

Haul -over, He Madame 

River Bourgeois 



SHELBURNE COUNTY. 



Cape Negro Island 
Cape Sable Island 
Cat Point 
Jones' Harbor 



Louis' Head Harbor 
Port l'Hebert 
Shelburne 
Stony Island 



Aspey Bay 



VICTORIA COUNTY. 

Neil's Harbor 



Abram's River 



YARMOUTH COUNTY. 

Pubnico 



PROVINCE OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND- 



Bedeque Harbour, 
Brae River, 


Prince County, 
do 


Cape Traverse, 


do 


Cascumpec Harbour, 
Egmont Bay, 
Fifteen Point, 
Kildare, 


do 
do 
do 
do 


Nail Pond, 


do 


Skinner's Pon d 


do 


Traverse Cove, 


do 


West Pond, 


do 


Bell Creek, 

Cove Head Harbour, 


Queen's County 
do 


French River, 


do 


South-west River, 


do 


Tracadie Harbour, 


do 


Tryon Harbour, 
Savage Harbour, 
Souris West, 


do 

King's County. 

do 



PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK. 



ALBERT COUNTY. 



Anderson s Hollow. 



218 



Hopewell. 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



On Island of Grand Man an 

1. Dark Harbour. 

2. Flag Cove. 

3. Gull Cove. 

4. Seal Cove. 

5. Whale Cove. 

6. Woodwards Cove. 



Caraquet. 
Pokesbaw. 



CHARLOTTE COUNTY. 



Beaver Harbour, 
Lepreau. 
River St. Croix. 



GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 

Tracadie. 



KENT COUNTY. 

Kouchibouguac Harbour. 

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY. 

Mirimachi Eiver below Newcastle. 

queen's county. 

Salmon River. 



Grinross Canal. 
Newcastle Creek. 



restigouche county. 



Campbellton Harbour. 
Charlo. 



Irishtown Cove. 



CrossPointand CampbelltonFerry 
River Restigouche. 



ST. jchn county. 



VICTORIA COUNTY. 



International Bridges across the St. John River. 

Several sites have been surveyed between St. Francis and the Grand Falls. 



WESTMORELAND COUNTY. 



Cape Tormentine (Interprovincial Ferry.) 
Moncton (Hall's Creek Dock.) 



PROVINCE OF QUEBEC. 



Amherst Harbour, 
House Harbour, 
Cape Tormentine, 



Rimouski, 

Chute a Blondeau, 



1867, 1868, 1869, 1870. 

Magdalen Islands, 

do 
River St. Lawrence, 

1870, 1871, 1872, 1873. 

River St. Lawrence, 
Ottawa River, 
2,9 



Gaspe County. 

do 
Charlevoix County. 



Rimouski County. 
Argenteuil County, 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 181 



Kiver Blanche, 

River du Loup (en bas), 

Eiver Ouelle, 

I/Islet, 

Grosse Isle, 

Berthier, 



1873, 1874, 1875, 1876. 

Eiver St. Lawrence, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Rimouski County. 
Temiscouata County. 
Kamouraska County. 
L'lslet County. 
Montmagny County. 
Belleehasse County. 



Bic, 

Trois Pistoles, 



Matane, 

Bic, 

St. Jean Port Joli, 



Ste. Ajine du Saguenay, 
L'lslet, 
St. Thomas, 
Chenal du Moine, 



1876, 1877. 

River St. Lawrence, 
do 

1877, 1878. 

River St. Lawrence, 
do 
do 

1878, 1879. 

River Saguenay, 
River St. Lawrence, 

do 

do 

1879, 1880. 



Rimouski County. 
Temiscouata County. 



Rimouski County. 

do 
L'lslet County. 



Chicoutimi County. 
L'lslet County. 
Montmagny County. 
Richelieu County. 



House Harbour, 


Magdalen Islands, 


Gaspe County. 


Etang du Nord, 


do 


do 


Etang des Caps, 


do 


do 


Amherst Harbour, 


do 


do 


Bassin Bay, 


do 


do 


Cape Cove, 


do 


do 


Perce, 


Bay of Chaleurs, 


do 


Grand Pabos, 


do 


do 


Caplan, 


do 


Bonaventure County. 


New Richmond, 


do 


do 


Carleton, 


do 


do 


Rimouski, 


River St. Lawrence, 


Rimouski County. 


River du Loup (en bas), 


do 


Temiscouata County. 


St. Ire nee, 


do 


Charlevoix County. 


St. Roch des Aulnaies, 


do 


L'lslet County. 


St. Francois de File, 


do 


Montmorency County. 


Ste. Famille de l'lle, 


do 


do 


River Nicolet, 




Nicolet County. 


Riviere a la Graisse, 


Rigaud, 

1880, 1881. 


Taudreuil County. 


L'Anse a l'Eau, 


River Saguenay, 


Saguenay County. 


L'Anse du Portage, 


do 


do 


Matane, 


River St. Lawrence, 


Rimouski County. 


Cap a I'Aigle, 


do 


Charlevoix County. 


Isle aux Coudres, 


do 


do 


Bay St. Paul, 


do 


do 


Les Ecureuils, 


do 


Portneuf County. 


St. Pierre les Becquets, 


do 


Nicolet County. 




280 





46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1883 



Eiver du Loup {en haut), 




Maskinonge County. 


Eivor St. Francis, 




Yamaska County. 


Eiver Yamaska, 




do 


St. Ours, 


Eiver Eichelieu, 


Eichelieu County. 


St. Denis, 


do 


St. Ifyacinthe County. 


St. Hilaire, 


do 


Eouville County. 


Cedars, 


Eiver St. Lawrence, 


Soulanges County. 


St. Zotique, 


Lake St. Francis, 


do 


Lake Temiscamingue, 


Upper Ottawa. 

1881, 1882. 




Barachois de Malbaie, 


Bay of Ohaleurs, 


G-aspe County. 


Perce, 


do 


do 


Caplan, 


do 


do 


Port Daniel, 


do 


do 


Escoumains, 


Eiver St. Lawrence, 


Saguenay County. 


Grande Decharge, 


Lake St. John, 


Chicoutimi County. 


Port an Saumon, 


Eiver St. Lawrence, 


Charlevoix County. 


The Traverse, 


do 




St. Jean Port Joli, 


do 


L'Islet County. 


St. Francois de Pile. 


do 


Montmorency County* 


St. Michel, 


do 


Bellechasse County. 


Pointe aux Trembles, 


do 


Portneuf County. 


Three Eivers, 


do 


Three Eivers County. 


Eiver St. Francis, 




Yamaska County. 


Baeot Hayes Shoal, 


Eiver St. Lawrence, 




Upper Eiver Ottawa. 







PEOYINCE OF ONTAEIO. 



1867, 1868. 



Murray Canal, 
Port Dover, 
Dawson Eoad, 



Lake Erie, 



1868, 186 Ji, 1870. 



Grenville Dam, Eiver Ottawa, 
Long Point (Port Eowan), Lake Erie, 
Port Burwell, do 

Port Stanley, do 

Rondeau, do 

Two Creeks, do 

Bayfield, Lake Huron, 



Goderich, 


do 


Kincardine, 


do 


Inverhuron, 


do 


Port Elgin, 


do 


Saugeen or Southampton, 


do 


Chantry Island, 


do 



Prince Edward County. 
Norfolk County, 
Algoma County. 



Prescott County. 
Norfolk County. 
Elgin County. 

do 
Kent County. 
Essex County. 
Huron County. 

do 
Bruce County. 

do 

do 

do 



281 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188, 





1872, 1873, 1874. 


Kingston, 


Lake Ontario, 


Picton, 


Bay of Quinte, 


Napanee, 


do 


Salmon Kiver, 


do 


Belleville, 


do 


Presqu'Ile, 


Lake Ontario, 


Cobourg, 


do 


Port Hope, 


do 


Port Stanley, 


Lake Erie, 


Kingsville, 


do 


Chenal Ecarte, 


Lake St. Clair. 


Sarnia, 


Kiver St. Clair, 


Bayfield, 


Lake Huron, 


Port Albert, 


do 


Kincardine, 


do 


Inverhuron, 


do 


Owen Sound, 


Georgian Bay, 


Meaford, 


do 


Thorn bury, 


do 




1874, 1875. 


Port Hope, 


Lake Ontario, 


Port Darlington, 


do 


Oshawa, 


do 


Whitby, 


do 


Pickering, 


do 


Toronto, 


do 


Port Burwell, 


Lake Erie, 


Kiver Detroit, 




Kiver Sydenham (East Branch), 


Port Franks, 


Lake Huron, 


Port Elgin, 


do 




1875, 1876. 


Napanee, 


Bay of Quinte, 


Trenton, 


do 


Nigger Island, 


do 


Belleville, 


do 


Morpeth, 


Lake Erie, 


Eagle, 


do 


Kiver Detroit (Tunnel). 






1876, 1877. 


Nigger Island, 


Bay of Quinte, 


Newcastle, 


Lake Ontario, 


Toronto, 


do 


Oakville, 


do 


Niagara Kiver, 




Kondoau, 


Lake Erie, 


Kiver Sydenham (North Bj 


•anch), 


Parry Sound, 


• Georgian Bay, 


Neebish Kapids, 




Kiver Kaministiquia. 






282 



Frontenac County. 
Prince Edward County 
Lennox County. 
Hastings County. 

do 
Prince Edward County 
Northumberland Count 
Hastings County. 
Elgin County. 
Essex County. 
Kent County. 
Lambton County. 
Huron County. 

do 
Bruce County. 

do 
Grey County. 

do 

do 



Hastings County* 
Durham County. 
Ontario County. 

do 

do 
York County. 
Elgin County. 
Essex County. 
Bothwell County. 
Huron County. 
Bruce County. 



Lennox County. 
Northumberland Coub 
Hastings County. 

do 
Bothwell County. 
Essex County. 



Hastings County. 
Durham County. 
York County. 
Hal ton County. 
Wei land County. 
Kent Count}\ ' 
Lambton County. 
Muskoka County. 
Algoma County, 
do 



116 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 





1877, 1878. 




Burlington Piers, 


Lake Ontario, 


Wentworth County. 


Port Stanley , 


Lake Erie, 


Elgin County. 


Owen Sound, 


Georgian Bay, 


Grey County. 


Meaford, 


do 


do 


Collingwood, 


do 


Simcoe County. 


Prince Arthur's Lauding, 


Lake Superior, 
1878, 1879. 


Algoma County. 


Black Creek, 


South Bay, 


Prince Edward County.. 


Weller's Bay, 


Lake Ontario, 


do 


Port Albert, 


Lake Huron, 


Huron County. 


Kincardine, 


do 


Bruce County. 


Thorn bury, 


Georgian Bay, 


Grey County . 


Penetanguishene, 


do 

1879, 1880. 


Simcoe County. 


Toronto, 


Lake Ontario, 
1880, 1881« 


York County; 


Portsmouth Harbour, 


Lake Ontario, 


Frontenac County. 


Belleville, 


Bay of Quinte, 


Hastings County. 


Eiver Moira, 


do 


do 


PresquTle to Bay of Quinte, 


Prince Edward County, 


Whitby, 


Lake Ontario, 


Ontario County. 


Pigeon Bay, 


Lake Erie, 


Essex County. 


Pelee Island, 


do 


do 


Eiver Thames, 


Lake St. Clair, 


do 


Point Edward, 


Eiver St. Clair, 


Lambton County. 


Goderich, 


Lake Huron, 


Huron County. 


Kincardine, 


do 


Bruce County. 


Southampton, 


do 


do 


Wiarton, 


Georgian Bay, 


do 


Meaford. 


do 


Grey County. 


Collingwood, 


do 


Simcoe County. 


Little Current, 




Algoma County. 


Keebish Eapids, 




do 


Eiver Kaministiquia. 




do 


Prince Arthur's Landing, 


Lake Superior, 
1881, 1882. 


do 


Kingston, 


Lake Ontario, 


Frontenac County. 


Wellington, 


do 


Prince Edward County* 


Newcastle, 


do 


Durham County. 


The Narrows between Lakes Simcoe and Couchiching 




Kingsville, 


Lake Erie, 


Essex County. 


Sarnia, 


Eiver St. Clair, 


Lambton County. 


Bayfield, 


Lake Huron, 


Huron County. 


Goderich, 


do 


do 


Port Albert, 


do 


Bruce County. 


Kincardine, 


do 


do 


Southampton, 


do 


do 


Eiver au Sable, 


do 


do 


Tobermory, 


do 


do 


Wiarton, 


Georgian'Bay, 


do 


Collingwood, 


do 

283 


Simcoe County. 



18 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188 



PROVINCE OF MANITOBA. 



1873, 1874 
Bed Rivei-, near St, Andrews. 



1881, 1882. 
Lake Manitoba. 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Beaver Rock, 



1874. 
Fraser River. 
1880, 1881. 
Skeena River, 



Naas River. 



HENRY F. PERLEY, 

Cnief Engineer. 



281 



Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



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Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 18831 



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1855. The whole superstructure 
in 1876-7-8. 
ted. 

1866. An addition was built in '82. 
1848. 

a 1879 and completed in 1882. 
1853. This pier was repaired in 


licipality by means of Municipal 

ipleted. 

feet at half neap and 8J at half 


. Thi3 pier was completed at the 
seal year 1881-82. 
t the end of this wharf. This 
built by the Municipality, and is 
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46 Victoria. 




Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 


1383 


1 




Remarks. 


Completed in 1858. 

The works were commenced in 
1829 ; an extension of 200 ft. 
to the East Pier is under con- 
tract. 

The works were commenced in 
1832. The breakwater, 300 ft. 
in length, is undrr contract. 

The rebuilding of the piers and 
the pilwork will be let shortly. 

The works were commenced in 
1843. 

Queen's Wharf. The works 
wece oommenced in 1833. 

This work is under contract. 
Messrs. Uooke !d Jones are the 
con trac to rs . Operations w e i e 
commenced on 1st Jan., !883. 

The works were commenced in 
18.9. 

The works were commenced in 
1825. They are keptin repairs 
by the Department of Rail- j 
ways and Canals. 1 


: 

i 




Expenditure 

Government, Local 

Companies, Municipal 

Authority or 

Harbour 

Commissioners. 


Local Municipality 
and Government. 

Company, Town 
Council and Gov- 
ernment. 

Company, Commis- 
sioners and Gov- 
ernment. 

Company, Commis- 
sioners and Gov- 
ernment 

Company and Gov- 
ernment. 

Harbour Company 
and Government. 

Township, Harbour 
Company and Gov- 
ernment. 

bourC ommissioners. 
Government 

Wm. Chisholm and 
Government. 


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15-30 

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20-30 

• 
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15-30 

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20-40 




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3,890 

9,774 

2,210 
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1,620 

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2,710 


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1,471 

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1,180 

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Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



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Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



APPENDIX No. 4. 



REPORT ON HARBOURS 

IN THE 

MARITIME PROVINCES. 

BY 

G. F. 8AILLAIRGE, 

Formerly Assistant Chief Engineer, now Deputy of the 
Minister of Public Works. 



10 a— 19| 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188& ; 



APPENDIX No. 4. 

REPORT ON HARBOURS IN THE MARITIME PROVINCES. 

By* (x. F. Baillairge\ 
No. 22969. 

Cedars, 15th May, 1872. 

Sir, — In obedience to your instructions No. 11,055 of 4th July, 1871, I examin< 
the various harbours of the Maritime Provinces where improvements had beeaf 
applied for or were desirable, as shown by the references with which I had been) 
furnished or otherwise. 

The following preliminary Report is now submitted — showing the nature and! 
probable cost of the projected improvements and whether they are of a Local of 
Federal character. 

Plans with a more detailed Report can be furnished hereafter. The variouJ 
references named in the present Report, are transmitted herewith together witlj; 
references Nos. 3,885, of 29th June, 1868, 15,363, of 30th March, 1871, and 15,943' 
of 5th May, 1871. Also references : — 

Nos. 9,630 of 6th March, 1871. 



(t 


9,755 " 17th « 


(t 


U 


9,756 " 17th " 


a 


a 


9,971 of 8th April, 


1871. 


a 


10,042 « 15th " 


it 


it 


10,157 " 21th " 


tt 


« 


10,182 " 24th " 


a 


i( 


10,193 " 25th « 


a 


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10,213 " 26th " 


tt 


It 


10,215 " 26th " 


a 



IN NEW BRUNSWICK. 

BEAVER HARBOUR — CHARLOTTE COUNTY. 

On the northern coast of the Bay of Fundy, forty-four miles below St. John. 

Memorial No. 6,718 from inhabitants of parishes of Pennfield and St. George ft 
a grant of $4,000 towards building a breakwater, 14th May, 1869. 

Surveyed in November and December, 1871, under my instructions by Ale 
Munro, P.L.S. 

Probable cost of breakwater for shelter of harbour. 

Estimate : No, 1, 350 feet long, ending in 6Jfeet at low water, $ 20,100 

" No. 2, 550 " " " 29 " " " 62,000 

" No. 3, 750 " " " 29 « " " 107,600 

u No. 1, would give very little shelter. 

" " 2, would be a much better protection. 

" " 3, is the most desirable. 

The above may be considered as being of a Federal character. 
Seo Report of Alex. Munro, P.L.S., appended hereto, with plan. 

292 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 




Shippagan Gully, Gloucester County. 

On the eastern coast of New Brunswick, between Baio des Chaleurs and Gulf of 
t. Lawrence, midway between Shediac, Northumberland Strait and Campbellton, at 
e head of Baie des Chaleurs. 

Gully down to Shediac 120 miles. 

Gully across Baie des Chaleurs to Port Daniel , 30 " 

Gully up Baie des Chaleurs to Campbelltown ». 100 " 

Dredging and breakwater required to a depth of 15 feet at low water. 

Probable cost of projected works varies from $310,718 to $108,550, according to 
location and breadth of channel to be excavated. 

For further details, see my Report of 22nd April, 18*72, enclosing that of Mr. 
Rosa, who surveyed Gully under my instructions. 

May be considered as a Federal work. 

See Report of Joseph Rosa, C.E., appended hereto, with plan. 



IN NOYA SCOTIA. 



n 
i 



CAPE BRETON ISLAND. 
North- Bast Coast. — County of Victoria. 

From Cape North at the north eastern extremity of Cape Breton to St. Ann's 
Bay, there is not a single harbour where vessels ean seek refuge. 

Aspee Bay and Ingonish are the only localities where the requisite shelter might 
be obtained by means of dredging and breakwaters, for vessels of 11 feet draught at 
low waters 

The north pond of Aspee Bay and the south pond of Ingonish South are the best 
•ites for the projected works; the former is nine miles below Cape North, and fifty- 
two miles above St. Ann's Harbour ; the latter is thirty-four miles below Cape 
Xorth and twenty -seven above St. Ann's Harbour. 

Aspee Bay would probably be of a more general benefit than Ingonish, but the 
latter would afford a better harbour at less cost than the former. 

One or the other should be improved as a Federal harbour, if not each of them. 

The fisheries along this part of the coast are paralysed for the want of a harbour. 

ASPEE BAY NORTH. 

PROBABLE COST OF IMPROVEMENTS. 

Dredging channel across sand bar 200 feet wide and 18 

feet deep at low water $ 57,500 

f Protection piers at entrance seaward on each side of 

dredged channel 224,600 

Present channel to be dammed 1,800 

$283,900 
Dredging channel at head of Young's Island 209 feet wide 

by 18 feet deep 37,000 

$320,900 

A channel at the head of Young's Island would give access to the main portion 
of the pond, which is very extensive and deep; its construction might be deferred 

293 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



im'ii such time when the accommodation for vessels between the Island and the Sand 
Bar becomes too limited. 

INGONISH, SOUTH. 

PROBABLE COST OF IMPROVEMENTS. 

Dredging channel across sand bar 200 feet wide by 18 feet 

deep at low water , $31,000 

Breakwater on north side of Channel 64,000 

$85,000 

I also examined a site proposed for a breakwater at North Ingonish, from Archi- 
bald's Point, but took no measurements. 

From information obtained on the spot, a breakwater of 1,000 feet in length, 
terminating into fifteen feet at low water, would give shelter to fifty vessels of from 
12 to 15 feet draught, and would cost about $4*7,000. 

This I consider as a Local work ; it would, however, be of great advantage if 
the projected improvements at Aspee Bay and South Ingonish are not made. 

The three preceding harbours were examined between 23rd October and 3rd 
November, 1871. 

See reference, No. 14,911, with application by W. Boss, Esq., M.P., for a sum 
of $9,000 for dredging and crib work at Cape North and Ingonish, dated 2nd March, 
1871. Also, No. 10,712, of 2nd May, 1870, from same person, respecting Aspee Bay 
and Ingonish. 

CAPE BBETON ISLAND. 

North West Coast — County of Inverness. 



Br 

it 



From Cap St. Laurent, at the north-western extremity of Cape Breton, to Mabou^ 
(a distance of eighty miles) the coast is destitute of harbours ^ ith sufficient shelter. 
The localities I examined and for which applications have been made are: — 

Grande Anse, 15 miles below Cap St. Laurent. 
Cheticamp, 35 " " " " 

Margarie, 50 " " '• " 

Chimney Corner 55 " " " " 

The most eligible site for improvement with respect to vessels engaged in the 
Gulf fisheries, between Cape Breton and Prince Edward's Island, is Cheticamp. 

Here a very extensive harbour can be formed between the mainland and Cheti- 
camp Island, nearly two and a half miles in length, for the accommodation of vessels 
drawing fifteen feet of water or more. 

At Chimney Corner a harbour of smaller extent might be formed, and would be 
of great benefit for the important coal mines opened some years ago, but would not 
be so useful to navigation as at Cheticamp. 

Cheticamp should certainly be improved as a Federal harbour. 

Any improvements th; t might be done at Chimney Corner, will depend on th 
importance the Government may attach to it as a coaling station. 

Grande Anse is scarcely susceptible of improvement. 

Margarie might be improved as a Local work, but is very much exposed. 

PROBABLE COST OF IMPROVEMENTS AT CHETICAMP. 

Dredging channel 200 feet wide and sixteen feet deep.... $ 50,000 

Protection piers at entrance of dredged channel 99,500 

Dam from main shore to island 16,700 



$166,200 
294 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) ' A. 18S3 



PROBABLE COST OF IMPROVEMENTS AT CHIMNEY CORNER. 

Breakwater across Bay, in sixteen feet least water at low 
tide ....,.....$145,000 

Eock excavation for sixteen feet water seaward,and between 

breakwater and present pier ($1 50 per cubic yard).... 123,000 

Eock excavation for twelve feet water in remainder of 
harbour 57,000 



1325,000 

Examination made 27th September to 19th October, 1871. 

See reference No. 15,459 of 4th April, 1871, from H. Cameron, Esq., M.P., 
jpecting above harbours; also, reference No. 15,459 from Thos. Evans and others 
jpecting Chimney Corner, asking for a grant of one half of the cost of improve- 
mts required jalso, reference No. 15,500, of 7th April, 1871, from H. Cameron, Esq., 
•P., with memorial from Grande Anse. 

SMITH'S ISLAND, COUNTY OF INVERNESS. 

(Opposite Port Rood, on ISorth-West Coast of Cape Breton Island.) 

This Island, which I examined on 26th September, 1871, forms the western side 
Port Hood harbour. The best anchorage and shelter are towards its upper end, 
•posite the village of Port Hood. 

The north-western side of the Island is being washed away from year to year, 
BO that eventually the head will be separated Irorn the main body of the same, 
and the harbour will then be exposed to filling up from the sea. 

I see no immediate necessity for this work, as the distance yet to be cut away 
by the sea, between the N. W. and N. E. sides of the Inland, is about 1,700 feet. 

Probable cost of a protection breakwater or breastwork, $13,600. 

This work is of a Federal character. 

See reference No. 15,397 of hrd April, 1871, from H. Cameron, Esq., M. P., for- 
warding a memorial from inhabitants of Port Hood and Master Mariners. 



NORTH COAST OF NOYA SCOTIA, ON NORTHUMBERLAND STRAIT. 

WALLACE HARBOUR, COUNTY OP CUMBERLAND. 

Fony-five miles above Pictou. 

Forty miles below Baie Yerte Yillage. 

Thivy-three miles across to Charlottetown, P. E. 1. 

Examined 14th, 15th November, 1871. 

Thi^ is a place of sufficient importance to be classified as a Federal Harbour. 

The only improvements applied for are the placing of buoys to indicate the 
sntrance into the harbour, and also the widening and deepening of the channel 
lpwards towards the draw-bridge on the Post Road, above the village, for the purpose 
■)F enabling vessels to reach the extensive and valuable quarries from which large 
uantities of building stone are exported to the United States and elsewhere. 

Probable Cost. 

stimate No. 1. — Dredging a channel forty feet wide and fifteen feet 

deep, at low water $9,000 

Buoys along channel 500 






295 



$9,500 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1888 



Estimate No. 2. — Dredging a channel fifty feet wide and sixteen feet 

deep, at low water $16, 

Buoys 5' 

$16,50<j 

See reference No. 16,801 of 23rd February, 1871, from Hon. Alex. McFarW 
asking for a grant of $5,000 to be expended in dredging. 




NORTH SIDE, BASIN OF MINES, NOVA SCOTIA. 

PARRSBOROUGH, OOUNTT OP CUMBERLAND. 

Twenty-eight miles across Basin of Mines to Windsor; fifty miles by land 
Truro. 

Present wharf built 1858-59. 

Examined 22nd, 23rd November, 1871. 

The present wharf is partly undermined towards the shore end, on its upj 
side; the great quantity of sand accumulated by the sea, against its opposite side 
has caused it to incline over; the top surface is about three feet lower on one sid» 
than the other. 

This work being the only point accessible to a steamer on the west side of th 
Basin of Mines, from Truro eastward, to Cape Chignecto westward, a distance o1| 
85 miles, shonld be considered as a Federal Work. 

The harbour some distance above the wharf is being partly filled with sand aw 
gravel from the sea, the beach between the harbour and the sea being of insufficient 
height ; it shou'd bo raised for a distance of about 750 feet and the face of the Light! 
house Pier should be protected against undermining. 

PROBABLE COST. 

Kepairs and protection of landing wharf. , $9,400 

Eaising top surface of beach and protecting light-house pier. 6,000 

$15,400 

SOUTH-WEST SIDE, BASIN OF MINES, NOYA SCOTIA 

Hantsport — County op Hants; 
(Near the Boundary Line between Hants and King Counties.) 

On north west side of the Eiver Avon, which empties into the Ba^in of Mine 
seven miles below Windsor, at head of the Avon ; forty-five miles below Maitlanc 
near head of Cobequid Bay ; seventy-seven miles above Annapolis, by railway. 

Examined 24th to 27th November, 1871. 

May be considered as Federal. 

This is the only place I have seen on the Basin of Mines, where a pier can 
constructed accessible from the Bay of Fundy, at low water, to vessels drawing a" 
1 J fathoms. 

PROBABLE COST. 

Breakwater, answering also as a landing pier, if built 

opposite end of street below wharfs of village $102,000 

Breakwater, answering also as a landing place, if built to 

foot of bank opposite railway station $92,000 

296 



1 46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188S 



The latter gives the deepest water. A road to the pier in either case, if required, 
ahould be made by local authorities. 

See Keferenee No. 14,983 of 7th March, 1871, inclosing a memorial for a grant 
of $20,000 for the construction of a public wharf. 

KINGS' S COUNTY. 

King's County is bounded eastward by the Basin of Mines, northward by the 
Bay of Fundy. 

I examined the harbours of this County between the 28th November and the 8th 
December, 1871. 

The following is a list of them, viz : — 

I. Oak Point, on the went side of Basin of Mines, 2 miles from Canning, 12 
Dorth-east from Kentville railway station, 13 below Hantsport, 20 above Cape Split, 
and 15 across to Parrsborough. 

2. Little Clam Cove and another place near 

3. Scott's Bay, 4. Wells' Cove, 
5. Ross's Creek, 6. Bennett's Cove, 
7. Black Hole, 8. Baxter's Harbour, 
9. Hall's Harbour, 10. Chipman's Brook, 

II. Canada Creek, 12. Harborville and 
13. Morden Cross, on the Bay of Fundy. 
Landing piers accessible at high water have already been constructed by the 

Local Government or otherwise at Oak Point, Baxter's Harbour, Hall's Harbour, 
Chipman's Brook, Canada Creek, Harborville and Morden Cross. 

The best sits for a Federal Harbour, accessible at all stages of the tide on the 
Bay of Fundy coast, is, in my opinion, at Hall's Harbour or at Harborville; the latter 
would make the best harbour and could be easily reached from the Annapolis and 
Windsor Railway, but it is scarcely more than 12 miles above Margaretville, whereas 
Hall's Harbour is nearly 27 miles above the same place. Both are places of 
importance . 

At Oak Point, which should also be considered as a Federal work, the present 
pier requires to be strengthened and extended. This place is the outlet of a large 
agricultural district. 

PROBABLE COST OP PROJECTED WORKS. 

Extension and protection of present pier at Oak^Point, $19,000. 

hall's harbour. 

Breakwater required on east side, ending in 16 feet water 
at low water; estimate based on soundings sent me 
by L. D. V. Chipman, Esq., M.P $120,000 

Raising and extension of present pier to the same depth 

of water at low water ....... 117,000 

Dredging channel 100 feet wide on the east side of 
present pier to admit vessels into upper part of 
harbour at high water ,. 5,000 

$242,000 

HARBORVILLE. 

Breakwater required on east side, ending in 16 feet to 

17 feet at low water $135,000 

Extension of present pier on west side of harbour 128,000 

$263,000 
297 






46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



, 



See reference No. 14877, of 27th February, 1871, from L. D. Y. Chipman, Esq., 
M.P., with memorial from inhabitants of Scott's Bay, for a grant of $4,000. 

Also see reference No. 14,883 of 1st March, 1871, from'L. D. V. Chipman, includ- 
ing a memorial for a grant of $6,000 for the construction of a pier or steamboat land- 
ing this year. 

Also No. 14,874, of 27th February, 1871, from E. Biglow and others, for a grant 
of $2,500, for a breakwater at Boss's Cre k. 

COUNTY OP ANNAPOLIS, ON H< UTH-WEST COAST, BAY OP FUNDY. 

Port Williams (Port Lome) about iourteen miles below Margaretville. 

Examined 9th December, 1871. 

It is doubtful whether this harbour should be considered as one of aFedera 
character or not, on account of its proximity to Margaretville, unless the Govern 
ment should find it proper to do so, as there is but one harbour in a distance of fort; 
miles to Digby Gut. 

The improvement required at this port, is the extension ofjthe present piei 
down to the low water line, or for a distance of about 300 feet. 

Probable cost projected extension, $1 8,000. 

See reference No. 15,258, of 24th March, 1871, er closing memorial from the Pen 
WilliatLs Pier Company and others, applying for a grant of $2,000 towards the corj 
struction of the extension of the present pier. 

DIGBY COUNTY, ON WESTERN COAST, NOVA SCOTIA. 

Sissiboo River. 

Outlet at village of Weymouth, about nineteen miles below Digby, on S| 
Mary's Bay. 



Reference No. 15,005 of 8th March, 1871, contains a memorial from the inhabi J 
antss of Weymouth, praying for. a grant of $800 or $1,000, during two years, towarc' 
cleaning out the north-east branch of the river. 

I called at Weymouth, on the 13th December, 1871, with the intention of exanl 
ining this portion of the river, but could not, as it is situated in the midst of ttj 
forest, without any road along the same. 

According to information furnished me in the locality by Colin Campbell, Esq 
the first tweh e miles of the river, from its outlet upward, are unobstructed ; thone: 
eighteen miles are obstructed by granite •blocks of from seven to fifty tons. Thesf 
rocks are in the rapids, viz : — 

1st. At the junction of the north-east branch and the Main River. 

2nd. At two miles above this junction. 

3rd. At one mile further. 

4th. At one and a-half miles above the latter point. 

5th. From the main stream to second Wallace Lake, one mile obstructed 

This is the principal part to be cleared. 
6th. From first to second lake, three-quarters of a mile obstructed. 

The largest quantity of timber is to be found around Tom Wallace ai:- Lit! 
Wallace Lakes, at about thirty miles from the outlet of the river. 

The timber consists chiefly of pine and spruoe. 

What is wanted is an unobstructed passage for single logs for a distance I 
eighteen miles. 

Last year the quantity of lumber made on the Sissiboo amounted to about thro 
millions of feet, board measure. This quantity might be doubled or trebbled if t 
stream was improved . 

298 



16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Whether tho work should bo considered a Federal one or not, I am not prepared 
to say. The revenue derived from the lumber trade in the locality will probably 
anable the Government to decide this question. 

METEGHAN IAEBOUE. 
Also on St. Mary's Bay.^ 

About 38 miles below Digby. 

The memorial from the inhabitants of this portion of Digby County, dated 6th 
bruary. 18*71, in reference No. 14,918 of 3rd March, 18*71, prays for a grant to aid 
em to repair the public wharf at Meteghan. 

My examination of the harbour was made in company with the local member, 
Doucet, Esq., M.P.P. 

I was informed that the river is about eighteen miles in length, that there are 
enty mills upon it, ten of which send lumber to Meteghan. Each mill is said to 
nish 100,000 feet of lumber ; one of the mills furnishes nearly S00,000 feet. 

Lumber is shipped in large quantities from the harbour to the West India 
jdards and the United States, and regular packets run during the summer season to 
3oston and St. John. 

The present wharf requires to be extended and repaired. 

This, in my opinion, should be classified as a Federal work. 

Probable cost of improvements required : 

Eepairing and raising present pier, which was constructed 

more than 1*7 years ago SSjYOO 

Extension of 200 feet, so as to render present pier accessible 
at half tide 9,400 

Dredging inside of harbour 800 



$13,900 
COUNTY OF YARMOUTH, ON WESTERN COAST, NOYA SCOTIA. 

GREEN COVE OR MAITLAND. 



Eleven miles above Yarmouth . 

I examined the public wharf and harbour of this locality, on 12th December, 

It is about midway between Meteghan and Yarmouth. 

Any improvements that might be done here, should in my opinion, be executed 
7 the Local Government. 

No estimate therefore is furnished. 

YARMOUTH HARBOUR. 

Eleven miles below Green Cave. 

Reference No. 15,48V, of 5th April, 18*71, encloses a memorial from the inhabi- 
ts of Yarmouth, praying that the bar or beach extending from Stanwood's Point 
the West Cape, and separating the Harbour from the Bay of Fundy, and in which 
caches have been made by the sea, may be repaired and protected. 

I examined this beach on the llih December, 18*71, in company with F. Killam, 

, M.P., and other gentlemen. 

PROBABLE COST OF WORK REQUIRED. 

Protecting beach at top surface, and filling breaches by means of crib- 
work, from the present crib work downwards, for a distance of 

2,300 feet $9,000 

299 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883| 



It was suggested, in lieu of the above proposed protection crib work, 
to construct a breakwater between the harbour and the beach, in 
order not only to prevent the sea from washing the beach into the 
harbour, but also for the purpose of improving the direction of the 
current in the same. Such a work would cost, if substantially 
executed, nearly , , $54,( 

The immediate protection of the beach for the smaller sum, appears to 
preferable. 

Any improvements that may hereafter be required in the harbour, are subj 
for future consideration. 

The season was too far advanced, and my time was too limited to allow me 
proceed to Larry's Harbour and Ragged. Head, in Chedabucto Bay, Guysboroug 
County, Nova Scotia, and to Grand River and the St. Peter's Canal, in Richmon 
County, Cape Breton Island, Alexander McNab, Esq., civil engineer, was instructs 
at my request, to examine these harbours and report thereon to the Departmen 
See references IN os. 10,970, 14,970, 14,973, 15,639 of 16th May, 1870, 7th Ma 
25th March, 1871. 

My examination of Little Hope Island and of the harbours at Liverpool, Digb; 
Margaretville, Maitland, Arisaig, McNair's Cove, Port Hood, Mabou, Nova Scoti 
and at Quaco, New Brunswick, for which grants were made during the last Sessic 
of Parliament, will form the subject of a separate report, if required, in addition 
my previous communications concerning the same. 

I have appended to this report a brief description of most of the localiti 
examined, according to the best authorities, up to the present time, also a series 
questions I addressed in each of the localities, to the most prominent parties, re*pe< 
ing each of the harbours and the prices of materials for the projected works at ea< 
pluoo, and also the answers given to the questions in each case, — the whole 
instructed by your two letters, Nos. 11,054, 11,055 of the 4th July, 1871— enumers 
ing the harbours where works were to be constructed or examinations to be made. 

I hare the honour to be, Sir, 

Tour obedient servant, 

G. F. BAILLAIRG^, 

Assistant Chief Engineer Public Wort 
Canada. 
F. Brown, Esq., 

Secretary Public Works, 
Ottawa. 

N.B. — A further sum of ten per cent, must be added to each| of the foregoij; 
estimates for superintendence and contingencies. 

G. F. B. 



APPENDIX TO G. F. BAILLAIRG^'S REPORT ON HARBOURS, MARITI&fr 

PROVINCES. 

Westmorland Point, N.B., 20th November, 1871. | 

Sir, — I beg to request you will proceed to Beaver Harbour, in the County^ 
Charlotte, New Brnnswick, and take such measurements, levels and soundings* 
are requisite to determine the best site for the construction of a breakwater. 

When your survey is completed, you will please submit a plan of the same, >• 
gether with a report, respecting the usefulness of the projected work to the genej*t 
interest of navigation. 

300 






Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



Amongst the various papers enclosed herewith, in reference to the work, you 
fill find a petition, No. 6,718, dated 14th May, 1869, from the inhabitants of the 
)arishes of Pennfield and St. George in the above named County. 

Your professional services will be paid for at the rate of $4 per diem, with an 
ra allowance of $1.50 for hotel expenses, exclusive of travelling fare. 

You are authorized, in case of acceptance, to employ an assistant at the rate of 
11.20, exclusive of his disbursements for board and travelling expenses. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. F. BAILLAIRGE, 

Assistant Chief Engineer, Dominion of Canada. 
exander Munro, Esq., 
Port Elgin, Westmorland County, 
New Brunswick. 



Port Elgin, Westmorland, April 15th, 1872. 

Sir. — In compliance with instructions from G. F. Baillairge, Esq., C. E., date 'I 
bh November, 1871, requesting me to proceed to Beaver Harbour, in the County of 
larlotte, New Brunswick, and take such measurements, levels and soundings as are 
[uisite to determine the best site for the construction of a breakwater ; and submit 
plan for the same, together with a report respecting the usefulness of the pro- 
sted work to the general interests of navigation. 

I beg leave to submit the following report and accompanying plan : 
The greater part of the shore line of Beaver Harbour is high and rocky and the 
mtry sterile and sparsely populated. The rocks contain several veins of sulphate 
•>f copper, which have been mined to a limited extent. 

The harbour teems with herring, cod, shad, mackerel and other useful fish 
The industry of the place is chiefly confined to fishing, employing ten schooners 
>f an aggregate of 241 tons and 21 boats. 

This harbour is well protected by high lands, except on the south side. The 
mly sheltered part from prevailing southerly winds, is on the west side oppo- 
se the village. 

This part of the harbour is sufiyiently capacious and safe to accommodate f he 
hipping owned in the place, but insufficient to accommodate the fleet of fishing und 
ther vessels which are compelled to take refuge there, in the event of southerly 
' )rms, 

The number of vessels that annually enter is variously estimated at from three 
lundred to five hundred. Three hundred and fifty, however, exclusive of local 
r essels, may be set down as the number that enter for shelter during the year. A 
rge part of these is from Nova Scotia. From five to fifteen square rigged vessels 
jtnd upwards of sixty schooners have been frequently seen in this harbour at a 
ime. 

The westerly passage is excellent for large class vessels, and the anchorage 
generally good. Easterly of this passage are three rocky shoals, marked on the 
in, which render navigation, on the east side, dangerous during storms. The 
*bour opposite the village is protected from southerly winds by a hill which is 
v feet in height j but the water near the shore is so shallow, that not more than half 
ie vessels, which enter the harbour at a^ time, can be protected from southerly 
orms. 

Consequently, a breakwater erected southerly of the village, extending from the 
ie of the hill, as shown on the plan, would be of great benefit to the general 
tterests of navigation. 

The cost of such a work would largely depend on the extent to which it may be 
itended to afford shelter to shipping. A breakwater 350 feet in length might b@ 

301 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883| 



erected, extending from the point named in the direction of Goal .Rock, for about 
four thousand dollars, the sum asked by the petitioners, and be of considerable 
service to the general interests of navigation. But what is really required is a 
breakwater 550 leet long, so as to afford shelter for one hundred vessels at least, 
which would cost more than double that amount. 

A profile view of the proposed breakwater is shown on the plan. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

ALEXANDEE MUNRO, 

Provincial Land Surveyor. 
The Honourable 

The Minister of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



No. 22,354. Ottawa, 22nd Apiil, 1872. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit you, herewith the plan and estimates of th 
proposed improvements at Shippagan Gully, according to the survey made under mj 
instructions, by Mr. Joseph Eosa, in November and December, 1871, together witl 
his report thereon, on the 2nd instant. 

Fortunately, the ice formed across the Gully, shortly after his arrival at Shippa 
gan ; this enabled him to sound the channel from Shippagan Harbour downward t» 
the southern end of the Gully, on the Gulf of St. Lawrence, more expeditiously, an< 
with greater exactness than if the operation bad been done in open water, on accoun 
of the rapid current passing through. 

The main obstacle to the passage of boats and vessels through the Gully, betweei 
the Gulf and the Baie des Chaleurs, is the shallowness of the water across the bar a 
the southern entrance or outlet of the Gully, and of the channel leading therefror 
north-westward to Shippagan Harbour. 

DESCRIPTION OF PRESENT CHANNEL. 

According to the plan now furnished, the upper portion of the channel, fro 
opposite the English Church of Shippagan, thence downward for 3,000 feet, 
obstructed by a shoal of sand and gravel, about 300 feet in width and 1,500 feet i 
length ; the depth of water on this shoal varies from 3£ to 7 feet, at extreme lo 
water : above this shoal the channel is from 600 feet to 800 feet in width ; on th 
western side of .the shoal, its width varies from 400 feet at the upper end, to 100 fe( 
at the lower end ; on the eastern side of the shoal, it varies from 200 feet near tt 
upper end, to 500 feet at the lower end ; the navigable depth of water in this port! 
of the channel, passing to the eastward of the shoal, is from fifteen to 18 feet. 

The continuation of the channel for a further distance of 5,500 feet, varies fj 
500 to 600 feet in width, and from 16^ to 20 feet in depth, towards Indian Point. 

Thence the channel is circuitous, and very irregular in width, until it reach* 
the bar at the southern outlet, 6,200 feet further ; this portion of the channel is froi 
500 to 150 feet wide, and from 10 to 18 feet deep. 

Over the bar the channel is about 200 feet in width, and from 6 J to 11 fe 
in depth. 

At 800 feet seaward it increases to a width of 600 feet, and diminishes to 
depth of If feet ; thence, at 700 feet further, it decreases to a width of 300 feet, arj 
increases in depth to 3£ feot; thence, it widens out to 600 feet, the depth varyii 
from2J to 10 feet at a distance of 700 feet more; thence, for a 1,000 feet further, | 
expands into the Gulf, where a depth of 15J feet is reached at a total distance 
3,200 feet in a south-westerly direction from the middle of the bar. 

302 



•tfc 
tic 

* 

3h( 



\ 



4C Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



The soundings shown on the plan, and those stated in this Roport, are referred 
to extreme low water spring tides. 

Bayfield, in describing the gully, states that the tide is generally extremely 
rapid in it, that the bar of sand at its southern outlet on the gulf dries in part at low 
water and shifts in heavy gales, but that there is generally a channel with 4 or 5 feet 
at low water across the bar, and that the tide rises from 3 to 5 feet, according as it 
may be neap or spring tides. The passage over the bar and into the gully is diffi- 
cult and dangerous to strangers, but is continually used by the native fishermen 
with their small schooner-rigged shallops. On his map, No. 2,686, published in 
1867, he shows the channel ot the gully passing between shoals of sand and mud, 
partly covered with weeds. 

According to observations made by Mr. Rosa, during his survey, the current 
runs from the gulf into the gully at \ ebb tide and out of it from the Baie des 
Chaleurs at \ flood tide. 

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS. 

As the class of vessels navigating the Baie des Chaleurs and the Gulf from 
Campbeilton toPictou requires a draught of from 12 to 15 feet, the latter has been 
taken as the basis of the improvements proposed. These consist in dredging a new 
channel on a straighter course than the present one, from opposite Iudian Point 
downward to the present channel across the sand bar, and thence through the old 
channel into the Gulf to a depth of 15 feet at extreme low water spring tides, in the 
direction shown by the red dotted lines, or in dredging the old channel throughout 
| to the same depth; the outlet into the Gulf in both cases, being protected by a 
breakwater upon its eastern side. 

The breadth of channel to be dredged should be 300 feet ; it might, however, 
I suffice for the present to reduce it to 150 feet, and to increase it hereafter to that 
'first stated. 

The construction of a breakwater at the Gulf outlet of the Gully is necessary in 
order to prevent the filling up of the dredged channel by sand during easterly or 
south-easterly winds. 

The total length of the new channel, which it is proposed to dredge, is 7,75$ 
i feet. 

The total length of the breakwater required is 2,600 feet. 

In addition to the above works, it will be necessary to protect the eastern end 
I of the bar for 1,100 feet or more, against the action of the sea, by means of stakes 
and brush, across what is known as the East Gully, wherein the depth of water at 
low tide is from 1 to 3 feet ; this mode of protection which it appears has been 
adopted on other parts of the bar will cause the sea-sand to accumulate in the breach, 
land prevent the water of the Gully from washing it out. 



ESTIMATES* 

The probable cost of the projected works is shown by the various estimates 
appended to Mr. Rosa's Report. It varies from $310,718 to 8103,550, according t& 
the location and dimensions of the channel to be dredged, and the mode of construct- 
ing the breakwater. 

The latter may be constructed on the present bed of the Gulf shore, at 50 feat 
from the side of the dredged channel, or it may be sunk to the same depth as the 
bed of the new channel. The former mode has been tried with success, 
I am told, at three harbours in ^-Newfoundland, in localities similar to the outlet of 
Shippagan Gully. The latter mode, which is certainly the safest, will, in the present 
instance, add $68,000 to the cost of the work, 

303 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A, 1883 



OBJECT OF PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS. 

The main advantages to be gained by the projected improvements of Shippagan i.j 
Gully, are as follows, viz. : — 

1st. The dangerous route around Miscou Island, at the south-eastern extremity of II 
the Eaie des Chaleurs would be avoided. 

2nd. The distance from the Gulf ports along the shore, extending from Pictou to [1 
Miramichi, and from those of Prince Edward Island to those on the Baie des Chaleurs 
from Shippegan on the south shore and Port Daniel on the north shore, to Campbell- i 
ton at the head of the Bay, will be shortened about 50 miles. 

3rd. The Gully, as stated by Capt. Leach, of the " Eothesay Castle" steamer (No. 
14,724), would serve as a harbour of refuge for the storm-tossed fishermen who should I 
happen to be caught out near Point Miscou by a north-east gale, as there is no har- 
bour that a vessel can make in a north-east gale south of Point Miscou, nearer than '■ 
Shediac, distant 150 miles. 

4th , The recurrence of such a serious loss of life as that which occurred in 1857, 1 
when seventy lives were lost, because the fishing shallops and vessels could not enter' 
the Gully owing to the shallowness of the water and the want of a breakwater at the ! 
entrance, would be avoided. 

Attached to Mr. Eosa's report you will find the answers to a series of questions' 
which I thought it useful to prepare, respecting the population, trade, resources,!!! 
prices of lumber, stone, &c, number of fishing vessels, prevailing winds, and the clos-ll 
ing and opening of navigation at each of the harbours, I was instructed to examine!!: 
in the Maritime Provinces, last year, as per No. 11,055, Sub. 991, dated 4th July, 
1871. 

Eeturned herewith are references Nos. 10,304, 14,724, of 5th April, 1870, and | 
21st February, 1871, from Hon. T. "W. Anglin and J. Ferguson, enclosing a petition I 
from merchants and ship-owners ; also, No. 14,795, of 24th April, 1871, containing 
J. E. Boyd's report, with one of Bayfield's charts of the locality to be improved. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 

G. II. BAILLAIEGE, 

Assistant Chief Engineer. 
F. Braun, Esq,, 

Secretary of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



Ottawa, 2nd April, 1872. 

Sir, —In compliance with your instructions of November, 1871, 1 have the hon 
to report that I proceeded to Shippagan, in New Brunswick, to take soundings in the; 
Gully, and to estimate the cost of dredging a channel 15 feet deep at low water, in» 
order to give a shorter route to the steamers plying between Campbellton and Pictou,j 
and to permit the schooners and other fishing crafts to seek for shelter during a galej 
in Shippagan harbour, by passing through the Gully. 

The entrance to Shippagan harbour, at its mouth on the Gulf ot St. Lawrence 
is obstructed by a sand bar, or down ("dune") formed by east and south-east winds 
The currents have increased the down at the interior of the Gully. 

As there are only 2 to 5 feet of water on this sand bar at low water, and a* 
the slightest wind causes the sea to break thereon, it is impossible even for fishing 
crafts to cross it. 

Between Miscou and Miramichi, a distance of about eighty-five miles,' there is nc 
harbor whero steamers, schooners, or smaller boats caught by a storm, can seel 
shelter. As Shippagan harbour is about mid-way between these two places, it wouk; 
bo advantageous to the interests of the coasting trade and navigation, if the channel 
of the Gully is deepened, widened and straightened, so as to give access to the har' 

304 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1885 



bour ; it would also be necessary to dredge a channel through the sand bar or down, 
at the southern extremity of the gully, and to build a breakwater on the east side of 
the dredged channel in order to prevent the sea, when the wind blows from the 
east or south-east, from filling it up with sand. 

If these improvements were made, the Gulf steamers and the schooners leaving 
Campbellton and other ports along the Baie des Chaleurs, for Miramachi, Shediac, 
Baie Yerte, Pictou, and other ports of New Brunswick, would pass inside Miscou Island, 
through Sbippagan harbour and out by the Gully ; thus the dangers of Miscou Island 
Point would be avoided, and the distance shortened forty-five to fifty miles. 

So as to give you an approximate estimate of the cost of deepening the channel 
to fifteen feet at low water, I sounded three lines nearly parallel to each other, two 
and a-half miles long, starting opposite Shippagan Church and running as far as the 
outlet of the Gully, and then sounded along that same distance, and across the Gully, 
seven lines measuring 2,000 to 2,500 feet long. I also sounded five other lines outside 
the Gully to a depth of twenty feet of water. The length of these lines varied from 
3,500 to 3,900 feet. All those soundings, from Shippagan Church to the outlet of the 
gully, were taken through the ice. 

I also made a survey on the east side of the Gully, so as to show the position of 
the channel and the sounding lines. 

With the present Eeport I transmit you a plan of the Gully, so as to show the 
soundings, the proposed breakwater, etc. On the plan, the present channel is indi- 
cated by two red dotted lines. 

Herewith you will find — 

1st. An estimate of the cost of dredging a channel 300 feet at the bottom and 
fifteen feet deep at low water ; another estimate for a channel 150 feet wide. 

2nd. An estimate of the cost of dredging the present channel 300 feet wide at 
the bottom, and 15 feet deep at low water ; and another estimate for the widening 
of the present channel to 150 feet. 

3rd. Two estimates of the cost of the breakwater : the first for a breakwater to 
be constructed on the dredged bottom, and the second for one to be constructed on 
the present bottom at about fifty feet to the east of the proposed channel. 

4th. A summary of the preceding estimates. 

5th. Questions respecting Shippagan Harbour, and answers to the same by the 
ncipal inhabitants of the place. 

6th. Questions and answers respecting the cost of materials for the construe- 
n of the breakwater. 



The whole humbly submitted. 



I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your humble and obedient servant, 

JOSEPH EOSA. 



F. Baillairg£, Esq., 

Assistant Chief Engineer, 

Department of Public Works. 



»pboxim vte Estimate of the cost of dredging a channel 15 feet deep at low water 
in Shippagan Gully and through the sand-bar or "dune" at the southern 
extremity of the Gully. 

Dredging a channel 300 feet wide at the bottom and 
15 feet deep at lew water='747,300 cubic yards 

at 25c. per yard $185,825 00 

Dredging for a channel 150 feet wide at the bottoms 

363,419 cubic yards at 25c. per yard 90,854 75 

305 
10 a— 20 



4:6 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Approximate Estimate of the cost of dredging the present channel of Shippagan 
Gully and the sand-bar or " dune " at the southern extremity of the Gully to: 
15 feet at low water. 

Dredging the present channel to a depth of 15 feet 
at low water and to a width of 300 feet at the 
bottom=420,608 cubic yards at 25c. per yard.... $105,152 00 

Dredging the present channel to a width of 150 feet 
at the bottom=2 14,482 cubic yards at 25c. per 
yard..... 53,620 50 

Approximate Estimate of the construction of a breakwater, at the southerr 
extremity of Shippagan Gully, 2,600 feet long, 20 feet wide at the top, with a|l 
slope of 1 in 12 feet on the western side, and J in 1 foot on the eastern side. 

For a breakwater constructed on the dredged bottom= 

65,000 cubic yards at $1.50 per yard « $11*7,000 00 

Add the dredging at the site of the breakwater= 

27,572 cubic yards at 25c. per yard 6,893 00 

$123,893.00 
For a breakwater built on the present bottom in 12 
feet of water at low water=:30,516 cubic yards 
at $1.80 per yard 54,928 80 

Summary of the three preceding estimates : — 

For a channel 300 feet wide at the bottom, and a break- 
water built on the dredged bottom $310,718 00 

For a channel 300 feet wide at the bottom, and a break- 
water built on the present bottom ... 241,753 80 

For a channel 150 feet wide at the bottom, and a break- 
water built on the dredged bottom 214,747 75 

For a channel 150 feet wide at the bottom, and a break- 
water built on the present bottom 145,783 55 

To dredge the present channel 300 feet wide at the 
bottom, and 15 feet deep, and build a breakwater 
on the dredged bottom 229,045 00 

To dredge the present channel 300 feet wide at the 
bottom, and 15 feet deep, and build a breakwater 
on the present bottom 160,080 80 

To dredge the present channel 150 feet wide and 15 
feet deep, and build a breakwater on the dredged 
bottom ,. 177,513 50 

To dredge the present channel 150 feet wide and 15 
feet deep, and build a breakwater on the present 
bottom 108,549 30 

SHIPPAGAN. 

QUESTIONS RESPECTING HARBOUR. 

1. Population ? 

2. Exports consist of? Tons of? 

3. Imports consist of ? Tons of ? 

4. Exports generally sent to ? 

5. Imports generally sent from ? 

6. Salmon taken in river ? Quantity ? 

7. Number of vessels frequenting harbour ? 

306 I 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



8. Tonnage of vessels frequenting harbour ? 

9. Number of vessels loading in harbour ? 

10. Greatest draught of water of largest vessels loaded ? 

11. Fish ? Quantity of each taken and exported ? 

12. Minerals consist of ? 

13. Agricultural products consist of ? 

14. Prevailing winds, Spring ? Summer ? Autumn ? 

15. Winds causing heaviest sea at entrance of harbour ? 

16. Ice takes in inside of harbour ? 
IT. Ice takes in outside of harbour ? 

18. Harbour clear of ice inside ? 

19. Harbour clear of ice outside ? 

20. Bottom of harbour, inside, clay, sand, gravel, or rock ? 

21. Bottom of harbour, outside, clay, sand, gravel, or rock ? 

22. Number of vessels, size, etc., owned in harbour ? 

23. Number of fishiag boats owned in harbour ? 

24. Inner harbour capable of sheltering how many vessels of heaviest draught ? 

25. Length, width, depth, name of river emptying into harbour ? 
20. Fog ? 

27. Sea worms ? 

28. Number of American vessels fishing off the coast ? 

29. Where do they go for shelter in north-east gales ? 

30. Where do they go for shelter in south-west gales ? 

31. Which wind causes mouth of river or gully to fill with sand the quickest 
enerally ? 

32. Which wind will clear mouth of river the soonest, generally ? 

33. What wind clears out the entrance most ? 

34. What is the best shelter the harbour affords as it is ? 

35. What class of steamer would be placed on the route through Shippagan 
ully if it is deepened to a depth of 18 feet ? 

36. What is the greatest width of channel that is required for steamboats and 
els navigating the Baie des Chaleurs ? 

ANSWERS TO GENERAL QUESTIONS, RESPECTING SHIPPAGAN HARBOUR, GLOUCESTER 
COUNTY, GULP OF ST. LAWRENCE, NEW BRUNSWICK. 

1. Population, about 2,000. 

2. Exports consists principally of dry codfish. 

3. Imports consist of British merchandise and fishery outfits, including British 
It, also foreign salt. 

4. Exports are generally sent to the United Kingdom and Europe. 

5. Imports are generally from Great Britainjand Jersey, with salt from Naples 
id Cadiz. 

6. No salmon taken. 
# 7. About twenty vessels frequent harbour, including those employed only 

thin the Dominion. 

8. The tonnage cannot be given precisely, as many of the class of vessels, alluded 
above, are nut noticed officially ; but the total tonnage of vessels, visiting the 
rbor, would probably be 1,300. Vessels employed in the fish trade here are not 
a large size. 

9. Six vessels of 754 tonnage are loaded in the harbour with exports beyond 
Dominion. 

10. The greatest draught of water of vessels in the harbour is 18 feet, but ships 
iwing 20 feet have loaded here with lumber some years since. 

11. The quantity offish taken is about 16,680 quintals or cwt., besides several 
msand barrels of pickled herrings and alewives, which boing generally shipped to 
tlifax or other ports within the Dominion, cannot be called exported. 

301 
10 a— 20£ 



4G Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



J 2. No minerals . 

13. Agricultural products consist of potatoes and other vegetables. Hay, wheat! 
barley, pease, buck wheat and oats. 

14. Winds in spring are various : in summer, southerly ; in autumn, west 
south-west and north-west. 

15. Winds causing the heaviest sea, east-south-east and south. 

16. Ice takes permanently inside of harbour about 1st December. 

17. Ice outside of harbour about 1st January, but not stationary, and som^ 
winters the ice moves off and toward the land all winter, according to the wind. 

18. Harbour gets clear of ice inside generally between the 28th April and 61 
May ; but at the south entrance about ten days earlier. 

19. When westerly and northerly winds prevail the ice frequently clears off th< 
coast about the middle of March, and may return with a contrary wind ; but unk 
there is an extraordinary prevalence of easterly winds, the ice is generally quitj 
cleared away on the Gulf side bv the 15th April. 

20. (Sand). 

21. (Sand). 

22. There are three schooners owned in harbour, of 120 tons. There are, howevei 
large shares held in ships belonging to the Island of Jersey. 

23. There are about 150 large fishing boats not decked, and ten small decke<| 
schooners, comprising about 240 tons. 

24. The inner harbour is capable of sheltering about 500 vessels. 

25. There is no river, excepting a small stream at the head of St. Simon's. 

26. Fog is of very rare occurrence indeed. 

27. Sea-worms, if there are any hero, are not known to do any damages here. 

28. American vessels fishing off the coast average 300 sails. 

29. Where vessels go for shelter in north-oast gales depends much on thei 
position at the time ; generally to Prince Edward Island, the mouth of Miramichj 
Little Shippagan, or the shelter of the Island of Miscou. 

30. Where vessels go for shelter in south-west gales depends much on theil 

Position at the time ; generally to Prince Edward Island, the mouth of Miramichi 
tittle Shippagan, or the shelter of the Island of Miscou. 

31. Winds causing gully to fill with sand are northeast by east, and south-eas 

32. The wind which clears sand from mouth of the river or gully the quickei 
is north-west. 

33. The wind which clears sand from entrance is north-west. 

34. The shelter afforded by the harbour is nearly complete with any wind ; j 
may not be quite so good with north wind, but even then there is a spacious arj 
excellent shelter in the St. Simon's Inlet, with 18 or 20 feet of water. 

35. Cannot say what class of steamers would be put on the route if Shippagaj 
Gully was deepened to 18 feet depth. 

36. Do snot know the greatest width of channel required for vessels navigatii 
the Baie des Gkaleurs. 

U.B. — Havias^ examined the within answers, we approve of them. 

WILLIAM TAYLOE, 

Merchant 

P. J. N. DUMAEESQ, 

Collector of Customs. 

WILLIAM IEYING & Co., 
Merchants. 



308 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



General Questions respecting Prices of Lumber at Shippagan Harbour. 



'rice of 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



square timber... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
round timber... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

d6 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
tatted timber... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do .*. 

do 
snubbing posts. 

do 

do 
3-inch plank... 

do 

do 
stone delivered 
iron do 



Name of 
Wood. 



Pine 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

do 

Yellow Birch. 

do 

do 

Maple 

do , 

do 

Pine , 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

d« 

Yellow Birch. 

do 

do 

Maple 

do 

do 

Fir 

do 

do 

do 

Spruce 

d© 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

do 

do 

Yellow Birch. 

Oak 

Tamarack 

Pine 

Spruce 

Hemlock 



Size. 



Inches. 



X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

inches at small end... 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

inches thick 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

inches diameter 

do 

do 



Length. 



feet long, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Per ton. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Per stick. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Per M.F.B.M, 
do • 
do 
Per ton. 
do 



N.B. — If any of the above materials cannot be procured in the locality, state where they can be 
irehased, and at what price . 

G. F. BAILLAIRG& 

Assistant Chief Engineer Public Works. 



309 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1885 



Answers to General Questions respecting Prices of Lumber, Shippagan Harbour 
Gloucester County, Gulf of St. Lawrence, New Brunswick, 



Square timber... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Round timber. .. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Flatted timber.. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Snubbing posts. 

do 

do 

Three inch , 

do 

do 



Name 
of Wood. 



Pine 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

do 

Yellow birch 

do 
do 

Maple 

do 

do 

Pine 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

do 

Yellow birch .,,., 
do 
do 

Maple 

do ........ 

do 

Fir 

do 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

do 

do 

Yellow birch 

Oak (none) 

Tamarac (none) 

Pine plank 

Spruce 

Hemlock 



Size. 



12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 
12 X 


Inches. 
12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 

12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 


12 



14 inches at small end.. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



6 inches thick. 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

G 

6 

6 



do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do ....... 

do 

do 

do 

16 inches, diameter. 
16 do 

16 do 



Length. 



30 feet long, per ton. 



25 
20 
30 

25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



30 feet long, per stick. 



25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
15 
30 
25 
20 
15 
30 
25 
20 
15 
10 
10 
10 
PerM.F.B.M, 

do 

do 



do 

rlo 

( y) 
'.O 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Price. 



Stone : Not known exactly, but would be cheap. 
Iron : Cannot say. 



(Signed) 



To Joseph Rosa, C.E., 

No. 6, Queen St., Quebec. 



Wm. TAYLOR, 

Merchant, 

Wm. FRUING & Co., 

P. I. N. DUMARESG, 

Collector of Customs. 



310 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 188$ 



Public Works, 

Ottawa, 11th May, 1872. 

Sir. — The Minister desires you to transmit as soon as possible a list of the 
Harbours you have visited last year, stating in a few lines what is required to be done, 
and the cost approximately of the work at each place. 

It is also advisable that Mr. Steckel should come with the papers having refer* 
encc to|the several works. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. BPAUN, 

Secretary,, 
F. Baillairge, Esq., 
Assistant Engineer, Public Works Department. 
Cedars. 



Cedars, 22nd July, 1872. 
Braun, Esq., 
Secretary, Public Works, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit you herewith the original plans, profiles and 
jtions of the projected harbour improvements in Nova Scotia at : — 
South Ingonish, Victoria County, Cape Breton Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, 
*ort Williams or Port Lome, County of Annapolis, Bay of Fundy, Metoghan, 
* ranty of Digby. St. Mary's Bay. 

At South Ingonish, according to borings taken with an iron rod 1 J inches 
imeter, the bed of the channel to be excavated through the G-ut, appears to be 
>vered with a compact mass of gravel, sand and boulders, through which the rod 
jnetrated about 7 feet at the north end near the pond — 3 feet midway between the 
md and the sea —and 2J feet at the south end, on the sea shore line. 

At Port Williams, the profile of the beach under the proposed pier extension is 
iven approximately, as I could not level it while there last winter. 

At Metegoan, the repairs and raising of the East Pier and the extonsion of the 
r est Pier, southward to the bridge, although indicated on the plan, are not embraced 
the estimate previously furnished, being works of secondary importance. 
According to local information, the description and cost of building materials to 
I be procured at each of the above localities may be stated as follows : — 

South Ingonish. 

Square timber, Pine, Spruce, Birch are scarce. 

12" x lis" 25 to 30 ft. long per ton 7 to 8 00 

Square timber, Hemlock, said to be plentiful 

12" x 12", 25 to 30 ft. long " 4 00 

Pound Hemlock, 14" at small end, sticks 25 to 

30 ft. long per stick 2 to 3 00 

Flatted Hemlock or Fir for top covering, 

15 ft, long, 6" thick per 100 lineal ft. 2 50 

30 " " " 3 00 

Three-inch;Pine]Plank per M.F.B.M. VI 00 

" Spruce " " 8 00 

Snubbing Posts, Yellow Birch, rough, 15" 

diameter, 10 ft. long each 50 

Stone delivered (boulders) per ton 25 

Iron, for bolts, (including $1.20 for freight) " 49 00 

311 

• 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188S 



Port Williams. 

Spruce timber is the most abundant ; other timbers are scarce. 

$ eta. 

Square timber, Spruce, 12" x 12", 30 ft. long.. ..per stick 3 00 

" " 12" x 12", 25 " " . 2 50 
Eound " " 14" smallest diameter, 25 to 30 

ft. long per stick 2 00 

« « « 20 " " 1 50 

Flatted " " 6" thick, 25 to 30 ft. long " 40 

" Fir, 6" " 20 « " . 30 

" " 6" " 15 " " . 25 
Spruce or Yellow Birch for snubbing posts, 16" diameter, 

10 ft. long o.per stick 1 50 

Three-inch Spruce Plank M.F.B.M. 9 00 

" Yellow Birch Plank " 16 00 

Stone, delivered (Boulders) per ton 25 

Iron for bolts .... " 48 00 

Meteghan. 

Pine timber is scarce. 

Square timber, Spruce, 12" x 12", 20 to 30 ft. long, per ton 4 to 5 00 
" <* Hemlock, 12" x 12", 20 to 30 ft. long « 3 to 4 00 

Eound " Spruce and Hemlock, 10" diameter at 

small end, 20 to 30 ftw long per ton 3 00 

Flatted Spruce, 6" thick M.F.B.M. 10 00 

Stone from beach per ton 25 

Wrought Iron from St John " 45 00 

" double refined 100 lbs. 2 50 

Three-inch Spruce Plank M.F.B.M. 8 00 

Spruce logi, 16" diameter, 10 ft. long each 1 00 

" 10" " 25 ." for outside protec- 
tion of wharf.. each 1 00 

Top covering, Spruce 6" thick sup. ft. 06 

As square timber 12 x 12 of any description is generally scarce, it would 
advisable to allow timber of smaller dimensions in the works to be constructed! 
The timber most generally used in the works, I examined last year, may be average*! 
at 10 inches. 

Plans of the other harbours will be forwarded as soon as completed. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. F. BAILLAIRGtf, 

Assistant Chief Engineer Public Works* 



For complete list of plans furnished and dates thereof see next sheet. 



312 



, 46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 188S 



List of Plans furnished. 



l 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

IP 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 

28 

29 
30 



Names of Harbours, ke. 



Bearer Harbour , 

Shippagan Gully , 

Aspee Bay 

South Iugonish 

Grande Anse 

Cheticamp Harbour. 

Margarie Harbour v . 

Chimney Corner Harbtur 

Wallace River profile 

Parrsborough Pier 

Maitland 

Oak Point 

Well's Cove , 

Baxter's Harbour , 

Hall's Harbour 

Canada Creek 

Harborville 

Morden or French Cross 

Little Clam Cove 

Port Williams or Port Lome 

Margaretville 

River Sisflibea ~ 

Meteghan 

Digby Pier 

Green Cove or Maitland 

Yarmouth 

Grand River 

Cape George (McNair's Cove) 

Prepared by S. B. Boyd, 7th Aug., 1871. 

Ragged Head 

Larry's Harbour 

Brooklyn 



When 
Furnished. 



April 15, 1872, 
April 22, 1872. 
August 27, 1872. 
July 22, 1872. 
August 27, 1872. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
August 26, 1871, 
August 27, 1872. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July 22, 1872. 
August 27, 1872, 

do 
July 22, 1872, 
August 27, 1872. 

do 

do 



August 7,1871, 

August 27, 1872, 

do 
August 24, 1871. 



County. 



Charlotte 

Gloucester... 

Victoria 

do 

Inverness 

do 

do 

do 

Cumberland., 
do 

Hants 

Kings 

do .. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Annapolis .... 

do 
Digby 

do ?."".'..".'! 
Yarmouth .... 

do 
Richmond .... 
Antigonish . . 

Guysborough 

do 
Queen's 



Province. 



New Brunswick. 

do 
Nova Scotia. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

d« 

do 

do 

do - 

d« 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

da 

do 

do 
do 
do 



313 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



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(6 Victoria, 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



W. side of S. end of Mines Basin 

or Minas, and at outlet of 

Avon River. 

S.E. side Mines or Minas channel 

and Bay of Fundy. 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

do do 

E. side St. Mary's Bay, at mouth 

of Bay. 
N.E. side St. Mary's Bay, about 

midway up Bay. 
At lower or S.W. end of Anna- 
polis Basin. 
At southern end of Nova Scotia, 

on Atlantic Ocean, 
do do 
At S.E. end of Cape Breton, on 

Atlantic Ocean. 
At outlet of Bras d'Or Lake, on 

S. coast of Cape Breton. 
W. side of St. George's Bay, 

Northumberland Strait. 
S. side and towards lower end 

Northumberland Strait. 
At lower or S.E. end of Strait 

of Canso. 
N.W. side of Chedabucto Bay. 
At W. or upper end of Cheda- 

bwto Bay. 
On South coast of Nova Scotia, 

Atlantic Ocean. 
On S.W. coast of Nova Scotia, 

Atlantic Ocean. 
Opposite S.W. coast of Nova 

Scotia, Atlantic Ocean. 












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Bennett's Cove 

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Margaretville 

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315 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



General Questions addressed by the undersigned to various parties, in each locality, 
during time of examination, respecting Harbours, Maritime Provinces, 
referred to in this Eeport : — 

1. Population of town or village in 18*71 ? 
Population of county ? 

2. Exports consist of? Tons of? 

3. Imports? 

4. Exports generally sent to ? 

5. Imports generally from ? 

6. Salmon, shad, herring, mackerel, or any other fish taken? Average 
■quantity per year, and where taken ? 

7. Number of vessels frequenting harbour per year ? 

8. Tonnage? 

9. Number of vessels loaded in harbour per year ? 

10. Greatest draught of water of largest vessels loaded ? 

11. Fish. What quantity exported ? 

12. Minerals consist of? 

13. Agricultural products consist of? 

14. Prevailing winds, spring, summer, autumn? 

15. Wind causing heaviest sea at entrance of harbour ? 

16. Ice forms inside of harbour or pier ? 
IT. Ice forms outside of harbour or pier ? 
18. Harbour clear of ice inside ? 

20. Bottom of harbour inside of pier, sand, gravel, rock or mud ? 

21. Bottom of harbour outside of pier, sand, gravel, rock or mud ? 

22. Number of vessels, size, owned in harbour? 

23. Number of fishing boats? 

24. Harbour capable of sheltering how many vessels of heaviest draught at higk 
•water ? At low water ? 

25. Length, breadth, depth, name of river emptying into harbour? Above or 
below pier, if any ? 

26. Fog ? How often ? What months the worst ? 

2*7. Seaworms ? Any to injure piers ? To what extent ? 

28. Number of vessels or boats fishing off coast ? 

29. Where do they go for shelter in south-east gales or other gales ? 

30. Where do they go for shelter in south-west gales or other gales ? 

31. What wind causes harbour to fill with sand ? Inside of pier, or outside ? 

32. What wind clears the sand away inside? or outside? 

33. What wind prevents entrance into harbour? or out of it? 

34. What is the best shelter the harbour, or pier, if any, affords as it is ? And 
if there be no shelter, where should a pier or breakwater be placed, and in what 
direction of the compass, to afford the most shelter and accommodate the greatest 
number of vessels ? 

35. Any pier or breakwater near harbour, and at what distance ? 

36. Does mail steamer, or any other steamer, call at pier or otherwise ? Where 
from, and how often? and with what draught of w.^er ? 

37. Do any other vessels call at pier? Of what tonnage? For what purpose ? 
And how many per year ? 

38. When was pier originally built ? Its cost ? 

39. When was pier repaired ? Cost of repairs ? 

40. By whom was pier built ? Or repaired ? 

41. At what stage of tide can steamers or other vessels land at pier? Witk 
what draught of water ? 

H| 42. When end of pier is dry at low water where do vessels wait ? And how 
long before they can land at it ? 

316 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



43. For what purpose is pier or breakwater proposed to be built? And at what 
point would it be most serviceable to general navigation and commercial interests? 

44. What depth of water is required at end of proposed pier ? 

45. Can none of the existing piers be used, and, if not, why? 

46. Jf pier is constructed or harbour otherwise improved, will local authorities 
furnish a road to pier or contribute towards construction of work ? 

4*7. What sum is expected to be furnished towards construction of proposed 
work by the Local Legislature, Company, or otherwise? 

48. Is proposed pier or breakwater likely to be injured by floating ice or other- 
wise ? 

49. Is channel likely to fill up after it is dredged, and why ? 

50. Is harbour likely to fill up inside or outside of landing pier or breakwater, 
and why ? and what is the best mode of preventing such filling up, according to past 
observation ? 

51. How many vessels built per year? What register tonnage ? 

52. Pier Company ? If any, when incorporated ? For how large a revenue ? 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

N. B. — Any further information that may be useful in reference to the subject 
can be added alter the last question is answered. 

All answers should be made on separate sheets, and numbered the same as tho 
questions. 

Any question not applying to any particular harbour can be noted on the sheets 
©f answers by making a cross or star prefixed to the number. 



Gc. F. BAILLAIEGE, 

Assistant Chief Engineer of Public Works. 



311 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.) 



A. 1883 



General Questions respecting Prices of Lumber, Maritime Provinces. 



Name of 
Wood. 



Square timber 

do 

do 

do. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Round timber ... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Snubbing posts... 

do 

do 
Top covering, &c 

do 

do 
Stone delivered 
Iron do 



Pine 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 
do 
Yellow Birch, 
do 
do 

Manle 

do 



do 

Pine 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do 

do 

Hemlock 

do 

do 

Yellow Birch 
do 
do 

Maple 

do 

do 

Fir 

do 

do 

do 

Spruce 

do . 

do 

do 

Hemlock , 

do 
do 
do 
Yellow Birch 

Oak 

Tamarack — 
Pine Plank.... 

Spruce , 

Hemlock 



Size. 



Inches. 



X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 ; 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

X 12 

diameter at small end, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

thick flatted 

do , 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

diameter 

do 

do 

thick 

do 

do 



Length. 



Feet. 

30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
30 
25 
20 
15 
30 
25 
20 
15 
30 
25 
20 
15 
10 
10 
10 



Per ton 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Per stick 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do . .... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Each 

do 

do 

Per M.F., B.M 

do 

do 

Per ton ......... 

do 



What Price. 



1 ton of timber equal to 40 cubic feet. 
1 ton of stone equal to £ cubic yard. 

N.B. — If any of the above materials cannot be procured in the locality, state where they can 
purchased, and at what price, delivered on the work. 

The description of the various harbours from A to Z, inclusive, and the answers to the Gene 
Questions respecting each harbour and the prices of materials in each locality, appended to the original, 
have not been published, being too voluminous. 



G. F. BAILLAIRGB, 

Assistant Chief Engineer of Publu 
318 



Works. 



16 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



I 



APPENDIX No. 5. 



REPORT ON THE PROJECTED 

OF REFUGE BETWEEN RIMOUSKI A8D FATHER POINT. 

On the South Shore of the St. Lawrence, below Quebec. 

BY 

Formerly Assistant Chief Engineer, now Deputy of the 
Minister of Public Works. 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



(No. 12,295.) 

APPENDIX No. 5. 



REPORT ON PROPOSED HARBOUR OF REFUGE BETWEEN RIMOUS] 

AND FATHER POINT. 

Ottawa, 11th April, 1S72. 

Sir, —I have the honour to submit you the following Report on the propos< 
harbour of refuge on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, at a place accessible 
Transatlantic steamers and the Intercolonial Railway. 

The survey ordered by your letter, dated 29th April, 1870, was commenced 
July and finished on the £3rd of November of the same year, and the plan was trans 
mitted to you on the 21st of March, 1811. 

This plan comprises the portion of the river between the head of the Island ol 
St. Barnabe and the Parish of St. Luce, three-quarters of a mile below Father Poinl 

According to the survey that was made and the information obtained in th(| 
locality and elsewhere, the only sites suitable are Pointe a Pouliot and Father Point) 
Their relative advantages can be judged of by referring to the place and by th« 
following : — 

pointe 1 POULI®T. 

In order to obtain a depth of 26 feet of water at low tide, it will be necessary 
construct a pier 3,800 feet in length, in a direction N. 35° 10' W. ; to obtain a dep 
of 32 feet, the length will be about 4,500 feet. 

This pier would be protected against the winds from the south, and west-south 
west by tbe Island of St. Barnabe. This island will give but little shelter against th< 
west winds. 

A wing of 800 feet, running S. 70° W. at the northern extremity of the pierj 
will protect vessels against the north winds. 

During the high winds from the east, north-east, north-west and west, the waveii 
which break upon the pier would rebound over it, and render its approach dangerou 
and extremely difficult, unless a second pier was constructed on the east or west sid< 
of it, which would be too expensive. 

It is probable that Transatlantic steamers would not stop at this pier, as it woul< 
be out of their usual route. Moreover, during the high winds from the east, northj 
east and north, or during times of fog or snow, steamers would be afraid to pass to 
near the shoals of the Island of St. Barnabe, which are in proximity to the route thejj 
must follow on starting from or arriving at the pier. 

FATHER POINT. 

A pier placed here, in a north-westerly direction, which is the most favourabl 
would attain a depth of 26 feet of water at low tide at the end of 1,700 feet, and 1 
depth of 32 feet at the end of 2,170 feet, but it wou 1 be more exposed to the actio] i 
of the waves, the sea, and the floating ice, than at Pointe a Pouliot. 

In order that the Transatlantic steamers or other large vessels might be able t! I 
stop here, or elsewhere, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence, at any time, ij 3 
would be necessary to construct two piers, to a depth of at least 32 feet of water Bll 
low tide, in such a manner as to form a harbour, where they might enter either fo - 
shelter or to embark or disembark passengers and freight. 

320 






16 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1833 



The formation of such a harbour, accessible to all vessels without their encount- 
ering any shoals on their route and which might be easily connected with the 
intercolonial Railway by means of a branch line of about one and three-fourths 
jniles in length, can be made at Father Point more easily, and with less expense, 
;han elsewhere, by constructing the necessary piers in the position indicated by the 
ed lines on the plan. 

The west pier weuld have a length of 2,170 feet, and the east pier a length of 
!,220 feet. The space between these two piers would be protected on the south side 
>y the shore, where there is a lighthouse and telegraph office, and on the north side 
;>y wings running east and west, for a length of iiSi) feet, in such a manner as to 
eave a passage of about 300 feet towards the centre of the basin . 

From west to east, this basin would have a breadth of 1,660 feet, in 32 feet depth 
■f water, of 2,300 feet in a depth of 20 feet, and of 2,600 feet in a depth of 10 feet, 
tiring extreme low water ; from north to south, or from the entrance to the shore, 
ere would be a distance of 900 feet between the line of 32 feet of water and that of 
feet, — of 450 feet between this and the line of 10 feet, of 350 feet between 
bis line and that of low water, and of 1,000 feet between this last line and that 
fhigh water, opposite the fork of the high road leading to the town of Bimouski, 
) the lighthouse, and to St. Luce; the distance from the line of low water to 
he rocky point, where the lighthouse is situated, is about 200 feet. 

The piers forming this harbour would be exposed to all winds, but when the 
raves would break upon one of them, the pier on the opposite side would not suffer, 
nd the vessels in the harbor, or seeking its shelter, would always be in safety. 

It might he objected that the ice forming between the piers in winter, not being 
roken to pieces by the winds, or carried away by the current, will not disappear 
efore the month of May, or later. This is true, and would be the case at every 
ther locality on the south shore of the St. Lawrence where an enclosed harbor 
tight be constructed. 

The difficulty, however, might be partly obviated by leaving an opening through 
wllie eastern and western piers of the basin, towards the north end of the basin ; this 
rjjould also facilitate the entrance and departure of vessels frequenting the harbour. 
At Father Point the outside of the piers will probably bo free from ice nine and 
half to ten months out of twelve. 

Transatlantic steamers and other vessels could arrive in safety at this harbour 
m the 1st of April to the 15th of December every year, and often before and after 
le two dates. 

At Quebec navigation does not open generally before the 25th of April, and it 
es towards the 25th of November. 



RIMOUSKI PIER. 

In the event of its being asked, could not this pier be utilized for the purpose in 
jew, my answer would be as follows : — 

It would be necessary to prolong this pier to a further distance of 8,300 feet to 
L in a depth of twenty six feet, and of 8,750 feet to attain a depth of 32 feet of 
ter, at low water, if it extended in its present direction. 

The shortest distance from the extremity of the pier, to find the same depths of 
tor, is 5,1 a northerly direction, which is the worst on account of the winds from 
north and east ; in this case it would be necessary to lengthen the pier 5,300 feet 
attain a depth of twenty-six feet, and 7,000 feet to attain a depth of thirty-two feet 
- Jjlow water. 

Steamers or other vessels could not approach it except in calm weather. 
In its present state this pier is about 2,150 feet long, with a depth of water of 
tin«,Jf en to eight and a half feet at its northern extremity, during low water of spring 
ues. 

321 
10 a -21 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883' 



PREVAILING WINDS OF EACH SEASON. 

According to the observations of Admiral Bayfield, the winds the most frequent , 
and of longest duration are the east winds in the spring. The west winds blow ! 
occasionally towards the approach of summer when they are succeeded by the south- j 
west wind, which becomes the prevailing wind nearly the whole of the summer, in; 
all parts of the river and gulf ; the wind comes lightly from the south, from time to! 
time, but rarely from the north in summer. Towards the month of September and! 
after the autumnal equinox, the prevailing winds of considerable duration are thosef 
from the north-west. 

In October and November north-westerly gales, accompanied sometimes by 
slight storms of hail or snow, are not unfrequent. 

In winter the ordinary winds are those from the west and north-west. 

TIDES. 

During spring tides the variation between the lines of ordinary high and 1< 
water is about fourteen feet, between Metis and Bic. 

All piers to be built on this part of the south shore of the St. Lawrence shoulc 
be at least 6 feet above the highetet tides. 

DISTANCES. 

The distances, from the Church of Eimouski in a straight line, are : — 
1*89 miles to the pier already built. 
3*37 miles to Pointe a Pouliot. 
525 miles to Father Point. 

SOUNDINGS. 

During the whole time of the survey the depth of water did not diminish mori 
than two or three times to six inches lower than the line of low water, to which aj 
the soundings shown on the plan are referred. 

According to information taken in the locality, the water seldom falls to a low«i 
level, unless once during the year, in the month of April. 

ESTIMATE. 

The estimate of the probable cost of piers in the different places that 
examined in the vicinity of Kimouski, is as follows, 10 per cent having been added 
superintendence : — 

ESTIMATE OF THE PROBABLE COST OP PIERS AT THE DIFPERENT SITES. 

RIMOUSKI PIER. 

Extension of the pier of Eimouski on the shortest line to a depth of 26 feet 
low water. 

Total length 5,300 feet, of which 500 of 35, 2,200 of 45, and 2,600 of 55 feet 
width, with a wing 800 x 55 feet at the northern end. 

Probable cost, $830,000. 

POINTE A POULIOT. 

H a pier is built, with a wing of 800 feet at its northern extremity, to a dejj 
of 26 feet of water, at low water. 

Total length, including the wing, 4,600 feet, of which 3,000 by 35 and 1,600 
45 feet in width. 

322 



(6 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Probable cost, $440,000. 

If a pier is built to a depth of 32 feet instead of 26. Total length, including tk© 
wing, 5,400 feet. 

Probable cost, $570,000. 

FATHER POINT. 

For one pier with a wing of 800 feet, similar to that at Pointe a Pouliot. Tota 
length, including the wing, to a water depth of 26 feet, 2,500 feet. • 

Probable cost, $340,000. 

For one pier built to a water depth of 32 feet. Total length, wing included, 
2,970 feet. 

Probable cost, $423,000. 

For harbour formed by means of two piers and two wings, as shown on the plan 
to a water depth of 32 feet. 

Length, Breadth at top. 

Feet. Feet. Height. 

West Pier 450 x 40 

do 720 x 50 

do 900 x 60 

Wing 680 x 60 x 33 



East Pier 

do 

do 

Wins; 680 x 60 x 53 



Total length of the two piers with 

the two wings 6,650 

Probable cost, $850,000. 

With this report I transmit you, that of my assistant, 0. E. Michaud, Civil 
Engineer, whom I instructed to continue the survey during my absence whilst 
ngaged in the survey for the projected canal between the Bay of Fundy and Baie 
Verte. He accomplished the work remaining to be done with accuracy and dili- 
nce; and with the assistance of Mr. Rene Steckel and Messrs. Alfred and Felix 
amel, he prepared the plan of the survey which I now transmit you. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your very obedient servant, 

G.F. BA1LLAIRGE, 

Assistant Chief Engineer, 
; F, Bracn, Esq., 

Secretary of Public Works, 
Ottawa. 



2,750 






1,500 


X 


40 


750 


X 


50 


970 


X 


60 


680 


X 


60 


3,900 










MR. MICHAUD'S REPORT. 

Ottawa, 21st March, 1871. 

Sir, — I have the honour to transmit you the following Report on the exploration 
f theRimouski Harbour of Refuge, which you intrusted to my direction at the time 
f your departure for the Baie Verte Canal survey, on the 6th of last August. 

323 
10 «— 21J 



40 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No. 10.)' 



A. 188$ 



After your departure the soundings were continued with as much speed as 
possible, but we were frequently interrupted by wind, rain and fog. 

In order to utilize the men's time, the days on which it was impossible to take 
soundings, I made the survey of the river and all the houses from the Parish of St. 
Luce to a point 2^ miles west of the Eiver Eimouski (including the town) for a 
distance often miles. 

The survey of the Island of St. Barnabe was also made during days of bad 
weather. 

The soundings were finished on the 15th, and the survey on the 23rd of 
November. 

It was impossible to take the levels at Pointe a Pouliot before the 12th of Decem- 
ber, on account of the bad weather and the tide. 

The plan was finished previous to our departure from Eimouski, with the excep- 
tion of the notes that you may wish to add. 

Having been nearly always occupied with other work since my arrival at head- 
quarters, it was impossible for me to prepare the report sooner. 

Extent of Soundings. 

The soundings were taken from about one mile cast of Father Point to one and 
a half miles w«st of the Island of St. Barnabe, a distance often miles. All the sound4 
ings extend from low tide to a water depth of 26 feet and more. 

Depth of Water. 

Between the Isle of Canuel and the west point of the Island of St. Barnabe, thei 
depth of water varies from 7 to 1 1 feet. A little further west it deepens to 17 
feet. 

To attain a depth of 26 feet in rear of St. Barnabe Island, it is necessary to go a| 
distance of about one mile, except at the upper end, where the distance is only 2,0001 
feet. 

In order to attain a water depth of 26 feet from the end of the present pier, the] 
shortest distance is one mile, in a direction nearly north. 

At Pointe a Pouliot, which is situated nearly midway between the present pierl 
and Father Point, there is a distance of 3,800 feet from the highway to a depth of| 
26 feet of water. 

At Father Point the 26 feet depth of water is at a distance of only 1,500 feet. 

Pointe a Pouliot. 



According to the examination I made, and the information I received, Pointe 
Pouliot, which is protected on the west side by the Islands of St. Barnabe, Canuel,] 
etc., appeared to be the safest and most convenient place for the proposed harboi 
of refuge. 

Vessels can approach, using their fathom line, in seasons of fog or snow, withoi 
any danger, there being no obstacles to encounter in the vicinity of this place. 

The bottom being of mud, offers the best anchorage that could be desired fo 
vessels. 

For a harbour of 26 feet depth of water at low tide, the works required would 
as follows: — 

1st. A pier 3,800 feet in length, starting from the shore, of which 3,000 feet bj 
35 feet wide, and 800 feet by 45 feet, running north 35° 10' west. Of these 3,800 feetJ 
there are, starting from the shore, 1,300 feet of rock bottom where the water seldom] 
rises higher than from 4 to 5 feet. 

2nd. A wing of 800 feet in length by 45 feet in width, running S. 70° W. 
protect vessels against northerly winds. 

324 



Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



SITE. 



The most convenient site for this pier, is 6,000 feet eastward from the existing 
)ier at Eimouski. 



PROBABLE COST. 



The probable cost of the work, including superintendence, would be about 
i I j 4456,831. 



FATHER POINT. 

Although the distance at this place is the shortest to attain 26 feet depth of water, 
it would cost, nevertheless, as much, if not more, to make a harbour of refuge, than 
at Pointe a Pouliot. Being exposed to all the winds, it would be necessary to construct 
two piers, starting from the land, with wings, so that vessels might find a shelter. 

DATUM. 

The number 21 marked on the gauge, was taken for the datum, according to 
which all the soundings were reduced, as indicated on the plan. During the whole 
course of the summer, the water did not fall lower, except two or three times, than 
€ inches below this datum. This, I was assured, was the lowest, excepting once a 
year, in the month of April, when it lowers sometimes d feet more. 

It will be necessary, therefore, to subtract 6 inches from all the soundings on the 
plan, in order to obt ain extreme low water. 

WINDS. 

Spring. — The winds which prevail during this season are those from the east and 
north-east, fom the 15th of April to the month of May. 

Summer. — During this season the most frequent winds are generally from the 
west-south-west, varying to the south-west. 

Autumn. — The winds are generally easterly for two or three days during this sea- 
son, turning to the north-west and west. 

Winter. — After one or two calm days, it is generally an east wind, which lasts 
from 24 to 48 hours, and afterwards turns to north-west and to west, 

ICE. 

Between the town of Eimouski and the Island of St. Barnabe, the ice takes 
between the 15th and 20th of December. 

From the Island of St. Barnabe downwards, rioting ice generally appears 
towards Christmas, and sometimes not before the 15th of January, and remains 
between the east point of the Island of St. Barnabe and Eimouski pier until the 15th 
and 20th of January. 

The portion between Eimouski Pier and Father Point is not covered with 
stationary ice before the end of the month of February for periods of about fifteen 
days. 

The width of the ice at Pointe a Pouliot is about one and one-half miles. At 
Father Point the ice is nearly one mile in width. 

Between Eimouski Pier and Father Point the ice disappears towards the begin- 
ning of March, and returns with the north and north-east winds for a short time, but 
does not remain stationary. 

Between the town and the Island of St. Barnabe the ice generally disappears 
towards the 15th of April, but very seldom later and sometimes sooner. In the 
month of January, last year, the ice was all gone as far as the bridge of the Eimouski 
River, but this happens very seldom . 

325 



46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



Before concluding allow me to make the following remarks on the mode 
employed in the construction of piers at the present day : — 

1st. I observed last summer, and especially during the autumn, that the upright 
fenders usually placed on each side of the piers L are more disadvantageous than 
useful. 

These fenders in the first place are dangerous to vessels. They offer, moreover, 
so many points of resistance against which the waves of the sea break and after- 
ward rebound over the top of the pier, carrying away the ballast and all that m 
happen to be upon the pier. I witnessed this several times. 

2nd. I do not see the utility of the two or three tiers of platforms that are 
usually placed the whole length of the piers; on the contrary I think it is a greal 
fault. 

There is no necessity to put more platforms than are required to receive the 
stone necessary for the sinking of the cribs. 

For a crib of twenty-four compartmen ts, for example (by compartments I meai 
the spaces comprised between the longitudinal ties and the cross ties), no mor< 
than one platform should be put in to four or five compartments. The stone filling ii 
the other space, after the sinking of the crib^would then rest on the bed of the river, n< 
matter what its inequalities might be, and the wood work would then be relieved o 
a portion of the weight, and be less liable to be undermined or to sink more on on 
side than on the other, as was the case with the Eimouski Piei ., 

You will find herewith — 

1st. An estimate of the cost of the proposed pier. 

2nd. A list of materials with the prices at which they can be procured 
Eimouski. 

3rd. A copy of a portion of the plan showing the situation and form of the pre 
posed pier at Pointe a Pouliot. 

4th. A profile of the ground where this pier is represented on the copy of th 
plan. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

C. E. MICHAUD, 
G, F. Baillairg^, Esq., 

Assist. Chief Engineer Public Works, 
Baie Yerte, N.B. 



\k 



326 



|J46 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 

Estimate of probable cost of a pier at Pointo a Pouliot 4,600 feet in length. 

Above Low Water. 

Feet. Feet. Feet. Cubic Yards. 

3,000 long x 37.50 x 18 75,000 

1,600 " x 47.50 x 18 , 50,666 

Below Low Water. 

1,730 " x 40 x 15 38,444 

800 " x 26.50 x 50 39,259 

800 " x 29 x 50 42,937 

Landing Place. 

160 " x 33 x 10..., 1,955 

40 " x 24 x 10 355 

Total 248,616 

At $1.75 $435,078 

Add 5 per cent, for superintendence and costs .. 21,753 

Total $456,831 



C. E. MICHAUD. 

List of Materials, with the prices at which they can bo procured at RimoukL 

Description of Materials. 

$ Cta. 

Square Pine, 12 x 12 (per foot).... \9 

« Cedar, 12 x 12 " u8 

" Spruce, 12 x 12 " 06 

Flatted Pine, 10 x 12 " 08 

" Cedar, 10 x 12 " 07 

" Spruce, 10 x 12 " 05 

Pine deals, 3 inches thick (per hundred) 14 00 

Red Spruce, 15 long x 18 diameter (per stick) 2 50 

Stone for ballast, (per toise) ......... 3 00 

Gravel, (per load) 12 



REMARKS. 



The original plan submitted with this Report was handed to Sandford Fleming^ 

., C. E., by order of the Department, and was destroyed by f re when the railway 

ices were burned. A trace copy had been commenced and puitly completed when 

le original copy was sent to Mr. Fleming. It may probably be completed from the 

)tes in my hands. There is a reduced copy of the general plan showing the con- 

mr lines of 10, 15, 20 feet, etc., during ordinary low water springs. This plan was 

spared by Messrs. Tache and Boulay, two of my assistants. 

G. F. BAILLAIRG^, 

Assistant Chief Engineer of PublU Works. 
23rd February, 1876. 

3:7 



I 



40 Victoria. Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 



APPENDIX No. 6. 



REPORT ON THE IMPROVEMENTS IN 

QUEBEC HARBOUR SINCE CONFEDERATION 

On the Graving Dock at Levis, and on the Operations of 
the Lifting Barge. 

BY THE QUEBEC HARBOUR COMMISSIONERS. 



46 Victoria, Sessional Papers (No. 10.) A. 1883 






APPENDIX No. 6. 

EEPOET ON QUEBEC HAEBOTJE. 

No. 30776. Harbour Commissioners' Office, 

Quebec, 4th January, 1883. 
Sir, — I have the honour to transmit you herewith the two General Keports asked 
for in your letter of the 11th ultimo. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your most obedient servant, 
A. H. YEEEET, 

■E&] 

Secretary Treasurer. 
F. H. Ennis, Esq . , Secretary, 
Public Works Department, 
Ottawa. 

(tic 
Quebec Harbour Works. 

Quebec, 30th December, 1882. 

The Board of Harbour Commissioners as at present constituted was appointed 
under Act 22 Vict., cap. 32, 1858, and commenced with a debt of $723,000 for works 
completed by the old Commissioners, viz. : the Pointe a Carey, or Commissioners' 
Wharf, and the ballast wharf or breakwater, the former, with its stores, costing 
$270,000, and the latter $215,000, with other miscellaneous charges. 

The works at present in progress and advancing towards completion aro, firstly 
a design for harbour improvements now known as the " Princess Louise Embank- 
ment " and " Docks," and, secondly, a large graving dock on the south or Levis side 
of the St. Lawrence, called the "Lome Graving Dock." 

Works of improvement in this direction had been discussed under various 
aspects for years by the Harbour Commissioners and others interested, but itwasnoii 
until designs were called for these purposes in 1874 that any definite scheme wa* 
determined upon for harbour improvements, when a selection was made of th<! 
embouchure of the Eiver St. Charles for the purpose of constructing a tidal basiij 
and wet dock as the first of a probable series of such accommodation in this locality 

Acting under a Minute of the Privy Council of Canada, approved by His Excelffl 
lency the Governor General, in accordance with the provisions of the 17th section o 
the Act, 36 Victoria, Cap. 32., the construction of certain works there was finalh 
determined upon. 

The first section of these works, now nearly complete, forms the centre embank 
ment of a scheme for double wet docks and tidal basins on either side of it; thj 
embankment itself having a length of 4,000 feet by a breadth of 330 feet, extending 
from the gas-house wharf to the end of the formerly isolated mole or breakwate 
already sunk in fifty feet of water, and known as the ballast wharf. 

This somewhat unique structure was constructed in the years 1866 and 1867 
a cost of $215,589, by the Harbour Commissioners, as a first step in the direction cj 
improvement, partly with a view to its affording shelter to wharves along the Palai 

330 



life 
11 



17, a 
)n c 
>alai 



46 Victoria. 



Sessional Papers (No, 10.) 



A. 1SS3 



from the north-east, and as a means of utilizing the ballast from ships arriving in port,, 
instead of depositing in the river in what was known as " ballast ground." 

This valuable commencement of these works has fully answered all the expecta- 
tions connected with it. It is now full, and has recently had its coping and general 
surface level brought to the same structural height of 6 feet above high water spring 
tides, as the coping level of the masonry of the quay wall of the tidal basin, of which 
it forms a principal initial part. 

From the ballast wharf, on the south side of the " Louise Embankment," along 
its entire length a quay wall, having a crib work and concrete foundation, with a 
asonry superstructure, has been constructed with a preliminary channelway of 150 
et in width ; of this channelway, 1,250 feet in length is to be dredged to 26 feet at 
w water from 23 to 24 ieet, and the remaining 2,160 feet to a depth of 13 feet at low 
water. 

There being a rise of 18 feet at spring tides and 13 feet at neap tides, the least 
normal depth of float water will, when these works are complete, eventually be 26 
feet in both the tidal basin and wet dock respectively. 

The first section of the quay wall, 1,250 feet in length, forms one side of the 
enclosed area of the wet dock, of which three sides are now complete, and will contain 
an area of twenty acres, and the 2,160 feet of the second section forms one side of the 
enclosed area of the wet dock, three sides also of which are complete and will con- 
tain an area of forty acres ; the whole representing an entire water area of sixty 
acres. 

Work was begun under contract for the completed first section of these works 
in May, 1877, and was continued during each working season to the end of November, 
1881, when it was determined to commence under a new contract for the remaining 
section of the works. 

The total expenditure on works under contract amount to $734,555.76, and the 
expendit